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FAQs on Betta Diseases: Diagnosis

Related Articles: Betta Diseases, Betta Systems, Anabantoids/Gouramis & Relatives, Betta splendens/Siamese Fighting FishImproved (Better?) Products for Bettas!,

Related FAQs:  Betta Disease 1, Betta Disease 2Betta Disease 3, Betta Disease 4, Betta Disease 5, Betta Disease 6, Betta Disease 7, Betta Disease 8, Betta Disease 9, Betta Disease 10, Betta Disease 11, Betta Disease 12, Betta Disease 13, Betta Disease 14, Betta Disease 15, Betta Disease 16, Betta Disease 17, Betta Disease 18 , Betta Disease 19, Betta Disease 20, Betta Disease 21 Betta Health 22, Betta Health 23, Betta Health 24, Betta Health 25, Betta Health 26, Betta Health 28, Betta Health 29, Betta Health 30, Betta Health 31,
Betta Disease Causes/Etiologies: Determining/Diagnosing, Environmental (By far the largest cat.), Nutritional, Viral/Cancer, Infectious (Bacterial, Fungal) , Parasitic: Ich/White Spot, Velvet; Senescence/Old Age, Cures/Curatives/Treatments,
FAQs on Betta Medicines: Betta Medicines period, Antibiotics/Antibacterials, Anti-Protozoals (Metronidazole, eSHa...), Copper, Formalin, Malachite Green, Anthelminthics, Organophosphates, Salts, All Other Betta Med.s,


Oooh, I don't feel so good...

New Print and eBook on Amazon

Betta Success
Doing what it takes to keep Bettas healthy long-term

by Robert (Bob) Fenner

My Betta Fish Hector      8/16/17
To Whom it may concern,
<Howsit Deb?>
I am concerned about my Betta fish. I got him last week like this and he is eating and behaving normally. I know for a fact that he has a mild case of fin rot though, but what I cannot figure out is whether the slight discoloration (brown spot) in his face is normal or a fungal infection.
<Mmm; may be "just" stress. Perhaps simply from being moved. Do you have measures for water quality? This system is cycled, filtered, heated?>
Please help, this is my second Betta Fish and I am doing everything I can to understand the situation.
I appreciate it.
Sincerely,
Deb
<Need information. Bob Fenner>

Re: My Betta Fish Hector      8/16/17
Dear Bob,
<Hey Deb!>
The tank is heated and filtered and I used bottled water for when I first got him a week and a half ago.
<Mmm; what sort/s of bottled water? Is your tap/mains water real trouble?
Bettas do need some mineral, hardness... I would at least mix some (a quarter, half?) of such bottled water with tap>
He seems to be fine since he eats (I feed him two fish pellets a day) and also builds frequent bubble nests.
<Ahh! Good signs>
He's usually very active. I added aquarium salt in his tank about 5 days ago.
Sincerely,
Deb
<I would leave all as is then... Again, being moved is likely the cause of the split dorsal fin, concern re facial color loss here. Treatment/s will likely cause more harm than good. BobF>

Re: My Betta Fish Hector       8/17/17
Bob,
<Deb>
Thank you so much for your help!
- Deb
<Certainly welcome. I'd ask that you read (re-read?) this brief piece on Betta Care: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/betta_splendens.htm
to set my mind at ease that I've mentioned all the basics here. Bob Fenner>

What is the treatment for this Betta? (RMF, chip in if you want!)      6/21/17
Hi, I was hoping you could help my fish?
<Certainly seems to have been through the wars!>
I will copy and paste what I wrote on a forum. So far they haven’t been much help… was hoping you might!!
"Yes, you may have seen my other thread. *To catch you up quick-* At this point I just need some expert eyes to take a look at him and tell me what you believe it is and what my next plan of action. The fresh water in his hospital tank and 10 days of hard salting has absolutely helped, particularly in the reducing of the black in his fins and behavior. He ate this morning and took a bite of a bloodworm tonight. More progress than in weeks. He is not old.. estimate 1yr 4mos. I let it get so far because I wasn't aware of the dangers of lumps on fish. This started I believe in January.. maybe before. He had come from very active in his 10gal with my Pleco (little Pleco). I took him from Petco in OCT to be a companion and because he was the suicidal looking one at the time! :( He had some great times for awhile. Tank was vacuumed cleaned 1/3 a week and then time started to get away from me and it changed to 50% every 2 weeks and then 3 at the end.
<Was this alongside filtration? To be clear: Bettas need filters. Maybe small, gentle, air-powered sponge filters rather than electric canisters -- but filtration nonetheless! Exposure to non-zero ammonia and nitrite will cause stress, sickness and death.>

I won't allow that again!! Anyway this fish was very lively, spent most of his time swimming and socializing, then more of his time chasing his reflection, then most of his time at the heater. I had a hard time keeping tank warm so much of the winter it was 75ish. I assumed for heat, but maybe was feeling lousy.
<Bettas do need steady heat. Around 25 C/77 F is good, even a smidgen above; but consistently cooler or unstable temperatures are bad. Cold air is especially stressful for them, hence the need to provide a lid over the aquarium to keep in the warmth.>
This whole thing came on very very slowly. Right now I have him on Kordon fungus rid and 1tsp per 5 gal Salt., just so it's something fighting till I know what to buy next. (and double dose stress coat)
Questions!
1. Does this look like a case of fungus and fin rot?
<A bacterial infection (such as Finrot) seems much more likely than a fungal infection.
There are medications that treat both, such as eSHa 2000 and Kanaplex. Avoid the tea-tree oil products (such as Melafix and Bettafix) as these are rather unreliable -- anything marketed as having "the healing power of..." is likely about as useful as healing crystals!>
2. Since I ran over my treatment of salt, where do I go next? Next meds?
<See above; salt isn't a treatment for anything you're dealing with here. Indeed, it might well stress your fish.>
3. How often do I clean tank and what %?
<Assuming mature biological filtration, weekly water changes around 25% are ample. Betta breeders who don't use filters but instead keep Bettas in jars have to do 100% water changes every day, ensuring temperature and water chemistry remain constant -- this just isn't practical for casual fishkeepers.>
4. As a side question, if I harvest him Mosquito Larvae and clean them, will that help him? He LOVES them.
<Like potato chips, mosquito larvae are a perfectly acceptable snack. But they aren't particularly nutritious, and there's some suspicion that they can bring diseases into the aquarium, so don't use them every day. Much better to focus on good quality flake and pellets (Tetra, Hikari and other leading brands are all good) alongside safe live foods with no risk of carrying disease (brine shrimp, daphnia and wingless fruit flies are reared in fish-free environments, so should be safe).>
Current behavior: Swims around, hangs on top mostly, just started attempting to eat, scared easily. Will extend fins, but not in full flare. Lethargy. “
Thank you!!!
<Welcome. Neale.>

Re: What is the treatment for this Betta? (RMF, chip in if you want!)     6/24/17
I guess what Ill do is ill make my writing blue so its not so confusing
<Eh?>
Yes, he’s a fighter!
<Indeed.>
Yes, he lived in a filtered and buffered 10 Gal with my Pleco
<Ah, the plot thinnens
. Common Plecs, and possibly even Ancistrus (Bristlenose) Plecs too, will "latch" onto the flanks of slow-moving fish to graze on the mucous there. It may be that they're hungry, Plecs often being given far too little food -- in the wild they're constantly ploughing through algae and organic muck, processing massive amounts of food. Anyway, Plecs cause horrible scars and blisters on the fish they 'attack', and because they do so at night, many people find it hard to believe their Plec is responsible. But if you see big blisters on the side of a fish, a hungry Plec is very likely the cause. Seen this many, many times. If in doubt, remove the Plec to another tank (10 gallons is too small, even for an Ancistrus) and medicate as per Finrot; you should see the Betta healing up nicely.>
Haha, it works the same with people!! Bactria and fungus aren’t to be messed with… you want them dead! Ok, here’s the thing, you suggested Kanaplex and two people on the forum suggested Metroplex by the same company. I told them what you suggested and they said Kanaplex for secondary infection. I emailed Seachem which one they’d steer me (hoping they get back to me!) But now I’m really confused because when I looked at their products I found Paraguard which supposedly covers everything. Now I’m really stuck!!
<Paraguard is more of a "first response" before fish get really infected wounds; for example, after they've had a fight and their tail fins are a bit torn. Kanaplex and MetroPlex are both good, but have different jobs. MetroPlex is primarily used when dealing with protozoan pathogens such as Whitespot and Hexamita, this latter extremely difficult to treat without using Metronidazole. Kanaplex is an antibiotic containing Kanamycin, and a better bet when treating Finrot and other bacterial infections. Make sense?>
Thank you!!!
<Most welcome. Neale.>
Re: What is the treatment for this Betta? (RMF, chip in if you want!)      6/24/17

<Ah, the plot thinnens. Common Plecs, and possibly even Ancistrus (Bristlenose) Plecs too, will "latch" onto the flanks of slow-moving fish to graze on the mucous there. It may be that they're hungry, Plecs often being given far too little food -- in the wild they're constantly ploughing through algae and organic muck, processing massive amounts of food. Anyway, Plecs cause horrible scars and blisters on the fish they 'attack', and because they do so at night, many people find it hard to believe their Plec is responsible. But if you see big blisters on the side of a fish, a hungry Plec is very likely the cause. Seen this many, many times. If in doubt, remove the Plec to another tank (10 gallons is too small, even for an Ancistrus) and medicate as per Finrot; you should see the Betta healing up nicely.>
OH MY GOSH, thank you!! Now that makes sense!!! I had no idea!! They used to hang out together but I know the Pleco is VERY active at night. He throws stuff around in the tank.. sounds like an elephant. That and too the Betta would flare at his reflection and I know that makes them prone to fin rot in the long run!
<Paraguard is more of a "first response" before fish get really infected wounds; for example, after they've had a fight and their tail fins are a bit torn. Kanaplex and MetroPlex are both good, but have different jobs. MetroPlex is primarily used when dealing with protozoan pathogens such as Whitespot and Hexamita, this latter extremely difficult to treat without using Metronidazole. Kanaplex is an antibiotic containing Kanamycin, and a better bet when treating Finrot and other bacterial infections. Make sense?>
Yes, yes it does!! Thank you again!! I will order it ASAP. Finally something makes sense :) I will update you if you don’t mind :)
<<By all means, and glad to help. Cheers, Neale.>>

Re: What is the treatment for this Betta? (RMF, chip in if you want!)     6/28/17
Hey, it's me again!! My Kanaplex just arrived *Yay*. Do you have any idea how the HECK I dose it?
<Accurate kitchen scales, perhaps? Weigh out the amount needed for, say, 5 gallons; divide by 5, and that's how much to add to 1 gallon.>
I measured their small scoop dose (it's per 5 gallons) and 3 of those fit into 1/4tsp measuring key. How on earth do I dose that for a half gallon tank!!???
<I would NOT be keeping a Betta in a 0.5 gallon tank. As a friend of mine used to say, "that's not an aquarium, that's a vase"! My first investment would be something bigger, 4-5 gallons, knowing that improved living conditions WILL improve the chances of your fish doing well/getting better.>
Also - I have a giant plastic Poland spring bottle that is 5 gal that I use to clean tank with.. could I pre put the meds in there and then give him 100% changes everyday? will it stay good.
<Tricky to say. Diluted medicine should be fine for a day or two, but that assumes no further chemical reactions. Sunlight, dissolved gases, even the minerals in drinking water are all possible sources of problems -- not to mention any bacteria able to grow in the diluted medicine that couldn't survive (or even get into) the sealed, concentrated medicine bottle. So without a vet telling me this was safe, I would not do this.>
Or is it a medicine that builds up in the tank and needs to be kept as is and not cleaned?
<Generally fish medicines break down in the aquarium very quickly, likely within a day or so, simply because it's a warm, oxygen-rich environment with lots of organic detritus. Hence we need to add medicine every day (or
whatever) across a period of several days.>
Thanks!! *head tree*
<Head tree? Cheers, Neale.>
Re: What is the treatment for this Betta? (RMF, chip in if you want!)     6/28/17

Haha, I got a response from Seachem as well.
<Cool.>
Thank you.
<Welcome.>
Yeah, they said do 1/5 scoop or pre mix all in 5 gal and take what I need from it. That sounds the easiest. Of course!! I'm not keeping fishy in this box!! He's just in there to heal and break from the filter (buffered or not, there's still movement) .. it's working great.. he keeps on eating' :) So far so good on Kanaplex. You shouldn't hear from me for another week or so. lol!
<Let's hope, eh?>
Hey, and yes, when you get home late, excited to see fish meds in the mail and open the box to find complicated measurements banging your head against a tree comes to mind.
<Indeed. Good luck, Neale.>

Black tiny spots on my Female/Crowntail Betta     3/1/17
I notice three very tiny black spots on my Female/Crowntail Betta's back area(close to her head), and some black spots on her fins (left side).
These spot start appearing when I thought my fish tank had cycled. It took a while but, now the tank is cycled. Ammonia 0, pH 7, Nitrites 0, and Nitrates 0. I have a great filter and heater (depending on the temp in the room it can be 78-80 degrees. The spots do not seem to hurt or bother her.
I check to see if they were holes but, they are not. Could going through the cycling cause these spots?
<Might well be a factor here... Can't be very sure w/o looking at myself, perhaps sampling, observing w/ a microscope; but "dark marks" in/on Bettas (and other fishes) are often evidence of stress, neurological damage... and just genetic (Melanocyte) expression>
The ammonia has high for a week and then 0.
<Ahh; another stressor; often deadly>
Then the nitrites became high for a couple of days and then 0. The Nitrates were 5.0 ppm and then 0. I used good bacteria to hurry the cycling process. I have a 2.5 gallon tank.
<Needs to NOT be present in a cycling system; NEEDS a stable, heated, filtered world>

When I purchase my Betta, she was very small not even a half inch long. I thought a larger tank would be to much
for her being so young. I do plan to purchase a 5 gallon tank when she get about 2 inches long.
I would be very thankful for your help. I look forward to hearing from you.
<I would provide the mentioned needs and NOT treat/medicate here; as this will only add further stress>
Thank you for taking the time to read my email.
Carolyn Bagley
<Thank you for writing so clearly, completely. Bob Fenner>

Betta hernia; umm; no
Hello my baby female Betta has had a long week! First her fingers split
<Fin rays.... someone traumatizing this fish>

and I did a 100% tank cleaning
<A poor idea. See WWM re "frequent partial water changes"; and "Betta Systems"
>
and added aquarium salt and she started to heal quickly about 5 days later (yesterday) I notice she wasn't with her sisters at feeding time it took a really long time to find her and when I did she was near the bottom with her tail floating up... I figured she was constipated or it is swimming bladder issues I placed her in a breeding cage in their tank and fasted her not that she was in trestle in food anyhow.
I noticed today she has what looks like a hernia and I have not been able to find any helpful information on how to treat her. any info will help! I have attached pictures of the "hernia".
Thank you
Stacy
<And search WWM w/ the string "Betta egg bound", "Betta nutrition". AFTER reading, if you have questions, concerns, please write back.
Bob Fenner>

Betta hernia       /Neale       9/10/16
Hello my baby female Betta has had a long week! First her fingers split and I did a 100% tank cleaning and added aquarium salt and she started to heal quickly about 5 days later (yesterday) I notice she wasn't with her sisters at feeding time it took a really long time to find her and when I did she was near the bottom with her tail floating up... I figured she was constipated or it is swimming bladder issues I placed her in a breeding cage in their tank and fasted her not that she was in trestle in food anyhow.
I noticed today she has what looks like a hernia and I have not been able to find any helpful information on how to treat her. any info will help! I have attached pictures of the "hernia".
Thank you
Stacy
<Hi Stacy. This isn't a hernia as such, but a prolapse of the final part of the digestive tract. Not uncommon in fish that have been exposed to less than perfect water conditions. Coupled with your report of Finrot (the frayed fins) I'd be reviewing water quality and filtration. To recap the basics: Bettas need a heated, filtered aquarium. I'd say not less than 4 to 5 gallons. Definitely not bowls! The filter should be standard biological filter, something like an air-powered sponge or small canister is ideal.
Water quality needs to be good: zero ammonia and zero nitrite. Finrot is almost always a sign of either fighting or poor water quality, and since fighting isn't an explanation here, assuming your Betta is kept alone (and it should be) then water quality is your problem. Aquarium salt isn't a treatment for either the prolapse or the Finrot, but a reliable antibiotic will help soothe the symptoms. Improving living conditions will be essential. Hope this helps, Neale.>

Beta fins      7/1/16
<...1.4 megs....>
I have 3 beta fish in an Aqueon waterfall aquarium.
<Male Betta's don't live communally; nor in continuous view of each other>

My beta fish have adjusted to the flowing water, all of them except my rose petal fish. He has in a way adjusted to it, but I'm very worried about him, because I saw this(look at picture attached). A few of the strands on his rear fin are
missing,
<Torn off>
when I purchased him this wasn't there, and I've had him for 2-3 months now. I saw this yesterday I had turned off the filter for a few days and 1 day he was fine and the next day I look at him and he's like this, all of this happened when the filter was turned off. All three beta fish are separated. What happened to him?
<... as stated. READ here:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/bettasysart.htm
and the linked files above
. Bob Fenner>

 Looks like trauma to me.

Beta fins /Neale       7/2/16
I have 3 beta fish in an Aqueon waterfall aquarium.
<Two gallons for three Bettas? Would need to know about water quality before discounting Finrot,
the usual cause for raggedy fins once you discount physical damage. It's a clever aquarium design for sure, but whether it works as good as it looks is unknown to me. I'd need proof in the form of, at minimum, a nitrite test result. I'm also staggered
something sold for Bettas doesn't have a heater. That's insane!
These are tropical fish that will die at room temperatures (unless of course your room is a constant 25C/77F or warmer!). It sucks that companies that should know better are misleading inexperienced fishkeepers into thinking Bettas don't need a heater. That'd be like telling someone a dog doesn't need walks! So I assume you've installed a heater, otherwise environmental stress and consequent Finrot are extremely likely. For sure this fish is sick before the others, but any Betta kept at room temperature is a Betta that's going to die sooner rather than later.>
My beta fish have adjusted to the flowing water, all of them except my rose petal fish. He has in a way adjusted to it, but I'm very worried about him, because I saw this (look at picture attached). A few of the strands on his rear fin are missing, when I purchased him this wasn't there, and I've had him for 2-3 months now. I saw this yesterday I had turned off the filter for a few days and 1 day he was fine and the next day I look at him and he's like this, all of this happened when the filter was turned off. All three beta fish are separated. What happened to him?
<As Bob F. suggests, physical damage is one possibility. Bettas aren't adapted to flowing currents. They come from ponds and ditches, and the long-fin forms are artificial fish at that, selected for looks rather than swimming ability. In tanks with currents they're easily "sucked" into inlets or washed against rough objects by the current, and the result is
damage to their fins. The ideal system is something around 3-5 gallons per Betta, with an air-powered sponge filter and a heater. Cheers, Neale.>

Betta; dis. diag.     3/14/16
Hi
<Yvonne>
I have had my Betta since just after May last year. I came home this afternoon to see what looks like a greenish/ greyish under his chin.
<Mmm; likely not pathogenic in nature then... unless you've been feeding live freshwater food/s, added live plants, other livestock...>
He seems to be swimming ok and eating fine, but I have also noticed he seems to be handing more than normal, he is in a tank with angelfish who seem to keep themselves to themselves.
His tail also looks like it has shredded.
<Mmm; the Angels>
It colouring under his chin I have only notice today.
Last week we cleaned his big tank out and put him in a tank on his own which in he seemed to be a bit sad and seemed lonely so we put him back in the tank with his angelfish friends.
Please can you advise what could be wrong with him, could he be sick or just getting old.
<Possibly either; or both>
If sick could you also please advise what treatment I could use.
<In case this is an infectious agent at work, let's have you read here:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/BetDisInfeF.htm
Bob Fenner>
Thank you very much in advance for you help in making my boy better
From Yvonne
Betta; health; Neale's turn     3/15/16

Hi
<Hello Yvonne,>
I have had my Betta since just after May last year. I came home this afternoon to see what looks like a greenish/ greyish under his chin. He seems to be swimming ok and eating fine, but I have also noticed he seems to be handing more than normal, he is in a tank with angelfish who seem to keep themselves to themselves.
<Sometimes do. But as usual, the standard caveat: Bettas don't mix well with other fish, not because of aggression, but because they're ill-suited to community tanks.>
His tail also looks like it has shredded.
<Could be physical damage from the Angels (which can/do peck at fins, despite being long-finned themselves, the hypocrites!) or from an over powerful filter, or simple stress of some sort.>
It colouring under his chin I have only notice today. Last week we cleaned his big tank out and put him in a tank on his own which in he seemed to be a bit sad and seemed lonely so we put him back in the tank with his angelfish friends. Please can you advise what could be wrong with him, could he be sick or just getting old.
<Depends on his age. Assuming you got your Betta "from new" he was something like six months old when you bought him, and you've had him another ten months. So let's say he's a little under a year and a half in
age. That's not old-old by Betta standards, but certainly well into middle age. They can live 3-4 years in captivity, though in the wild they're more like annuals than anything else. A lot depends on his mood. If he's
swimming normally and feeding happily, I'd treat as per Finrot, review his living conditions and tankmates, and see what happens.>
If sick could you also please advise what treatment I could use.
<Do avoid the cure-alls (some would say cure-nothings) like Melafix and instead use a decent antibiotic or antibacterial that doesn't rely on tea tree oil or some other nonsense like that. Here in the UK, I'd be using
eSHa 2000, but in your part of the world other options may be available. As always, remember to remove carbon during usage.>
Thank you very much in advance for you help in making my boy better
From Yvonne
<Cheers, Neale.>

Betta Tumor      /RMF    12/18/15
Hey guys, thanks for this forum. I really cannot find anything to help my Betta, Luna. I noticed about 6 months ago (June) that his one eye seemed to have a “fuzzy” look to it at the top only. It hasn’t gotten better or worse and I use a magnifying glass to see it. I did a round of Melafix with no change.
<Worthless>
Then I did a round of Pimafix with no effect.
<Ditto; these are "homeopathic" scams>

I surmised he might have hurt his eye swimming around and while it didn’t get better, it never got worse. Then his gill covers started sticking out some…. I couldn’t figure it out! I worried about parasites but I have introduced NOTHING into the tank since I got him 1 year earlier and I can’t see a thing - there is no mucus, no film, he isn’t rubbing against anything… Ultimately a tumor seems to have formed between his gills under his head and I am wondering if that is why his gill covers are out a bit. He keeps his mouth open all the time too. He lives in a 5 gallon, heated filtered tank with perfect water parameters (except the pH is a 7.4 to 7.6. ) I am really worried about him and have been since this summer. I have had him about a year and a half. At thanksgiving, I started to add .5 tsp per gallon of salt. This week, I started tetracycline because he has some red on his head above his eye but again, he bumps (not rubs) against the glass, the log, the filter grate, the pump valve… I figured that if he was hurting himself the antibiotic couldn’t hurt. Now, I am wondering if I should top the antibiotic and try an anti parasitic. I can’t see anything on him like in the pictures all over the web. He is a pink pearl Betta with burgundy so keep that in mind when you see the pics. The bump between his gills looks like a blister, it looks puffy and soft, not hard.
He has been gulping air for about 3 months but he seems to have become worse in the last two weeks because he is eating less. I also think his dorsal fin is not expanded like it normally is when he drifts. He stays at the top of the tank with his head up and body arched downwards. I have yet to see him lying on the bottom of the tank. These pics were taken on Tuesday of this week. Do you think this can be something else besides a tumor.
I am going to be devastated if I loose <lose> him. He has turned me into a fish nerd.
I am eager to hear your thoughts and suggestions. I just want to take the best care of him that I can. Thank you! Kathy
<This fish looks like it is suffering from a goiter. Do please use the search tool on WWM, and avail yourself of a commercial iodide-ate product (or Lugol's solution, or...) applied to foods, the water. Bob Fenner>

Betta Tumor /Neale          12/19/15
Hey guys, thanks for this forum. I really cannot find anything to help my Betta, Luna. I noticed about 6 months ago (June) that his one eye seemed to have a “fuzzy” look to it at the top only. It hasn’t gotten better or worse and I use a magnifying glass to see it. I did a round of Melafix with no change. Then I did a round of Pimafix with no effect. I surmised he might have hurt his eye swimming around and while it didn’t get better, it never got worse. Then his gill covers started sticking out some…. I couldn’t figure it out! I worried about parasites but I have introduced NOTHING into the tank since I got him 1 year earlier and I can’t see a thing - there is no mucus, no film, he isn’t rubbing against anything… Ultimately a tumor seems to have formed between his gills under his head and I am wondering if that is why his gill covers are out a bit. He keeps his mouth open all the time too. He lives in a 5 gallon, heated filtered tank with perfect water parameters (except the pH is a 7.4 to 7.6. ) I am really worried about him and have been since this summer. I have had him about a year and a half. At thanksgiving, I started to add .5 tsp per gallon of salt. This week, I started tetracycline because he has some red on his head above his eye but again, he bumps (not rubs) against the glass, the log, the filter grate, the pump valve… I figured that if he was hurting himself the antibiotic couldn’t hurt. Now, I am wondering if I should top the antibiotic and try an anti parasitic. I can’t see anything on him like in the pictures all over the web. He is a pink pearl Betta with burgundy so keep that in mind when you see the pics. The bump between his gills looks like a blister, it looks puffy and soft, not hard.
He has been gulping air for about 3 months but he seems to have become worse in the last two weeks because he is eating less. I also think his dorsal fin is not expanded like it normally is when he drifts. He stays at the top of the tank with his head up and body arched downwards. I have yet to see him lying on the bottom of the tank. These pics were taken on Tuesday of this week. Do you think this can be something else besides a tumor.
I am going to be devastated if I loose him. He has turned me into a fish nerd.
I m eager to hear your thoughts and suggestions. I just want to take the best care of him that I can. Thank you! Kathy
<Not going to disagree with Bob F. on this. Iodine deficiency seems likely given the position of the swelling. Can be corrected using appropriate feeding... iodine-rich foods, marine aquarium iodine supplement, etc. On the other hand, will make the observation that Bettas, especially the more inbred varieties like yours, have all sorts of problems built into them through the lack of natural selection winnowing out less useful genes. End result is not that these fish are intrinsically doomed to die young, they're not, but that anything short of proactive, preventive healthcare is more likely to lead to problems. Do read elsewhere on WWM re: Betta care, in particular diet and the importance of extrinsic factors such as airborne pollution, cold air, etc. Cheers, Neale.>

Betta question   12/15/15
Wondering if anyone knows what is ailing my plakat half moon Betta. He's in a heated cycled 3 gallon tank, water quality is excellent (I test weekly)
<How much NO3? Any NH3/NH4OH?>
and I do slow 50% water changes matching pH and temp. PH is 6.8-7.
Temperature is 80 degrees Fahrenheit.
Four days ago I woke up to find my little guy lethargic and not eating. I fasted all day and did his regularly scheduled water change. The next morning he was acting his normal hungry active self, but I noticed a swelling on his forehead between his eyes and his lips are badly swollen.
<?!>
Tissue is normal blue-gray color, not red nor white.
<... could be... bacterial, protozoal, water quality, a trauma...>

Since then I've been doing small daily water changes of 25% with 1/8 th teaspoon of aquarium salt added. I can't see any fungal growth. His head has always been blue and gray, but nothing fuzzy. He continues to be active and eats. I ordered KanaPlex in case it's bacterial, but it won't be shipped to my address for another week or so.
Could a tumor show up so quickly?
<Not likely; no>
Could it be bacterial or a parasite?
<Yes>
Any ideas?
<All sorts; mainly to direct you to WWM for reading, review. See the articles, FAQs, SubFAQs files on Betta Diseases?>
I have only had him for 6 months and I have another Betta in a cycled 5 gallon who is in excellent condition.
Thank you for any help you can send my way. Should I discontinue the aquarium salt and try Epson salts?
<The printer co.? Maybe Epsom, MgSO4>
Susan
<Bob>
Re: Betta question        12/16/15

Hi Bob,
ammonia is 0, nitrite is 0, nitrate less than 5 ppm (tank cycled and stable for last 6 months).
<Ah, good>
Epsom salt (not Epson the printer :)) baths were recommended (1 tsp per gallon of tank water) for up to 15 min.s.
<I'd just leave a modicum in the system, as prescribed on WWM>
Some people recommend SeaChem Paraguard, others Kanaplex (but not to mix the two). I don't feed live food, only Spectrum pellets and freeze dried brine and daphnia.
<Good>
I think I checked the articles on Betta diseases, nothing close to what he has. Yes, it could be trauma, he has a resin driftwood ornament in his tank, only 2 weeks old. Do you think that a course of Kanaplex would be the way to go if he doesn't improve?
<Won't likely do any harm...>
Thanks,
Susan
<Welcome. BobF>

Photo and update on Plakat's Betta with swollen lips and head      12/17/15
Hi Bob and crew,
I managed to get cu photo of my little guy.
<I'll say!>
He is still eating although with a little difficulty (lips are still swollen) but he is still swimming around although he is resting more inside his resin cave. Fins not clamped and he still comes to surface to greet me.
Stopped salt as not convinced it is fungus. Only added salt because I thought the swelling could be due to trauma (he is normally very hyper guy).
<This is what I would have done as well>
Ordered KanaPlex in case it's bacterial (amazingly LFS doesn't carry antibiotics).
<Strange... though I will state w/ high confidence, that most all such use w/ ornamental fishes is a waste (of time, resources); much more than half in humans as well>
Kanaplex won't be here till next week.
Continuing gentle water changes of 25% every other day, ammonia=0, nitrate=0, nitrate <5 ppm, pH=6.8-7, temp=80.
Haven't tried Epsom salts yet because didn't want to add to tank if you all didn't think it would be of benefit.
Have you seen anything like this before?
<I have.... but w/o sampling, 'scope use; possibly culture; perhaps even sacrificing, embedding, sectioning/staining for histological examination.... can still only guess. Is this viral (Lymphocystis), tumorous from whatever cause?
Bacterial? Bob Fenner>
Susan

Betta With Unknown Illness     /RMF        12/9/15
I was wondering if you could help me with my Betta. I can't figure out what may be wrong with him. I am thinking a bacterial infection. Over a week ago, our Betta was not being as energetic as he normally is and wasn't too excited about food. At first, he would spend most of his time either on top of his tank in different areas in the floating water sprite or he would be in his log. He would occasionally swim down to the bottom of the tank in the morning and evening, but usually just stayed at the top the rest of the day. The past two days, however, he has been staying around the same area at the top of the tank in the water sprite and barely moving. I can get him to eat a piece of food a day, but that is about it.
<What re water quality tests, temperature? Maintenance notes? Foods, feeding?>
His fins have been somewhat shredded for awhile, it started as occasional pinholes in his fins and turned to his fins being shredded. I tried to first treat that with more water changes and cappata leaves. When that wasn't helping, I started to add Seachem StressGuard (this was about 3 weeks ago). After about a week of StressGuard, he seemed to slow down some
but would perk back up after a water change. So I stopped the StressGuard just after 1.5 weeks to see if it was affecting him. But about a week ago, he starting to slow down and start staying at the top of the tank. First, I was doing daily water changes and added the Betta Spa packets in his tank.
I had also added a poly filter pad to his filter in case there is something in the water (it turned tan/brown). I have since removed the PolyFilter since I am medicating his tank. Since I have already lost a Betta this year to what first seemed like constipation but I believe may have been a bacterial infection (which was housed in the same tank), I first added
Metronidazole to some frozen brine shrimp for him to eat in case he also has a bacteria infection. He had the Metronidazole for 3 days until he wouldn't eat it and after a day, I switched to Kanaplex and added that to his water. I added the second dose of Kanaplex this morning and he hasn't really moved. Look wise, I cannot see anything wrong with him except for the shredded fins. He has not lost any color, his fins aren't clamped and he is not bloated. He does have some disfigurement from birth, I am assuming. He does not have his ventral fins and his right gill has stuck some. He is about 9 to 10 months old, from a local fish store that gets their Bettas from a local breeder. We have had him for 2.5 months.
His tank is a cycled 15 gallon tank. The temperature is between 79 and 81 degrees. He lives with ember tetras, cherry shrimp, MTS and Spixi snails.
Everyone else is doing well and the MTS and shrimp are continuously breeding.
<Good signs>
He usually eats Omega One Betta Buffet flakes (2 to 3 small flakes), twice a day, since he has trouble eating the pellets. He also gets his diet supplemented with frozen brine shrimp, bloodworms
<I'd skip these; implicated in disease>
and mysis shrimp about 3 times a week. Right now, I am trying to give him some flakes and/or brine shrimp to see what he will eat. We do weekly water changes of 25% to 30%.
Water parameters are:
Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0
Nitrate: 10
pH: 7.6
Hardness (GH): 5
Alkalinity (KH): 6
<These are all okay...>
His tank has Seachem Onyx Sand Substrate with live plants, driftwood, ADA Dragon Scale stone and PetSmart decor. The filter is an Aqueon QuietFlow 10 power filter. We are thinking of changing to a stronger filter.
<Mmm; should be fine as is>
Could something be wrong with the tank itself since we had another Betta in this tank that got bloated and then died a couple of months later?
<Possibly; though what I cannot say>
Everyone else in the tank are doing well. Or could it be something else besides a bacterial infection? Right now, I am treating him is his normal tank since everyone else is doing well with the treatments. Am I using the right medication? If there is a harmful bacteria in the tank, would a UV sterilizer help?
<Possibly>
He is still a young fish and I really want to save him. If need to, we can set up another tank for him but that still doesn't tell me what the problem may be.
Thank you for any help you can give me.
--
Thank you,
Stacy
<Am going to pass on your note to Neale Monks here, in the hope that he has some suggestions.
Bob Fenner>
Betta With Unknown Illness /Neale         12/9/15

I was wondering if you could help me with my Betta. I can't figure out what may be wrong with him. I am thinking a bacterial infection. Over a week ago, our Betta was not being as energetic as he normally is and wasn't too excited about food.
<First thing to do when tropical fish stop eating is check the heater. If the water is cold, their appetite stops. Bettas should be maintained at around 25-28 C/77-82 F. They also need warm air since they're air breathers. If the tank has a hood, the air will become warmed automatically, but open topped tanks (unwise with Bettas because they jump out) won't have this air warming facility, so placing the tank away from cold draughts is important. If you're happy the water temperature is within that range, the next thing to check is filtration. Grab an ammonia or nitrite test kit, and measure one or the other. Ammonia is sometimes misleading (tap water can have ammonia in it, rendered harmless by good quality water conditioner) so checking your tank water with a sample of tap water will indicate whether the ammonia levels are the same (fine) or the aquarium has more ammonia than the tap water (bad). Nitrite test kits are easier to use, but assume there's some biological filtration in the tank, since making nitrite is the first step in the filtration process. If you have a tank without biological filtration then nitrite tests might come our "safe" even though the water quality is terrible. That's because none of the waste produced by the fish has been turned into nitrite. But if you have biological filtration of some sort, the nitrite result is a very good indicator of what's going on. Anything above zero indicates the biological filter is overwhelmed: too few bacteria, too much waste. Increasing the flow rate can help, so can replacing some of the media with better quality media (Siporax and other premium brands will cram in more bacteria per cubic inch that standard sponges and noodles). But it may well be the filter is simply too small, or else some of the filter capacity is being filled with basically useless junk (carbon for example). Review, and act accordingly. Almost all mystery health problems with tropical fish are environmental, at least initially, so reviewing heating and filtration go a long way towards nipping problems in the bud.>
At first, he would spend most of his time either on top of his tank in different areas in the floating water sprite or he would be in his log. He would occasionally swim down to the bottom of the tank in the morning and evening, but usually just stayed at the top the rest of the day. The past two days, however, he has been staying around the same area at the top of the tank in the water sprite and barely moving. I can get him to eat a piece of food a day, but that is about it.
<So long as he's eating something, that's promising.>
His fins have been somewhat shredded for awhile, it started as occasional pinholes in his fins and turned to his fins being shredded. I tried to first treat that with more water changes and cappata leaves.
<I would remove these leaves while the fish isn't well. They're decomposing, which is why/how they release "good acids" into the water, but in the process the bacteria decomposing them are using up oxygen. Save them for when the tank is fine again, sure, but for now, they're a random factor you can't adequately assess.>
When that wasn't helping, I started to add Seachem StressGuard (this was about 3 weeks ago). After about a week of StressGuard, he seemed to slow down some but would perk back up after a water change.
<A good sign the environment is amiss.>
So I stopped the StressGuard just after 1.5 weeks to see if it was affecting him. But about a week ago, he starting to slow down and start staying at the top of the tank. First, I was doing daily water changes and added the Betta Spa packets in his tank.
<I would lay off these, too. Bettas don't need magic water. They are thoroughly domesticated fish (like Goldfish) that can/do thrive in properly warmed and filtered tap water. Adding extra potions is yet again another unknown factor that makes assessing the tank difficult. Let's cut to the chase here. Fish product marketers know that the majority of Betta owners
are inexperienced aquarists who don't want to spend much money. They know these people try to keep Bettas in very small tanks or bowls, and then avoid buying heaters and filters. But what the average Betta buyer will do is spend money periodically on stuff that will supposedly keep their Betta healthy despite the shortcomings of their aquarium or bowl. Easier to get these folks to spend $10 every month for a year than $100 up front, hence the massive range of Betta-specific but low-cost items out there. None of which are necessary! In, say, an 5-8 gallon tank with a heater and filter, a Betta is really no harder to keep than a Guppy, will eat plain vanilla fish food, needs nothing added to the water beyond water conditioner, and is not even remotely fussy about water chemistry. Make sense?>
I had also added a poly filter pad to his filter in case there is something in the water (it turned tan/brown). I have since removed the PolyFilter since I am medicating his tank.
<Correct move. Ditto carbon. Both these, as well as large quantities of decaying organic matter, can affect the efficaciousness of medicines.>
Since I have already lost a Betta this year to what first seemed like constipation but I believe may have been a bacterial infection (which was housed in the same tank), I first added Metronidazole to some frozen brine shrimp for him to eat in case he also has a bacteria infection. He had the Metronidazole for 3 days until he wouldn't eat it and after a day, I switched to Kanaplex and added that to his water. I added the second dose of Kanaplex this morning and he hasn't really moved. Look wise, I cannot see anything wrong with him except for the shredded fins.
<Typically a sign of Finrot, but can also be fin damage. Is the shredding clean, like someone chopped his fins with a knife? Or are the fins patches with dead which patches and some orange or red areas of inflammation? The latter is bacterial Finrot, the former physical damage.>
He has not lost any color, his fins aren't clamped and he is not bloated.
He does have some disfigurement from birth, I am assuming. He does not have his ventral fins and his right gill has stuck out some.
<This is a quite common birth defect, yes.>
He is about 9 to 10 months old, from a local fish store that gets their Bettas from a local breeder. We have had him for 2.5 months.
<Do bear in mind Bettas are near enough annual fish in the wild. They should live a bit longer in captivity than this, perhaps 2 years on average, with odd specimens living well past that. Yours is middle aged rather than old then. Bettas do become less active with age though.>
His tank is a cycled 15 gallon tank. The temperature is between 79 and 81 degrees. He lives with ember tetras, cherry shrimp, MTS and Spixi snails.
<Can you move out the Ember Tetras? Characins generally are sometimes nippy towards Bettas, and Ember Tetras have been confirmed as occasional fin-nippers. If you must mix fish with Bettas, stick with peaceful bottom dwellers such as Corydoras, or harmless surface dwellers like Hatchets.>
Everyone else is doing well and the MTS and shrimp are continuously breeding.
<Good.>
He usually eats Omega One Betta Buffet flakes (2 to 3 small flakes), twice a day, since he has trouble eating the pellets. He also gets his diet supplemented with frozen brine shrimp, bloodworms and mysis shrimp about 3 times a week. Right now, I am trying to give him some flakes and/or brine shrimp to see what he will eat. We do weekly water changes of 25% to 30%.
Water parameters are:
Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0
Nitrate: 10
pH: 7.6
Hardness (GH): 5
Alkalinity (KH): 6
His tank has Seachem Onyx Sand Substrate with live plants, driftwood, ADA Dragon Scale stone and PetSmart decor. The filter is an Aqueon QuietFlow 10 power filter. We are thinking of changing to a stronger filter.
<A decent little filter. A bigger filter might not be necessary here if ammonia and nitrite are zero. Of course more filtration is always nice, but the flip side is that Bettas dislike currents, being adapted to ponds and ditches.>
Could something be wrong with the tank itself since we had another Betta in this tank that got bloated and then died a couple of months later? Everyone else in the tank are doing well. Or could it be something else besides a bacterial infection? Right now, I am treating him is his normal tank since everyone else is doing well with the treatments. Am I using the right
medication? If there is a harmful bacteria in the tank, would a UV sterilizer help?
<No. UV kills planktonic phases of various life forms, primarily algae and protozoan parasites. It doesn't cure already sick fish, and even though it suppresses the life cycle of things like Whitespot, it rarely eliminates them 100%. Outside of retail/wholesale situations where slowing the spread of disease saves money, there's little to no use for UV in freshwater
aquaria.>
He is still a young fish and I really want to save him. If need to, we can set up another tank for him but that still doesn't tell me what the problem may be.
Thank you for any help you can give me.
Stacy
<If the fins are clean shredded, I'd be looking at the Ember Tetras. Try removing them or the Betta, and see what happens. Medicate as per Finrot, and if he gets better, then that's the problem! Cheers, Neale.>

Re: Betta With Unknown Illness        12/10/15
I have a picture attached from today so you can see his fins. His fins have red in them, so it is hard to know if there are red inflamed areas.
<You're looking for pale red, pink even... rather than the deep cherry red to purple-red you see on Bettas.>
Does that look like fin nipping or bacterial fin rot?
<Physical damage certainly; fin-nipping a definite possibility.>
Can fin rot cause a fish to be listless?
<Yes; more psychological than anything else... lack of security, so the fish feels nervous or unsettled.>
That is my main concern of his symptoms.
<Understood.>
What would be the best medicine for fin rot? I am treating with Kanaplex.
Is that a good medicine? I haven't seen any change yet and he has one more dose. Should I do another round of Kanaplex or try a new medicine after this one? I need a medicine that is also safe for shrimp and snails. I also want a medicine that won't kill the beneficial bacteria.
<Some type of antibiotic should be safe with shrimps and snails. Avoid, specifically, medications with copper, formalin and organic dyes
(such as Methylene blue, malachite green, etc.). Ideally, separate the snails/shrimps from the fish during treatment. All this said, once the fin-nippers are removed, the fins should heal without medication.
Cheers, Neale.>

Sick Betta      9/18/15
Hello Crew!
<Hello Gabby>
First of all, I would just love to thank you for your wonderful site, which has more than once saved the lives of my fish. Your work is amazing. I can only hope to one day know enough about fish to be able to spread the love.
<Ahh; I hope for this as well>
I am writing to you because I am fortunate enough to work in a pet store, and I recently exchanged a Betta I'd owned for several months for a beautiful white-and-purple delta tail. My Betta had grown large and healthy with me after I healed him of fin rot (thank you, salt dips), he was enormous compared to the other Bettas and was in tip top shape, always eating and not easily rattled.
This new fish, however, has something the matter with him. He seems active enough, but red spots have begun to appear on his head and the top of his body, and he won't touch food (he'll follow my hand when I drop it in, but won't eat it). He will sometimes bend his tail sideways and swim in a circle, and small round holes have appeared near the edges of his fins which become ragged as the holes spread. Salt dips do not appear to have helped much. He seems alert and active, but I'm concerned--I don't want to lose him, and he is so gorgeous, I don't want him to lose any more fin!
<Mmm; the "red spots" worry me.... What could this be? Parasitic perhaps; bacterial?>

He is in a 2.5 gallon tank which I clean daily, in the company of two small Cryptocorynes and some white silica sand. He has no heater, but since I live in Cancun, he sure doesn't need one.
<I would add for the duration of treatment here>
Other than at the holes, his fins appear intact, his colors are bright and when he isn't doing his weird spinning act, he swims normally, exploring the tank. I am going to add more plants soon.
<I would leave off w/ live plants here for the while>
What can I do? I only have salt, malachite green, Methylene blue, and Furan-2 capsules, all of which were already tried in combination when the red spots first appeared (for every liter I added 1 drop of malachite green, 4 drops of Methylene blue and half a teaspoon of aquarium salt; then I took a Furan-2 capsule, broke it open and made a paste with the powder which I then rubbed on the red spots. I put a drop of the paste into his water and mixed that in too. It didn't appear to do anything for him.) Since then, I've given him a daily 5-minute salt dip in a liter of water with a teaspoon of aquarium or non-iodized table salt dissolved in it; even though it doesn't appear to be doing anything, at least the fin rot seems to be progressing very slowly.
What can I do? Please, I don't want to lose him :( I've been told to try Sulfast 3, but can I use it in conjunction with Furan-2? Should I give that to him again? Why won't he eat? (I just brought him home two days ago; he was at the pet store where I work.) Our water here is quite hard, but I keep it clean, and my other Betta lived without a problem.
<I would treat w/ a dose (single) of BOTH Metronidazole and Praziquantel (administered to the water as the fish is not eating; while raising the temperature of the water to the mid-80's F>
Thank you in advance for your reply! :)
<Welcome; thank you for sharing. Bob Fenner>
Sick Betta      9/18/15

Thanks so much Mr. Fenner!
<Welcome Gabby>
I just have a couple more questions your answer raised in my mind... Those medicines you mentioned... The vet here has them in injectable form for dogs and cats, or in suspension. There's also General Cure which has Metronidazole, should I use that?
<Yes to the powder form/s; not injectable>
Or how much is a dose?
<Please search, read on WWM Re.... need to dilute if treating in small volume/s>
My tank is 10L, but to treat him I'd move him back to the LFS where I work. How long should
I keep him at eighty degrees?
<Mid-80's... for the duration... likely a week or two>
Thank you once more! You guys are awesome!!!
<Certainly welcome. BobF>
Re: Sick Betta      9/18/15

Hello again, Mr. Fenner! :)
<Ms. Reyez>
I was only able to find Metronidazole, in 500mg tablets (for people), or in General Cure; but Praziquantel remains elusive. Can I use the tablets?
<Yes; crush up with two spoons; to hasten dissolving>
Will it work without Praziquantel?
<The Prazi is for worm diseases of many types.... works independently of the Metro (which is for Protozoans, some bacteria). Really need both>
Only the vet seems to have that, and she has it in injectable form or in suspension.
<Not the same>
The Betta's eyes now look swollen and strange. I don't wanna lose him :(
<See WWM re adding a bit of Epsom Salt>
Sorry for the bunch of questions. I've never treated a fish before with anything not meant for fish, and I'm scared to kill him :(
<No worries>
Thank you again!
<Welcome. B>

My beta fish needs help!  No data; child       2/19/15
Got my birthday I revived a blue male beta fish. His name is Minho. The problem is we have a cat, a cat who likes fish! While I was at school my cat got into the tank and I don't really know what she did! When I got home no his fins looked very droopy, and he's been staying at the bottom of his tank. I watched him earlier and when he tried to swim he barely moved!!!
Please tell me what I can do to help him! PLEASE!
<Is the aquarium heated? Bettas are tropical fish, and won't heal properly if conditions aren't right. Of course if you live in Singapore in an unheated flat, then ambient air temperature (around 80 degrees F) will be fine, but if you live in the US or Europe, then a heater is essential. Oh, and a filter too, and at least 4-5 gallons of water. Any aquarium that satisfies these criteria will have a hood or lid of some sort... or if it doesn't, you can get a piece of glass or clear acrylic cut to size to fit
on top. Simple. If you don't have heat, filtration or enough space, well, this fish was going to die sooner or later, and all the cat is doing is speeding up the process. Without wanting to sound callous, we do get a lot of "OMG my Betta is sick" messages and they're from folks who don't provide heat, proper water quality or enough space. Maybe you've met these people?
They keep Bettas in jars or bowls, stick them under an angle-poise lamp, that sort of thing. Maybe voice some baloney about Bettas living fine in jars (true, if you're a breeder in a heated fish room who changes the water daily, but not true otherwise). If you're teeth are on edge hearing such things, then great, you and I are going to get on well. Your Betta will recover in a heated, filtered aquarium. My advice: keep the hood on. Cats aren't good at opening aquarium hoods. If the Betta gets white or grey specks on its fins, they could be Finrot or Fungus, both common on damaged fish, and both eminently treatable. Something like Kanaplex will do the job nicely. Avoid the tea-tree oil remedies like Melafix as they tend to be good money after bad. Ditto salt; it's irrelevant here. Remove carbon from the filter while medicating. Keep the Betta nice and warm (in fact, upping the heat to around 82 F/28 C would actually speed the healing process up a bit). Hmm... does this help Maddie? Meantime, read here: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/betta_splendens.htm
In a heated, filtered aquarium your Betta has a good chance of recover. By the way, it's Betta to rhyme with "better", not "beater" or the Greek letter Beta. Comes from a Southeast Asian (Thai, perhaps?) name along the lines of "Bettah". Now you can impress your friends with your correct pronunciation of these lovely fish! Cheers, Neale.>

Thick white stripe on Betta fin?      12/28/14
Hello WWM.
<Laura>
I would like to inquire about my Betta fish which I have had for about 2 years.
He is in a 30 gallon heated tank (80 C), with a filter.
There are also 6 Corydoras and 5 tetras in the tank, and I do weekly 25% water changes.
<Good>
My concern is a thick white line that has been forming along his anal fin for several months.
There is a very similar picture on your website to the one I have attached, although after reading the post and independent research, I am still unsure as to diagnosis and treatment for my own fish.
>Okay<
(If you are interested in the other post, entitled “white stripe Betta”, here is the link: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/betdisfaq7.htm)
<Real good>
My Betta has also been quite lethargic, and lies at the bottom of the tank.
I don’t really see him swimming around anymore.
(I am carefully monitoring that the current from the filter isn’t too strong. He is not bloated.)
His face area seems paler, but he is still eating.

I am assuming it is not fin rot, because the site is localized, and not ragged or dark.
It does not appear to be fungus, as it is not fuzzy or an external growth.
Please correct me if I could be wrong about the following information.
There is no past stress or injury to my Betta fish that I am aware of, and I have not observed any tail nipping from tankmates.
Any input as to what is wrong or possible treatment would be greatly appreciated!
Thank you for your time,
Laura.
<Well; the decolonization is a concern, but especially the "jaggedness" of the rear portion of the anal concerns me... That and some loss of pigment to the head area and the behavior lead me to consider a bacterial involvement here; but not primary. Something is more at root/base... Likely some aspect/s of water quality and/or nutrition which you give no details of. Are you using some chemical supplements here? An algicide? Are all the decor items aquarium-safe? Please list/detail. Please supply this data. Bob Fenner> 

Re: Thick white stripe on Betta fin?      12/29/14
I purchased a water test kit today. Here are the results...
General hardness: 0
Carbonate hardness: 0
<? No hardness?
I'd check this kit against a sample that you know has GH, KH... can add baking soda for the carbonate>
pH: 6.5
Nitrate and Nitrite: 0
I usually feed him 2 beta pellets, and occasionally a dried bloodworm
<Mmm; I'd be reading re Betta nutrition on WWM>
instead. I also fast him once a week.
I do not use chemical supplements or algicide.
<Good>
Aquarium decor consists solely of sand, java fern, and soft driftwood.
<The driftwood may be toxic. I'd remove it for now>
P.S. Now he DOES look bloated, and his stomach is silvery and pale.
I will do another 25% water change and clean the filter media (using tank water) tomorrow.
Once again, thank you for your time.
<Glad to help. Bob Fenner>
Re: Thick white stripe on Betta fin?
      12/29/14
OK. I have read up on beta nutrition, and will be changing the feeding
routine :)
<Ah, good>
I plan to give him a pea tomorrow.
Would it be a good idea to move him to a hospital tank and treat him with antibacterial meds?
<Mmm; am typically very conservative re these sort of choice, but if this were my Betta, I would do so... Likely a broad spectrum gram negative... See WWM re these as well>
P.S. What would make the aquarium driftwood toxic?
<And this... there are MANY compounds (akin to cigarette smoking) that can come out of decomposing woods of many kinds>
-L
<B>

Re: Thick white stripe on Betta fin?      12/29/14
All right. Thank you for your expertise Mr. Fenner. I will take into account everything you have shared with me in this process.
I will also keep your website in mind for myself and any other fish keepers as a valuable resource in the future.
-L
<Cheers, BobF>

A Betta turning grey-is he sick ?      12/21/14
I have 3 adopted Bettas. All imported privately, the owner downsized and I took them on. They'd all had fin rot but were cured. He kept them in bare tanks and was sloppy with water changes.
<Indeed.>
I keep them in 2.5 G tanks.
<Would recommend larger, with filters. Air-powered sponges the ideal.
Bettas in 5+ gallon tanks rarely get sick.>
Heavily planted, bare bottoms, usually with oak or almond leaves. After experimenting for some time, using daily water tests, discovered water parameters were remaining very stable. 0, 0, <10. I have concluded that enough BB are colonizing the tank surfaces to handle the output of one fish. If not, I don't think I'd be seeing nitrates. I do partial changes every week or two mainly to clean the bottom much and refresh minerals, buffers, etc. pH is slightly acidic, just below 7.
<Do try and maintain pH at 7 or slightly above. Filter bacteria thrive best between pH 7.5 and 8.5, and below 7 they are demonstrably working less well, and below 6 barely at all. A pH around 6.5 to 7 is not a big deal in a spacious aquarium with light stocking, but I would only recommend if you absolutely needed an acidic pH. Do remember that fish don't feel pH, they
feel hardness, so soft, neutral water chemistry is often the ideal for Southeast Asian tropical fish because it balances osmoregulation (low hardness) with acceptable water quality (non-acidic pH).>
I feed almost entirely live or frozen. One of them won't touch dry foods at all.
<Worth persisting with... how to state clearly?... mixing frozen foods is okay but hard to ensure total array of vitamins and minerals unless a marine aquarium vitamin supplement is used. But modern flakes and micropellets are excellent staples, and the premium brands, such as New Life Spectrum, accepted by virtually everything.>
Blackworms, brine shrimp, fruit flies and their larvae, springtails, all live. Frozen daphnia, brine shrimp, blood worms sometimes. They don't much like the frozen bloodworms. Live mosquito larvae if I can catch them in summer.
<Good.>
Room is very warm, tanks not heated or filtered.
<Do not approve of this. Never understood why Bettas are supposed to "magically" not need filters where other fish do. If water is changed daily, pretty much all of it, then yes, breeders do keep Bettas in jam jars, in Asia and elsewhere that vast numbers are maintained and mortality of individuals is not a major concern. But pet Bettas need consistently better conditions. Heat, filtration, swimming space for exercise.>
Temp usually 78-80F. Run fans if it gets much warmer than this, have lighting on timers, 12/12. Heat in this apartment is a ongoing pain, rotten landlord.
<Shouldn't be a major problem, but higher temperatures mean faster metabolism, which means more dissolved metabolites in the water... again, filtration would help.>
Ruffles is a deep blue/mustard gas Dragon HM. He was fine 'til days ago. He is still eating normally, his behaviour has not changed, I don't see anything alarming other than this colour change. Started on the head, pinky size spot. Two days later, dime sized. Spreading over his back and downward now. Blue scales are a darkish grey colour.
<Does occasionally happen for no apparent reason (perhaps genes) but do consider ammonia "burns" as per Goldfish in unfiltered tanks, as well as excess mucous production, which can be caused by all sorts of things, from Costia through to dramatic dives in water quality. Without a photo, hard to be sure what you're even describing.>
No raised scales, no bloat, still eating, but this grey colour is not what I associate with health. I don't like to medicate unless I'm fairly sure what I'm medicating for. If this is bacterial, what would be most likely as a cause ? I can't seem to find out if this kind of colour change is normal.
He's a very handsome fish, won't be two years old for a few months yet.
Any help appreciated.
Thanks, Karen
<Various concerns about the environment and maintenance as outlined above would be my first line of investigation... nothing you've described clearly defines one particular problem, less so one specific parasite or infection. Law of big numbers with sick fish means environment is always the prime suspect, especially where there are obvious shortcomings. Review, read, and act accordingly. Cheers, Neale.>
Re: A Betta turning grey-is he sick ?        12/21/14

Thanks for the quick reply. I can provide sponge filters if you think that's best, I have some that should be finished seeding by now, sitting in cycled tank for a few weeks now. I was planning on dividing a 10G for these 3 fish, as it happens. I do not have room for three 5Gs.. one other Betta is in a 5G and ideally I'd prefer to give them each a 5. Thanks to ongoing problems with a landlord, I can't do that at the moment. But if Ruffles is sick, I don't want him sharing water with two healthy fish in
the 10G either. I'm working on the tank dividers now.
<Given the situation, that sounds like a good workaround. Though until the "Ruffles" Betta gets better, you won't want to mix him with the healthy fish.>
Just so you know, I do not think that Betta fish 'magically' don't need filters.
<Good!>
When I first took them on, I did 3x weekly partial water changes, as I did not have filters on hand at the time. Due to a new, badly torn shoulder tendon, it became very difficult to maintain those changes. I had already added a large number of plants to their tanks, which grew very well and my daily testing showed the parameters, [ and I do mean daily testing]
remaining at 0, 0 and <10. I spent about two months experimenting with the number of water changes, always testing every day, because I sure didn't want to expose the fish to ammonia. I've never had any ammonia or nitrite show up. So I did fewer changes, but continued daily testing to be sure.
<Sounds like you're doing your best.>
If I'm dead wrong in doing fewer water changes, even with the tested parameters, ok, I'll find some way to do more of them.. I'm doing a one third change every other day now for Ruffles. But given the consistent test results, I did think doing fewer changes was not harming the fish.
<Possibly, but it's really hard to be sure. Nature doesn't hand out 'get out of jail free cards' unfortunately, so even when we're unable to do certain pieces of aquarium maintenance, the fish will carry on polluting the tank anyway. Finding what works for you is important of course, this is meant to be a hobby, not a chore. But at the same time keep an open mind, and think about ways you can optimise water quality within the constraints you have... less food, slightly cooler water to reduce metabolism, use of air-powered sponge filters, stocking tanks with fast-growing plants to absorb NH3... various options.>
Tap water here is hard and alkaline. pH about 7.5. GH very high, KH quite high. Don't recall the exact numbers, but I recall thinking the stuff was like liquid rock. But lately, all my tanks seem to be down to a pH of 7 and sometimes just slightly under 7. The tests are not 100% accurate, I know. The tap water is still 7.5, so the drop is puzzling to me.
<Generally speaking, you can ignore pH. Focus on the (general) hardness. So long as the carbonate hardness is above, say, 5 degrees KH, any pH changes between water changes will be minimal. Hardness ("soft", "medium hard" or "hard" for example) is what matters to your fish. If that's stable, your fish will be fine.>
Other tanks are filtered, I clean them regularly, do regular, fairly large water changes using a Python, which won't reach the Betta tanks. Fish and shrimp [ I have a lot of shrimp, Bamboo, Vampire, Cherry, Babaulti ], are all healthy, having babies, moulting without problems. Snails, about 16 species, all healthy, good shells, reproducing, except those needing brackish water for reproduction.
<I see.>
I'm aware the BB don't function as well in acid conditions. I was thinking of adding a tiny bit of crushed coral in a bag to see if that would push the pH slightly upward.
<It will, by raising carbonate hardness, and thereby buffering against pH drops.>
I feed the shrimp and snails calcium blocks, and feed a mix of dry and live food. I'm no expert on water chemistry, but I thought hard water like ours was supposed to be pretty resistant to pH dropping. Tap water source is Lake Ontario.
<If carbonate hardness is high, yes, pH drops are rare. But of course very high rates of acidification can use up the buffering capacity of even carbonate hard water. High nitrate and phosphate are good proxies for acidification, but so also are accumulations of organic detritus and excessive use of wood, peat or dried leaves for decor.>
I'm not opposed to dry food, but two of the Bettas are. One won't touch it, the other only takes if it he's starving. That's why I feed them live/frozen. I can soak frozen stuff in vitamins if that's going to improve nutrition, I'll try to get some today.
<Worth a shot. Farmed Bettas were presumably reared on dried foods, so why your chaps are so awkward escapes me.>
I will try to send a pic, I simply have zero experience at getting them off the camera into the computer. The grey area is spreading, but I see no necrosis, no redness, no swelling, no changes in behaviour. Just more deep
blue scales turning dark grey every day. Activity is as usual, eating well still.
I'll see if I can figure out how to get pics to you.
Thanks, Karen
<Welcome. Neale.>
Re: A Betta turning grey-is he sick ?        12/21/14

Many thanks for the comments on water chemistry. I did have leaves in the Betta tanks, though not at the moment. So I won't replace them. Will get vitamins and put in sponge filters. Tomorrow they're coming for another
round of pest control, so I have to seal up all the tanks, among other preparations. Such a pain!
<Indeed.>
Hoping for the best where Ruffles is concerned.
Karen
<Glad to offer some food for thought. Good luck, Neale.>
Re: A Betta turning grey-is he sick ?        12/21/14

<PS. Airborne toxins are especially dangerous to Bettas. Insecticides and other poisons (anti-fungals for example) can be lethal to all fish, but because Bettas breathe air directly, they're far more exposed to such airborne chemicals as most other fish. If this/these chemical/s have been used previous, I would not discount them as a possible cause of health problems. Cheers, Neale.>

Unidentified Betta infection     /RMF       12/12/14
Dearest WetWebMedia,
I'm writing in regards to my male Betta splendens, who is afflicted by some sort of infection. I have spent days and days doing research and reading all over the web, as well as even posting my fish's condition on a few forums. No one seems to really know what the deal is with my little guy, nor what to do next. I'll give a bit of background history about his
environment, as well as the condition, and try to be as specific as I can.
<Good>
First, he was brought home and introduced into a 6 Gallon Fluval Edge (cycled), received water changes each and every week (religiously, for sure), and dechlorinated with Seachem Prime. All was well until I purchased, or "saved" rather, a second Betta. The second purchased Betta was on his last leg, and clearly suffering with fin rot, and lying on the bottom of his cup when I brought him home.
<? You didn't put these two together I hope/trust>
After a few weeks into introducing the second fish, and sharing water changing equipment with my first Betta purchased, I noticed that he then developed some signs of rot on his anal fin, despite the pristine conditions in his tank?? And so I read a bit, and realized that it was certainly possible that the bacteria was simply spread to him via the water changing equip. That was that. I increased water changes throughout the week, and he soon cleared up. The next appearance of deterioration is what is baffling me.
<Mmm>
He then started showing signs of, what I can only describe as, streaking?
He literally started to lose the colored tissue between the rays only(edges of fins completely normal and healthy). I thought perhaps it was a rip or minor tear from a decor item, however, the streaky loss of color/fin tissue continued to disappear in a vertical pattern all the way across his anal fin, as well as the dorsal fin. No amount of water changes were improving his condition, and as this rot-like deterioration continued to get too close to his body for my liking. I was recommended to try Kanaplex, as it was a good, broad spectrum medication said to be least harmful to organs and such.
During treatment the deterioration did in fact stop, and when the round of dosing was complete it seemed that he was successfully regaining the color/membrane by the day. Unfortunately, approx. 18 days after the last dose the same deterioration began all over again. A section of his dorsal fin, again between the rays only, started to lose color and deteriorate towards the body, as well as a bit of area just inward from the edge of his tail. Whatever this is shows up at first as a small speck of "emptiness" between rays, looking to be a small tear, and gradually eats its way downward and upward, section by section. Regardless of a clean, cycled tank, it still rapidly gets worse. It appears that the gram negative medication is in deed targeting the issue, but it's coming back regardless.
<Mmm; what re your water quality... particularly water temp.? What do you have the heater set at? What do you feed this fish?>
I've never seen another example of this kind of infection, (nor have some very experienced/high level members on some well known forums) as most fin rot I've researched always hits the edges as well, and doesn't happen in a pattern-like deterioration. Unfortunately, the medication had caused a mini cycle, and when I realized I would have to try the Kanaplex again I decided to put him into hospital tank. The Fluval is finally back on track, but I'm just not sure how to proceed. He's showing improvement (again) with use of the Kanaplex, but I can't just keep medicating him should it return once again. Any idea what this condition is?
<Mmm; some "tattering" of unpaired finnage does "just happen" with this species; but the white-ness in the first pic... does concern me>
I'm now hesitant to even put him back in his main tank again once the med. is complete, for fear that the bacteria is somehow lingering around and will just attack him once again. I've attached a few photos for you to see the damage afflicting him. Hopefully you may know more about what could be causing this, and whether or not his main tank will even be a possibility again once he's through his round of meds this time. I'm a new fishkeeper and am not really sure how the bacterial infections affect the tank.
Perhaps that's what made him come down with this again?
<Much more likely there's an environmental, nutritional component/s at play here>

Thank you for your help. I certainly look forward to hearing what you think.
Best regards,
Ashley Whitzell
*The first photo was the first round of this infection before treating him.
The next two are the return of the infection, and the increased spreading over a span of
just 3 days!*
<Data please. Bob Fenner>


Re: Unidentified Betta infection /Back to RMF       12/13/14
Hello, Bob,
First, thank you so very much for responding to my question, and so very promptly ; ) I'm at a loss regarding how to proceed with my little guy, and any assistance/guidance is most, most appreciated.
<Well; please allow me to state from my practical and academic background how one might proceed. Sampling of the whited out area, culturing on a few stock media (ala Bergey's Manual), microscopic examination w/ some staining (H and E likely will do)... and sensitivity trials with just filters hole-punched and soaked in dilute solutions of commonly available broad-spectrum antibiotics. Now, these years, some decades later, maybe there's some sort of Star Trek tri-corder or such that can/will do the above in short order. What doesn't bear doing is just pouring in medication/s and hoping for the best>
I have lost a many nights sleep over this, and despite much research, and post reading from others' Betta experiences with infection, I still have no sense of peace/assurance that he's going to be okay, and I'm resolving the issue completely.
<Good>
Okay, so here's the requested data:
- He is in fact alone/not even in the same room as my other Betta's aquarium
<Good>
- The tank is heated with a Fluval shatterproof heater that stays at a consistent 78/79 degrees, as it's non-adjustable
<Mmm... I DO like such units as they're relatively fail-safe and useful for small volumes, I DON'T like them in that when one really needs to raise the temp., they cannot>
- Upon first purchasing him, I chose Hikari Bio-Gold pellets, and alternated w/Hikari freeze-dried bloodworms about once/twice a wk. and one day of fasting
<Ok>
When he fell ill, I read that protein/quality was pertinent to boost immunity, and so we switched both fish to New Life Spectrum's Thera+ pellets
<A good choice>
As for the tank itself, I've faithfully changed water each wk. and tested w/an API master kit each time (which is also how I noticed the spike in Ammonia, then ultimately Nitrite) mini cycle? which I'm assuming was an affect of the medication,
<Too likely so>
as it happened shortly after his round of Kanaplex dosing. I then started testing
each/every day, and doing appropriate water changes to keep parameters safe for him. The PH has always been about 7.6, and high PH 7.4/7.5 He actually showed the signs of illness returning before the mini cycle occurred, so I can say with certainty that it unrelated to its return. When left with no answers, and no real direction as to how to proceed next, I decided to put him into a hospital tank before starting the Kanaplex again, as my tank was still reading .25ppm nitrite,
<Toxic of/by itself... could be the major source of trouble here... "just a burn">

and I wanted to let things take their course in his main tank before adding more med. to the water, and possibly altering things all over again. And so he's been in a makeshift hospital tank, unfortunately uncycled, since Tuesday, as my water has only now since finished cycling after he was put in there, but I've been performing diligent water changes/maintaining medication within, as to keep his hospital tank water free of ammonia/nitrites
<Good; just partials though... to not forestall the establishment of nitrogen et al. cycling... AND I'd utilize other means of bacterial supplementation. Read here: http://wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/fwestcycling.htm

We're really just at a complete loss here, as I've followed a strict routine/maintaining water quality and testing, and even started keeping a log of his tank parameters when we first got him in good practice. It's very unfortunate to think that the introduction of the second Betta has caused all of this, but it's the only thing that changed, and coincided with the time of his illness appearing. It seems as though the Kanaplex is successful in treating whatever
<No>
the infection is, but I obviously know it's not a solution, and can't keep repeatedly medicating him should he be put back into the main tank, and ultimately be reinfected.
Saying that I'm "upset" over the situation would be a great understatement. We literally feel helpless, and inexperienced, as far as how to proceed at this point. I tried to do everything correctly from day one. It's very discouraging, as we just don't know what exactly is wrong in the first place. On a personal note, the fact that I had spent the last 2 months at my Grandmother's bedside, as she passed slowly from Cancer, (which we knew was terminal/untreatable), I was going back and forth from the facility and my home to also care for my fish (water changes, medication dosing, etc.) So it hasn't helped to feel helpless in one situation, and yet again in this circumstance. You're knowledge and help is very much appreciated. I can't thank you enough for coming through to assist. We're just not ready for yet another loss, and want to do everything we can.
Most sincerely,
Ashley Whitzell
<So; what would I do; given the information provided, the apparent situation? All you are presently doing, PLUS get/use a heater to raise the temp. to 83-85 F. This of and by itself will very likely effect a cure as well as hasten cycling.
Bob Fenner>

Re: Unidentified Betta infection    12/14/14
Hello, Bob,
So I've read over your advice as to possibly curing my fish, and had a few questions regarding the steps. I'm currently reaching out to a few local aquarists in regards to the whole microscopic testing, as there's no way we could purchase our own microscope right now, unfortunately. As for establishing the cycle within my hospital tank, I wanted to get more info.
I was under the impression that, because the KanaPlex caused mini cycling in my main tank previously, it would be pointless of cycling his hospital tank, no? Or are you saying that I should in fact cycle because the main tank, with the presence of the infection, can't be used again? The mini cycling in my main tank has since completed, but I was hesitant to treat him within it, again dosing the KanaPlex, as it would just create another crash. Would it be beneficial to us the cycled media from the main tank in my hospital tank? Or would this just spread more infection into the hospital/temp. tank?
Again, thank you so very much for your assistance here.
Ashley Whitzell
<I would not continue antibiotic treatment on this fish; but place it back in the main tank, elevate temp., encourage cycling. B>
Re: Unidentified Betta infection    12/14/14

Okay, so the main tank did in fact finish cycling a few days ago, but I didn't want to put him back in, as the antibiotics would just cause another crash. I elevated the temp, as I did have a manual/adjustable heater on hand. But I'm wondering, if he'll simply be back in the tank with no medications, won't he just succumb to the illness, whatever it is?
<No; else I wouldn't suggest the move>
I also wanted to add that, the deterioration on fins has in fact gotten better (again) with the Kanaplex, but this time it appears differently than the first time it showed up. The areas of deterioration now almost look like there's yellowish lining the areas of rot? Do you think this could be a fungal infection that causing the rot in the first place? I don't know what it is, but I sort of feel like I'd be just waiting for him to pass if I don't try medication.
>Again, the 'scope, rdg<

Re: Unidentified Betta infection       12/16/14
Hello, again, Bob, Okay...So I should've thought of this sooner, but I suppose in all of the stress and worry over this fish I simply didn't think about it. My boyfriend is friends with a urologist in our area, and thought to ask him about the scope. He said "of course he has a microscope", and sure, we can use it. I hadn't even thought of him, and his line of work/using a scope probably fairly often. So my next question for you is in regards to the actual testing. I'm sure he more than likely has the H & E stain, as you said they're pretty basic stains. The issue at hand now would be how to go about this.
<This sampling procedure is archived, gone over and over on WWM... you can search there. But, you might want to invest in an e version of Ed Noga, Fish Disease; Diagnosis and Treatment. I believe Amazon has the 2d ed. for about ten US>
Do I simply put him on a dry,
<... not dry>
stable surface and snip a piece of the infected tail?
<No snipping>
Assuming he would be out of water for a moment, would I also need to use a utensil to gently do a skin scrape as well?
<The angled edge of a new glass slide>
It all seems very intimidating, and if at all possible, I'd want to try and avoid doing any kind of sedation/clove oil solution, if I don't have to.
<... don't have to>
Just wanted to see what your thoughts might be about proceeding with the sample.
All this for a simple Betta fish! Some would not go to such lengths to save a mere fish...but I suppose the vegetarian in me just makes me all the more persevering, and emotionally driven to help him. I've certainly grown attached to him, and would will do all I can as his owner, whether he lives for another 2 years, or just another month. Funny how a small creature in a box of water can still touch our lives. It's been hard, but it's also been a great learning experience.
<Yes; esp. about one's self. B>
Re: Unidentified Betta infection
       12/16/14
Bob, Sorry, I forgot to ask...once a piece of tail is removed, how would one safely preserve the sample in transit from my home to the office?
<Take the fish with you, sample, observe then/there>
Just not sure if keeping it in a sterile/clean container with some of the tank water would alter it, and if a smear from the body were also taken, how to properly store that as well? Our friend's office is close by so the transit wouldn't be lengthy, but not sure how oxygen and/or temp. would affect the actual sample so I wanted to ask. And you had mentioned before something about sensitivity testing. Would that mean having to buy different medications to add to the sample to see how it would affect
whatever might "swimming" on the slide?
<A simple H.S. experiment. You can search the Net re>
I sure hope not. I definitely don't have enough money this month to purchase several different kinds of medications to experiment with.
Regards,
Ashley

Strange gunk on Betta     11/26/14
I came home from school for Thanksgiving break. I went in to see my Betta male that I left home. I noticed he wasn't looking very well. He was sitting on the ground and his color looked faded. I checked his water temperature and the thermometer said it was 68 degrees and I also checked the under-gravel filter and it was filthy.
<Aquarium much too cold. Turn the heater up (or heaven forbid, "on" if someone has switched it off in your absence). As you hopefully know, Bettas are tropical fish, any anyone who tells you they can survive at room temperature is either (a) misinforming you or (b) living in the tropics where room temperature is tropical! Anything below 25 C/77 F is bad for Bettas, and below, say, 22 C/72 F quickly becomes lethal. I'm only stressing this point for the benefit of others reading this... you'd be surprised (saddened) how many people believe they don't need to provide their Betta with a heater, instead spouting out such nonsense as "this angle poise light over the top warms it up" or "it's bred to live in an unheated tank" or some such rubbish. Your Betta is almost certainly getting sick because of lack of heat. Fish are ectotherms, meaning the heat energy they need for normal metabolic processes comes from their environment (not internally, as it is with mammals and birds). If they're too cold, chemical reactions slow down below the necessary (safe) rate, and things like digestion and immune response stop working properly. Bacteria in the water that would normally be fended off by their immune system can run amok if the immune system is running at half speed, and the result is, of course, a sick fish. Finrot and Fungus are two classic responses to tropical fish being kept too cold, as are Whitespot infections.>
I did a 75% water change and cleaned the filter. I let him float in the new water for 20 minutes and then let him back in it. I then noticed he has some "gunk" on his left fin. I don't want to go out and buy a lot of chemicals if it isn't very serious and that could harm him even more.
<Indeed, that's a concern, but at the same time, medicines shouldn't be seen as an expense that can be avoided. In this situation though increasing water temperature and ensuring good water quality (as always, zero ammonia and zero nitrite) should do the trick, and if the fin damage/infection doesn't get worse, it should heal up in time. Using a reliable Finrot medication (Melafix wouldn't be my first choice here, despite its low cost and wide sale, but a proper antibiotic instead) is definitely worthwhile though. As ever, remove carbon from the filter during use otherwise the medicine probably won't work.>
I've had him for a year. I'm wondering if this is normal for older Betta fish or of it could be something serious.
<In an aquarium a Betta should live 2-3 years after purchase without too much trouble if given decent care. If the aquarium heater was turned down low, it may well be that over summer his water temperature was adequate, if not ideal, but now it's colder, he's really feeling the chill. Review, and act accordingly.>
I have a picture of it. I also noticed some black spots on his fin that i never noticed before. Are they normal or should i be concerned.
<Any dramatic changes in a fish are cause for concern, especially when linked to obviously bad environmental stress (such as lack of heat). Let me also direct you to Bob Fenner's book on keeping Bettas, here:
http://www.amazon.com/Betta-Success-long-term-Successful-Aquariums/dp/1494867818/ref=tmm_pap_title_0/185-1577819-1364304
For under $10 (or $6 on Kindle!) you get pretty much everything you need to know about Bettas in one place. Since Bettas are so widely kept, we know everything that's needed to keep them healthy. Heat, filtration, a decent sized aquarium (I'd argue at least 4-5 gallons, anything less being pretty pointless) and an appropriate diet. Read, understand, learn and reflect.
Cheers, Neale.>

Re: Strange gunk on Betta     11/26/14
Thanks Neal. I got him a heater and he does seem happier. i plan on changing up his diet to more then pellets for a more happier Betta
<Most welcome and glad he's a better Betta (which is alliterative in British English!). Cheers, Neale.>

Re: Strange gunk on Betta    11/28/14
Hi Neal. I'm happy to report that Ash (my Betta) is doing much better. He is happy in his 80 degree water and is eating and swimming around. I did buy the Melafix and put it in the tank and it is helping with the gunk on his fin (still not sure what it is).
<Do be careful with Melafix. It promises a lot, but as I've said many times on WWM, it doesn't always deliver. Because it's cheap, it's popular, but it isn't much beyond a half-decent preventative. Once fish actually get sick, I'm not convinced it cures anything with any certainty. Do remember fish, like humans, heal by themselves in many cases, where infection is only slight. So adding Melafix and seeing your fish get better doesn't mean Melafix cured the fish. In fact I'd place money on the heat being the helpful factor here.>
The spots I realized have been there the whole time (looked back at old photos and they were on his dorsal fin then to). I also got him some bloodworms as a treat and he loves them. Thanks for all your help.
<Most welcome. Neale.>

Strange white spots/cotton mouth? on my Platys and Betta; plus  broken link
> I tried looking at the article mentioned on
> http://www.wetwebmedia.com/before/index.htm  
> 'The vast majority of times fish get sick, the disease involved is
> whitespot, velvet, finrot, fungus, or the shimmies. Use this article to
> establish which disease is causing your problems, and then select the
> appropriate treatment.'
> Unfortuantely when I click on 'this article' I get a 404, same with
> 'select' so hopefully this email wont be too out of place.
> <Thank you for this. Will take a look/see>
> A quick history, I'm new to aquarium keeping, and had thought things were
> pretty settled out when I went out and purchased some additional fish and
> plants for my 50G/200L tank. The day after putting the plants in (rinsed
> in RO water, but guess not good enough) I found all of my shrimp upside
> down on the bottom of the tank, some floundering around.
> <? What from the plants themselves would cause this?>
> I panic'd and added too much Tetra Aqua Safe (Water/metal treatment) which
> allowed a few of the shrimp to recover, but then caused havoc with the
> fish. I did man water changes over a week and also upgraded the HOB filter
> that came with the tank to an Eheim Ecco pro canister. After a week of
> trouble things appeared to be as good as ever with happy fish swimming
> around. During the challenging time I lost one of the new platys and one
> of the new guppies I had bought for the tank.
> <Mmm; how long has this tank been set up? Best to let all run a week or
> more before introducing any life... then allow the system to become
> established in terms of cycling.... before stocking more>
> A week passes and yesterday I look at my tank and find my betta with a
> funny gray/white chin/mottled blue face instead of the black it has been.
> The other new platy I bought a few weeks ago has a funny white fuzzy stuff
> on his mouth, and now I'm anxious it might be Columnaris that will wipe out
> my tank.
> <May be... but...>
> I've isolated the platy and betta to another smaller tank but now in
> looking closer at my other fish I am seeing little white spots that almost
> look like paint on some, and I *think* maybe holes or skin damage on the
> other platys. Unfortunately Im too new to this to really know if what Im
> looking is normal fish anatomy or something going horribly awry.
> <Just stress... from the system being new, water quality issues>
> Here's a 2 second video of the platy with the funny mouth
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfQ56mRgdzY (I couldnt get a photo
> unfortunately)
> Here's a few photos of the platy, betta and guppies. Would love if you
> could tell me if I'm hallucinating or if everything is ok? I keep reading
> about a specific antibiotic Kanamycin but have no idea how I can get it
> here in the UK ?
> <Am going to ask Neale; who lives in Britain... for better input here>
> Anyway, thank you very much for any insight you can provide!
> -Crh
> <I encourage patience, and no medicine introduction at this juncture. Your
> fish's troubles are not likely pathogenic, but environmental. Treating may
> well make matters worse. Perhaps a good general freshwater book to read for
> now.
> Bob Fenner>
Re: Strange white spots/cotton mouth? on my Platys and Betta

<<Bob’s covered the basics, but some thoughts. Excess mucous production and/or poor mechanical filtration (i.e., removal of silt rather than ammonia) can cause fish to appear speckled out cloudy even though they’re not sick. Replacing the mechanical filter media, checking for an irritant (such as copper or incorrect/sudden changes in pH), and the use of flocculants (sometimes called filter aids) can help. A series of large water changes is usually helpful where there are large quantities of silt, together with stirring/cleaning the substrate. Second though is the use of salt to stress freshwater parasites. While not an option for the Betta, you can easily up the salinity to one-quarter seawater and cause livebearers such as Platies and Guppies no harm at all. This will severely stress most ectoparasites (velvet, ick, even Costia) and to some degree can even help with bacterial infections (particularly where these are opportunistic). Mouth Fungus (the bacterial infection Columnaris) is always a possibility, though it is relatively easy to treat as per Finrot if caught early. Antibiotics such as Kanamycin cannot be legally obtained in the UK (or indeed most Western countries outside the US, and even in the US the free-for-all on antibiotics isn’t likely to persist for much longer; do see the issues with antibiotic resistance). However, you can obtain them from vets, typically for around £10-15, which is about 2-3 times the cost of generic aquarium treatments here. With that said, a product called eSHa 2000 is generally excellent against bacterial infections, much better than the other antibacterials I’ve used here (the Interpet one for example I’ve never had any success with). eSHa 2000 costs about £4-5 a pot and is very economical to use. It, and eSHa EXIT for external parasites, are the only two medications on sale in the UK that I use or recommend. Cheers, Neale.>>
Re: Strange white spots/cotton mouth? on my Platys and Betta

<<The Platy in the video looks like he’s damaged his mouth, got some dead skin there, but isn’t otherwise in trouble. If he can feed okay and is swimming about, I’d not worry overmuch. I’d look out for opportunistic infections, such as fungal infections, but good water quality (hard, alkaline chemistry too) should be all he needs. Low-end brackish conditions tend to minimise fungal infections, so if he’s in an all-livebearer tank, 3-6 gram/litre salinity could help. eSHa products widely sold; your local Maidenhead Aquatics for example should stock and be open Sunday. Cheers, Neale>>
Re: Strange white spots/cotton mouth? on my Platys and Betta

From the plants I believe it was pesticides used to keep snails/etc.. off them.
<Strange>
The tank has been setup for 6 weeks ish, ammonia is 0, nitrite is 0, nitrate is about 5-10.
Changing roughly 25% water once or twice a week and using (now) seachem prime to condition.
Could you see anything from the photo's or video that looked odd? Thanks!
<Not really; no. BobF>
-Crh 


More than full size

Healthy happy Betta dead within 24 hours - is it the end of my fishkeeping affair :-((     9/11/14
Dear WWM team,
<Irena,>
I've never believed that one is incapable of keeping fish, but despite my love for all things fish, it might, sadly, be true. You are pretty much my last hope before I stop this hobby for good, as the fish pet shops are of no help.
<Oh dear.>
Today my Betta fish which was happily swimming and eating yesterday is dead. He was living in a smaller Betta-tank for around 4 weeks. Initially
I did water changes of 80% weekly and then (after reading more about Bettas and considering a small size tank) was doing 100% change every 4 days.<Good. Please can I stress the point that the secret to Bettas is living space. Forget about the "living in jam jars" thing. Massively labour intensive approach. Instead get a tank around 5-10 gallons (20-40 litres) in size. Everything will become much, much easier if you do this.
Installing heaters, choosing the right filter, and providing enough volume of water to buffer against temporary problems or changes.>
I was feeding it 1 to 2 Betta pellets once a day with a fasting day once a week.
<Possibly not enough. Does depend upon filtration and tank size. In tanks without filters, even the smallest amount of food can cause water quality problems; in a 5-gallon tank with an adequate air-powered filter, overfeeding isn't that much of a risk after the first 4-6 weeks.>
The tank was sitting on the heating mat giving the temperature around 15oC (59oC).
<Much too cold. These fish come from Thailand. Hot, hot, hot! Something around 25 C/77 F is about right.>
Any further increase in the temperature was not recommended by the pet shop who sold me this fish.
<Useless advice.>
I always used Prime water conditioner, no bettafix etc.
<Good.>
Photo of the poor deceased fish is attached.
<Indeed.>
There was no ammonia / nitrate in the water. Nevertheless, when I noted him a bit lethargic and not eating this morning, I did another 100% water change. He stayed closed to the surface, but after a while started darting back and forth, clearly in distress, often falling on the bottom of the tank. By 6 pm today he was dead.
<Yes.>
There was no visible discoloration. On average I saw him changing colour a bit between day and night. I also noted horizontal lines on his body, more visible when he was pale in the morning.
<Colour changes at night are normal, but can also be associated with stress.>
As he was kept in our rather darkish kitchen / living area, I was using an electric lamp during the day, maybe this is the reason of his change of colour between day and night. I do not recall using any lotions or soaps around him. Also do not recall dipping fingers in the water. In fact
yesterday was his fasting day. Does it all sound odd?
<No.>
Is there such thing as bad luck in fish keeping?
<No. Like pretty much any skill, there's a set of things you need to do first to succeed. Reading helps. Getting a big enough tank, some source of heat, and proper filtration are the "holy trinity" of fishkeeping. Get them right, and the rest is child's play.>
Maybe I need to take any fish bowls form the kitchen area and try other area in the house??
<I would spend some time reading first.>
My previous (and very first Betta) lived for about a year in an unheated same tank with partial water changes. He slowly got discoloured and eventually passed away from what I though could be old age.
<Or luck that he survived so long... perhaps warmer weather (summer) meant his water was warmer than 15 degrees C?>
Below is my disastrous fish keeping history - as much as I love the hobby, I can't help feeling as a fish murderer. Maybe it is time to stop.
* First 3 gold fish bought in 2001. Lived in a plastic bowl for 2 years.
No filter, weekly partial changes. Had no problems for 2 years. Then they started slowly dying out. Once had constipation which was successfully treated and lived with me another year. The other two eventually passed away.
* Got another 2 gold fish in the same bowl, who were OK for the next 3 years, and then passed away. I believe it was dropsy.
<Bowl-induced goldfish death. Bowls are to Goldfish what guillotines are to French aristocrats.>
* Thought that I need to do fish keeping properly and got 140 l aquarium in
2007. First batch of gold fish from a local pet shop did not survive - I did not understand the need for cycled tank.
* Cycled the tank and tried to keep 2 fishes in 140 l, using prime conditioner. Got all proper water testing kits, a large Fluval filter,
substrate, plants. Fish lived for around 3 years, but slowly died out.
* 2010-2012 no fish
* 2012 - recommissioned the tank. Bought an Eheim large outside filter.
Cycled for 3 weeks. Introduced 3 gold fishes. Water OK, tested daily.
Fish died. Introduced a single fish. Ammonia 0, Nitrite 0, Nitrate low.
frequent water changes. Fish died. Decommissioned the large tank.
* 2013 - tried to give fish keeping another go - Betta this time. No luck!
Any help and advice are greatly appreciated.
Kind regards,
Irena.
<Might direct you first to Bob Fenner's "pocket money priced" book of Betta keeping, here:
http://www.amazon.com/Betta-Success-long-term-Successful-Aquariums/dp/1494867818/ref=la_B001K810CI_1_2/186-9319682-7061545?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1410370856&sr=1-2
Easy read.
Do also look at his briefer summary here:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/betta_splendens.htm
Then your humble correspondent has a few words to say about goldfish and stocking tropical fish tanks:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/goldfish101art.htm
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/ca/volume_5/volume_5_3/stocking.htm
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/fwlivestk.htm
Find out what your local water chemistry is. Hard or soft. Then choose hardy fish that enjoy those conditions. In hard water that could be Platies for example. In soft water many of the tetras (though I'd avoid Neons to be honest). Some fish will do well in both, Danios and Bronze Corydoras for example. Pick and mix hardy species, adding a few at a time, with at least a couple weeks between each batch. Hmm... more I could say, but this should help. No, don't give up; but yes, do read, reflect, ask questions. Cheers, Neale.>

Re: Healthy happy Betta dead within 24 hours - is it the end of my fishkeeping affair :-(( 09/11/14
Neal,
<Irena,>
Thank you so much!!!! I will do the reading again and try again.
<Wise.>
I am in Western Australia. Will check the hardness of water (ours is pretty soft I believe). Our pH is usually high - around 7.8. Could
that be the problem? I used filtered water before, it seems to lower pH - maybe should revert to that?
<Possibly. If it works for you. Do check water chemistry if you use filtered water or mix it with tap water. Basically, for a mixed community of fish you want around 10 degrees dKH, pH 7-7.5.>
Will keep persevering!
<Good luck!>
Thank you again,
Irena
<Cheers, Neale.>

Normal Coloring or a sign of sickness? (Bettas)   4/8/14
decide to come straight back with a few questions! I recently came into possession of two male Bettas. Thanatos, or just Natos is a lovely black dragonscale crowntail with gorgeous red fins. His dorsal fin however, does not look like his others, whereas his ventral, anal, and caudal fins are red with black tips and silver streaks on the rays his dorsal is entirely silver with a bit of black on the rays. While it looks like normal coloration, it was something I did not notice when I bought him. But the thing I am actually worried about is this fine "dust" that I worry may be velvet.
<Mmm; not likely this Dinoflagellate... simply on the basis that it would have killed the fish. See WWM re Velvet and FW fishes>
Under a flashlight he has this fine dust kinda light brown in color only behind his head along his spine to his dorsal fin. He is active, eats well and when shown a mirror, flashes aggressively much like my steel blue bicolor, Mako.
I have not treated for velvet yet because I recently added API First Layer Pure Laterite substrate so that I could add in some Amazon Compactas. Both tanks are clouded due to adding it and I hope that the laterite dust is the "dust" that I'm seeing on Natos. The box says that the cloud will clear but it has been around 18 hours since adding the substrate. If it is velvet, I have a 1.5 gallon tank on hand to treat him in.
Mako is another story. I believe him to be a giant crowntail as when placed next to Thanatos, he dwarfs my poor little tough guy. However, his coloring makes me worry. Mako was a Wal-Mart rescue submersed in icky brown water.
Though he is inquisitive and lively, there are so many diseases in Bettas that I worry for the slightest thing though I try not to jump the gun. When I bought Mako, I had him housed in a 1.5 hexagonal tank with several fake plants, a bubbler set to very low(so that I would not damage his fins) and a small filter. I performed 20-40% changes when his water clouded, rinsing excess food and debris from the gravel (until I can get a gravel vac) and then slowly acclimated him back to the water by bagging him (I know this can be stressful to him, but I'd prefer that evil over a shock related death) and floating him in the water for an hour, the slowly adding new water (about 10-15%) every thirty minutes until the water is mostly the tank water, then released him.
He was rather pale when I got him, so much so I couldn't tell if the poor boy was supposed to be steel, black, white, or copper! After getting him in his tank he began to brighten up and I was able to identify his as a steel blue. He is very iridescent, and even his red fins pale out to a metallic pink due to a silver wash color that makes him very flashy to watch.
However, recently when I bagged him to add the Laterite substrate without harming him, I saw that the very ends of his fins were clear. Should I be worried or is that a sign of fin regrowth?
<Not a worry; either genetics or new growth likely>
His fins were tattered (beyond crowntail appearance) so I was curious if the clear fins was a good sign. He also has two large golden metallic spots on his gill covers that I wonder if it is disease or his normal scales.
Both Bettas are currently set up in cycled tanks, Mako's being a 5.5 gal and Thanatos' being a 5 gal. They both have Amazon compactas to rest on.
Mako has a sunken ship and a small forest of silken plants to hide himself in while Thanatos has a rock outcropping with silk plants surrounding it to hide in though they never use them. They're too busy trying to meet me at the front or attack their reflection... Both tanks received a layer of the API First Layer mentioned above. Mako has a small heater holding his tank at a beautiful 80-82 degrees while Thanatos is in a warmer part of the house that stays about 80-85 degrees year round therefore I did not see a reason for a heater. Thanatos has an Aqueon Quietflow that came with his Bow Front aquarium. Mako has a Top Fin 5.5 gallon with the power filter that came with it, which I need to replace. It is far too powerful for Mako and buffets him about like a ragdoll. To keep water moving I reinstalled his bubbler, but I'd like to find a less powerful filter that won't harm Mako or his delicate fins. Do you have any suggestions?
<Just the usual reading>
I still have the air powered filter from my 1.5 gal should I try to reinstall it just as a means of filtration until I can find a less powerful filter? Are there any Betta specific filters?
<Not that I know of; but any low volume one/s will do>
Both tanks operate at a often stable 0 nitrite and ammonia level that only minorly raises before I deign to clean. I have hard water that hovers around a pH of 7.5-7.6. My house operates on a 40-year old-country well. So I worry less about the chlorine, but treat the water anyway to err on the side of caution. Never know what nasties end up in the water.
<If you drink it... I wouldn't be concerned>
I want to be sure I am doing this right. I want my pretty boys do have long happy lives of comfort.
Thanks for your time guys!
sincerely,
Brittney
<Keep reading! Bob Fenner>

Betta Inquiry; hlth.  6/22/13
Hello,
 <Ang>
 I recently received a male Crowntail Betta (it was purchased from a chain pet store on 6th of June, 2013) from a family member because they could not get the fish to eat.
<... unusual... Is this fish in a heated (tropical), filtered setting?>

 After dabbling with a variety of foods, I finally figured out that he would eat freeze-dried bloodworms.
<A poor choice
... Please search, read on WWM re this and suitable environments for Betta splendens>
He has been his happy Betta self, although today (while his behavior has remained the same) I noticed that he appeared to be hiccupping of sorts and I was wondering if that was cause for concern.
 <Is. Bob Fenner>
Thanks,
Angela Simmons
Re: Betta Inquiry  6/23/13

Hello Bob,
 <Angela>
 The fish is in a tropical environment suitable for Bettas that is properly heated and filtered.
<Ah good>
He refuses live food, although today I did manage to tempt him with frozen brine shrimp and frozen bloodworms.
<... I'd skip the sewer fly larvae... Again, just search WWM re rationale... And here re Betta nutrition:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/betfdgfaqs.htm
I have had (and still have) numerous Bettas yet this one appears to be a picky eater. While the ‘hiccupping’ has stopped, I am still wondering what caused it.
 <Could be... parasite/s, something stuck in the buccal cavity, an aspect of water quality; many other possibilities. B>
Thanks,
Angela Simmons

One white spot in Betta    2/15/13
Hi, I have had my Betta for 6 months. He has always been in a Fluval edge 12 gallon with 3 media filtration system, & heater with temp consistently at 78 degrees. He is by himself. I feed him high quality pellets once a day to prevent from over feeding & to maintain ammonia levels at minimum low.
In the beginning when my tank was still new & I just got him his color faded & developed fin rot. I immediately got fungal medicine and after 3-4 weeks of monitoring I was able to get rid if it. I even bought a Malaysian driftwood to lower the ph in the water. It was over 7.8 at the time.
For the past 5months I have been doing 30- 40% water change very 7-10 days, I add salt
<I wouldn't. Please search WWM re. Not necessary; may be detrimental>
 (but not the full amount each time always half less because of frequent change), & water conditioner. I change the sponge in media every 1mnth to 1.5mnth, & change his carbon/zeo crystals every 2-3wks. he has been growing, & his tail is almost back to his fullest. He has gotten so beautiful vivid red & he is getting some neon blue tint in his tail & body.
Very active & very interactive. He goes straight to top of tank waiting for his 7am feeding time.
But for the past couple of wks I noticed he had a white spot on the side of his body. I didn't think anything of it, but I wanted to monitor it. This mrng it appeared slightly larger. No bumps, no other spots, no discoloration, no velvet texture, & no change in behaviour.
<Not to worry re this one spot. Not likely parasitic; disease-related>
I have a water test kit, & all levels were exactly where they are suppose to be.
What could the white spot be from? am I not putting enough salt?
<Perhaps a physical injury, accumulation of body mucus at the spot. Again, I'd leave salts out.>
Sorry for the long description, but I wanted you to know everything first.
Best,
Roya
<Cheers, Bob Fenner>
re: One white spot in Betta    2/15/13

Hi thank you for your quick response!
You said to not add salt, do you mean to not add salt at every water change?
<Correct>
 I thought I should add salt, but since I'm doing regular changes I should add half of what I'm suppose to ( 2tsp per 2.5 gallons).
How much should I add at every 30-40% water change for a 12 gallon tank?
<.... search WWM re... >
You mentioned it could be mucus build up? How could he get that?
<Fishes produce it... see WWM re this also>
so this will go away on it's own?
So its not a fungus, parasite, or disease?
Roya
<Keep reading. B>

Sick Bettas, Roundworms?    12/5/12
Hi! I'm hoping you all can help me. I have 7 female Bettas in a 26 gallon bowfront. It's heavily planted and has a gravel substrate. It all started one day when I noticed that one of my Bettas had a paler spot between it's mouth and gill. It wasn't a slime patch, it looked like it had just lost it's color.
<"Does just happen" at times, but can be indicative of other troubles>

 I wasn't sure what it was, so I just kept an eye on it.
<Good>
A couple of days later, I saw a scale fall of where the pale spot was. The next day, something was growing out of it. The best word I can use is fronds, almost like an anemone, but much thinner. I went to my local fish store, and talked to the owner, and he said it sounded like Columnaris.
<Mmm, maybe Camallanus... roundworms. See WWM w/ the Nematode genus name in the search tool>
 He told me to use Maracyn, and that it would clear up. So I moved her to my hospital tank and dosed her. On the first day of treatment the fronds went away, but where they were was a sore. I thought she was getting better, but on the last day of treatment, the fronds came back. I did some reading on the internet, and saw that a lot of people had luck with Furan 2,
<This won't treat/rid worms either>
so i did a 100% water change, and a couple of days later started the Furan. It didn't seem to do anything at all. About this same time, I noticed that 2 of the other Bettas had Finrot.
<Likely from exposure to the other med.s... a slippery slope...>
 I went back to the fish store and was told this time to try Maracyn Plus. I moved the first Betta back into the main tank since i would have to treat them all. While I was moving her, the fronds came off, but they left almost a hole where they had been. I did the course of Maracyn Plus, and it seemed to help the Finrot. After the fronds fell off, it seemed to heal, without the paleness, and she has been doing a lot better. But now one of the other Bettas has the same thing, but it has 4-5 of them, one was big, the other ones were pretty small. I decided to move that one to the hospital tank, since the other problems had cleared up. And again, while trying to catch her, the fronds of the big patch came off, leaving a giant wound. I got really upset and went back to the fish store for the third time, talked to the owner yet again, and this time he said maybe it was a fungus. He sold me some API Liquid Fungus Cure,
<... of no use>
which also hasn't seemed to help at all. I'm pretty sure I'm going to have to euthanize the Betta, she won't eat and the wound doesn't seem to be healing. Do you have any idea what the problem could be? I trusted the fish store owner, but nothing he said seems to be right. About my tank, ammonia and nitrites were at 0, nitrates were about 30ppm. PH was a 7.6, and the temp stays about 75/79. It's been an established tank for about a year, and I've never had any problems before this. If you can give me any idea how to keep this from happening again I would be very grateful. Thanks!
<Do take a read here:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/nematodesfwf.htm
Does your situation look like these examples? I'd be treating w/ an Anthelminthic... Like Prazi/quantel... in foods if the fish are eating. Bob Fenner>

Re: Sick Bettas       12/5/12
Thank you for the quick response. I took a look at the link, but that's not quite what it looked like. I know this is going to sound stupid, but if you look at the attachment I sent, it looked like this, but it was all gray/white.
<Descriptive of mycelia... a true fungus... These are actually rare in aquariums. Most what folks call fungal are bacteria>
The fish that had them the worst passed away last night, but I would like to know if this was something I could keep from happening again.
Again, thanks for your help
<Good maintenance and nutrition are the best avenues to keep such infectious disease at bay. BobF>

New Betta Question    6/13/12
Hi! I'm a new Betta mom (as in three days new). My beautiful little (and I do mean little, he's the smallest Betta I've ever seen) Zen is swimming all over his 10 gal. tank, he especially enjoys surfing with his filter current and playing NASCAR around his heater. I have only one small problem with him that has me a little paranoid and have exhausted every search engine I can find to try and get an answer; his ventral fins seem to stay quite close to his body (except when he is turning or when he is flaring and even then they have me nervous because they seem to cross over each other). I don't know what to do! Am I worrying over nothing or is he seriously sick?
<Worrying will not change the future; assuredly. Perhaps these pelvics haven't "developed" as yet... or they may be somewhat different than general for Betta splendens. At any case, as you state, the fish is apparently healthy and happy...>
Is it clamped fins (which I'm not sure because it's only his ventral fins that he keeps close, all of the others flow out brilliantly, besides his dorsal which has a slight curl over like it's too long for him and seems quite smallish in width)?
<Don't be concerned... this is natural>
 Oh, I wish my camera was working so I could attach a picture! Thank you so much for your time and help, Erin!
<Welcome. Bob Fenner>

Siamese fighter. Hlth., fdg. rdg.    6/4/12
Hi, about two or three months ago I bought a red crown tail Siamese fighter which I noticed back then I noticed had some light spots on its head  they're not cottony and they're not pure white. They're a pinkish colour and I see now he still has them. He's got them about each eye and other two on each side of his head. Should I be worried?
<Mmm, no; likely "natural coloring">
 The temperature is about 27 degrees Celsius and the eater is fairly clean.
He eats normally , I give him the Tetra Betta food is that okay?
<Yes; though I'd augment this w/ meaty, small size foods... See WWM re:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/betfdgfaqs.htm
Bob Fenner>

Sick crown tail Betta... why not search, read ahead of writing us w/ no info.? 4/7/12
This morning I started noticing my male Betta was being lethargic. A few minutes ago I saw he was at the surface not moving much and another few minutes later I saw a white patch starting to form on his head and cover his eyes and now he's blind. Anything in particular that can cause this?
<Many>
A specific disease maybe? He was a tiny bit lethargic yesterday and the day before but I thought he was just resting. Can I save him?
<... system, water quality, foods/feeding...? Where's the useful data? Read here: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/bettadiseases.htm
and the linked files above. Bob Fenner>

Could you provide a diagnosis.    2/9/12
> Hi,
> Here is what my Betta looked like the day before he died. I really do  my best to take care of my fish. I had a Betta for 4.5 years
<Wow! Most Bettas live 2-3 years... yours was very long-lived>
 prior to this one. The status of my aquarium is this: 10 gallon, cycling, and now has 2 cory's in it. My Betta was in it, but it died two days ago.
> Is my tank infected?
<Not direly so; doubtful. The photos reveal some sort of decomposition, mostly in the latter, upper body area...>
can you see what was wrong with the Betta? is my tank
> infected with something? are my cory's safe?
<Likely so>
> Thanks again,
> Kaite
<Welcome. Bob Fenner>

 

Re: Could you provide a diagnosis.    2/9/12
Hi Bob,
<Katie>
Is there a possibility of diagnosis? Is there a name for what happened to my fish that you know of?
<Senescense as hinted. There is no better definitive possibility w/o sampling and microscopic examination; possible staining, culture...>
Also can you please give me some advice on what I should do? Anything? Nothing?
<I would do nothing... simply "treating" blindly, using a biocide will do nothing good. Read here: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/BetDisDiagF.htm
and the linked files above for much more. 
B>
Thanks again,
Katie
Re: Could you provide a diagnosis.    2/10/12

Hi again,
Do you think his problem was fungal? Bacterial?
<Again, and hopefully for the near-last time; there's no way to tell w/o...>
 I really don't want this to happen again. I read on your site that salt was not the answer, neither was the Melafix.
<Worthless>
You do recommend something (...2000) that is available in Europe. I spent a lot of time searching your site. Its really hard to gather info.
What do you think?
Katie
<The same as the two last email exchanges. See below/above. B>

Betta with a Hernia?  2/4/12
My roommate's female Betta has a protrusion from her stomach. It looks like a small kidney bean that is attached to her tummy. Earlier this week she was acting like she was having seizers so we tested her water and her nitrate and stress levels were high so we changed her water and added aquarium salt to reduce the hardness, and she seemed fine after that.
She has a normal appetite. Her diet is mostly Betta pellets with freeze dried blood worms given occasionally for a treat. She lives in a half gallon tank with a Betta hammock and a plastic plant. Her water gets changed once a week and while her tank does not have a heater we try to keep her water temperature in the mid seventies or higher. She has been blowing bubbles more often then normal as well.
<Mmm, I don't know what this might be; but definitely not a kidney... these are retroperitoneal as in ourselves. If it were me, mine, I'd leave this mass as is; not treat... likely it will drop off of its own accord. Bob Fenner>

 

Betta in harder water    11/23/11
Hello:
I was thinking of putting a Betta into a 20 gallon long that I put a tablespoon of marine salt in. The Betta that I had in there this morning with fungus on the tail died after a water change. Since the marine salt
went in there, the ph is a lot higher. I was wondering if I should drain the water first and fill it with soft tap water or it is ok to leave a healthy Betta in a tank with a little salt for a few days?? Thank you!!
<Hello Judy. It's unlikely your Betta died "because of a water change" so you might want to establish the true causes here. Surely the fungal infection reflects poor environmental conditions and/or nippy tankmates. Review, and act accordingly. Since you have an aquarium now, cycling shouldn't be a problem. Adding tiny pinches of flake food each day or two should keep the filter bacteria happy even if there isn't a Betta in the aquarium. Next up, remember Bettas are basically incompatible with other tropical fish. Among common community fish, the only obviously safe tankmates are Bristlenose catfish and Corydoras catfish. Danios, tetras, barbs, cichlids, etc. generally cause problems. Thirdly, there's no need to use salt in a Betta aquarium. It has, historically, been used in Betta bowls, where the salt slightly (but not completely) offsets the poor nitrate/nitrite levels that exist in bowls. But in a proper heated and filtered aquarium, there is absolutely no need for salt except in those situations where it is used for a short period to combat Whitespot or Velvet. Concentrations of 2 g/l will do no harm at all, but honestly, you'd
do best to flush out most of the salt through a couple of largish water changes across a couple days before you go buy the new Betta. Do please read:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/BettaGldfshKpgArt.htm
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/bettasysart.htm
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/SaltUseFWArtNeale.htm
Cheers, Neale.>

Help with my little Betta, Buddy   11/6/11
Hello experts of fish! I have just found your site and have been diligently searching it for answers to what is going on with my Betta (Buddy), but have only found bits and pieces in posts but nothing that sounds quite right for his situation. I am hoping you might be able to provide some guidance, please and thanks.
<Ok and welcome>
So, I've had my Betta for about a year and he initially started off in a 1/2 gallon bowl, but then I began reading about Bettas and felt it was cruel and set him up in a 3 gallon tank with a filter and a little heater around February. I have always fed him 4-5 little Hikari Betta bites per day with no problems and he always gobbled like a little pig.
<I'd definitely expand on this diet. Please read here:
http://wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/betfdgfaqs.htm>
I kept his water clean with a vacuum of about 1/3 his water per week and keep a plastic jug of water treated with water conditioner.
<Good>
He then turned into the happiest little guy and seemed to love life; at least, until a couple of weeks ago. I noticed that his fin seemed to be a bit smaller, was looking a little tatty and less vibrant, and had a slightly whitish edge.
After doing some research, I thought it could be fin rot so I transferred him to a smaller bowl so that I could do more frequent water changes and monitor him a bit better (in hindsight, perhaps a bad idea but I was thinking it was like a little "hospital" bowl). I stated giving him small doses of aquarium salt according to the package and checked all his bowl water parameters (except that my strips do not test for ammonia, which seems problematic). He didn't seem to be getting better and then he became progressively worse. At first, he seemed to be having a hard time breathing and his fins were gaping at an alarming rate. He also was quickly swimming to the surface to the point that I thought he may propel out, at which point I covered his bowl a bit to prevent that (but obviously left room for air to circulate).
<Something is wrong here... water quality wise... or perhaps your Betta has "eaten a bug" of some sort that has found its way into the system>
At this point, he has a very hard time swimming to the top and once he does swim to the top for air or food, he immediately sinks back down, and pretty rapidly. His breathing is labored and his gills seem to slowly open and close. His bowl water is between 78 and 80 degrees and I am trying to do water changes every other day or so with a turkey baster while trying not to disrupt him. I have a little silk plant and a leaf hammock near the surface, where he often sits so that he can reach the top of the water to breathe more easily. I noticed that there did not seem to be "poo" in the water and I was afraid of swim bladder,
<... there really is no such thing>
so I fed him some pea bits for a few days, which he readily ate, but still no poo. He was trying to eat and would swim to the top when he saw me for more than several days, but all of these actions have become more difficult in the last couple of days. For the past 2 days he was really trying to swim up and eat, but he did not appear to be able to stay at the surface for long and would fall back down, therefore missing most of the food. I called two fish stores I frequent to ask for advice, as I did not want to dose him with anything without knowing what may be wrong with him in order to avoid stress.
<Ahh, very good>
They wanted me to bring him in but I really was afraid of stressing him out so I have been checking the internet ad nauseam to see if I can find an explanation of all of his symptoms, which I have not. Additionally, under his head and now more around his head as well has been turning whitish/silverish, which seems concerning. He was always a vibrant blue/purple and now he is a very dull color. Honestly, and I know this is terrible, but I go to bed every night thinking he will pass, but things have been getting progressively worse for the past 2 weeks and it seems like he is fighting, which makes me feel even more terrible because I have not been able to improve his life. I am afraid that he is really suffering and I really want to put a stop to it if it is necessary, although that makes me cringe. I know that I have to do what is best for him. Any advice on next steps would be appreciated. Thanks so much!
Amber
<In such circumstances (not knowing what the actual root cause/s might be), my reaction is to default to wholesale change of the environment... Keep the filter media wet, but either dump all else, or bleach, rinse, treat for chlorine... and start again. Some might advise you to add a modicum of Epsom Salt as well. Please do relate your further observations, experiences here. Bob Fenner>

Really calm Betta or he is sick?    10/1/11
Hello:
I managed to give away all my female Platies due to not wanting them in with the males and keeping the large tank on the counter. At the store where I dropped them off, I found an actual rare black crowntail Betta and bought it. I never see these around and I was thinking of getting one for a long time. I have an old five gallon and he is now in warm soft water with a hiding place. The Betta moves really slow and is now hiding in a plant, really still, like he is meditating :) Could the Betta be sick?? Freaked out by a five gallon after being in a small cup?? or just really laid back?? Crowntails tend to be feisty, but this guy is the most Zen Betta I've met. Thank you!!!
Judy
<Hello Judy. Bettas aren't very active anyway, and a day or two after purchase, they may well be spooked. So give it time. Subdued lighting and gentle filtration (as opposed to bright light and turbulent water) will both help him feel at home. So long as he's feeding and breathing normally, I wouldn't worry too much just yet. After a couple days, bring a mirror close to the tank and see if he reacts. He should get interested. Don't tease him with the mirror, but as a way of checking a male Betta is healthy, it's as good a way as any. Cheers, Neale.>

My poor Betta... reading  5/26/2010
Hello there. I am really hoping you can assist me in figuring out what is wrong with Bear (my Betta). He is almost a year old and has been very very lethargic lately. His color has not changed too much considering the fact that he is a white Betta already. About a week ago he stopped eating his Beta Color Bright flakes
<Insufficient nutritionally>
so I went and got him so fresher freeze dried blood worms. He still won't touch them. I do a 1/4 water change every week and have Stress Coat to take out the chlorine and other bad chemicals that are in the water. He now just sits on top of his cave or lays near the surface of the water. I was wondering if he's sick or possibly just an old man on his way out.
Thank you very much,
Sophie
<... is this system filtered, heated? Read here:
http://wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/bettasysart.htm
and here: http://wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/bettadiseases.htm
and the linked files above... do you now know what the issue/s are here?
Bob Fenner>

Mac...my blue Betta fish... hlth.   9/27/09
Hello,
<Hi,>
I hope I'm able to explain this correctly and not confuse you as far as what's wrong with my Betta but I just happen to notice he's got a bump on the lower part of his mouth.
<Most likely physical damage. Check the tank is big enough (at least 5 gallons/19 litres) and that the water current isn't so strong the fish is buffeted about. Do check the water quality is good, otherwise secondary infections are likely. Also check the water is warm enough for the same reasons: not less than 25 C/77 F.>
I've had other betas before with problems but I've never seen this one before. It sort of looks like a pimple and if you see him from a side angle it's sticking out. I feed him the pellets (little round ones) because he seems to love those instead of the flakes because he has a hard time getting the flakes and I can tell he get's frustrated because he can't grab them.
<Hmm... do try offering more of a variety, ideally some green foods (cooked peas, squished) and live/wet-frozen daphnia and/or brine shrimp.
Constipation is very common when people feed Bettas just flake, pellets or freeze-dried foods.>
As far as the little bump to be more specific it looks like a little pellet got stuck on his lower jaw stretching the skin out. Do you have any idea what it could be?
<Without a photo, it's difficult to say. Physical damage is the most common explanation for small, odd deformities that appear from nowhere. But vitamin deficiencies can cause fish equivalents of goiter, and exposure to chronically bad water quality or extreme water chemistry can cause other developmental problems. Bettas are "jumpers" and in small tanks can throw themselves at the hood or tank walls, causing damage. Overly strong filters can damage their fins and loosen scales. So there's a bunch of things to review. Food is unlikely to cause damage from the inside of the mouth, though. I mention the environment repeatedly here because too many people keep Bettas in unheated, unfiltered tanks that are too small for them.
Regardless of what the salespeople sometimes suggest, these are tropical fish that need a tank 5 gallons or larger with a filter (preferably air-powered) and heater (central heating or an angle-poise lamp won't do).
Almost all the myriad Sick Betta queries we get are from people who don't consider these particular issues.>
I would appreciate your help with this and if you could give me some advice on to how to treat it.
Thanks,
Miguel
<Cheers, Neale.>

Betta Illness: Unclear Origins  8/6/07 Dear Crew, <Hi Alison, Jorie here today.> I've sent in once before about my Bettas and you were very, very helpful. <Glad to hear this - we certainly try our best here!> I'm hoping you can help me with my most recent problem, as I've searched the archives and I couldn't find anything to the specific incident I had. <I will try!> Here goes: I have a two year old albino female Betta (with little pink eyes), and she's always been my pride and joy. <Ahhh, I'm jealous - these are beautiful fish! Quite expensive 'round these parts, too, which is why I don't have my own:-)> I had her in a smaller bowl for the past month in order to condition her for her first breeding so she had ready access to food. When I keep my Bettas in the conditioning bowls, I usually do a 75% water change every one or two days and remove any feces or left over food with a dropper. <It certainly sounds like you know what you are doing, but I'm a bit concerned about changing so much water at once. Hopefully the new water is "matched" as closely to the old water as possible (in terms of pH, temperature, etc.)? Otherwise, you run the risk of shocking the little girl's system. When I tried to keep a female Betta in a 1 gallon filtered/heated tank, that was the problem I ran into; in trying to keep the waste product under control...there's not much water to play with in such a situation. Also, I have found that the fancier stains of Bettas (i.e., more genetically manipulated) can result in the fish being even more sensitive to adverse conditions...something to keep in mind.> The problem is, I went out of town for a day, and when I got back, her bowl was unusually dirty (not a big deal, someone in the house had given her a treat (confirmed) and there was extra waste output). <It happens. Whenever I go out of town, I make little Ziploc baggies of food for each of my tanks, and emphasize that this is the only thing I want the fish to be fed in my absence.> I went to change her water, and she jumped into the dirty water bucket... <Wow - an active girl!> The water contained pieces of cucumber and tetracycline from the other fish's water. I netted her out and she jumped approximately 7 inches to the floor, where I picked her up and put her in her clean bowl. Immediately, I noticed her swimming erratically. <She may have injured herself, but hopefully it's just a result of shock, which will remedy itself given proper care.> The characteristic swim bladder problem of twirling came to mind. <It is possible the swim bladder was injured in the fall...> However, I also noticed she was able to maintain a chosen depth in the water, but was unable to stay upright. Then I read the Wet Web Media article on swim bladders and the part about their "ears", fluid-filled chambers that let them know they are upright. That seemed more feasible, as she had it happen literally within 10 seconds. <I'm not sure I exactly understand what you mean here.> I am unclear why this happened or what I can do to remedy it. I know she jumped out because I was home late and not careful with her when doing my animal husbandry chores. <I think this was just a fluke, honestly, and not something you should blame yourself for...> What I am unsure of is what it resulted from (shock, bacteria, etc.), and what on earth I can realistically do. She's still eating voraciously, but having a heck of a hard time doing it. She spins like a torpedo trying to get a bloodworm and although she doesn't look miserable, I can't imagine spinning forever to be an ideal sort of life. :( <Well, first things first. It sounds like she lives alone, so this is good - no one to pick on her, eat her food, otherwise stress her out. A Betta's swim bladder is quite sensitive, so I'm betting she did in fact injure hers in the fall/jump. It's good that she's able to swim up and down, so that she can easily make it to the top to take in air. If that weren't the case, I would recommend lowering the water level in the tank, and giving her some decorations to be able to "perch" on. The latter may actually be of use in your girl's situation; if she's constantly spinning, give her a couple of spots where she can "rest" in the tank, and just sit/lie. The good news is swim bladder injuries/disorders are not usually painful and are rarely fatal to the fish, and a fish so affected can live out the remainder of her live in comfort. The bad news is there really isn't a way to "treat" the injury, per se. The best you can do is keep the water clean, keep her comfortable, make sure she continues to eat, and allow her to rest (not that different that treating an ill child, is it?!)> The fish whose water had been treated was a goldfish with a great deal of finnage which had been damaged while struggling with improper tank decorations. He has no parasites or diseases I am aware of, nor does the female Betta in question. <That's good - no pathogens, diseases transmitted to your girl, then.> Most treatments I find usually only specify what to do for constipation or bacterial infection of the swim bladder. <Yes.> I am most hopeful for a suggestion. <Unfortunately, this is a case where only time where tell. Keep her clean, warm and comfortable and hope that the injury repairs itself internally. If not, make the necessary accommodations in her tank (see suggestion re: places to sit/perch above) and she'll likely live out her life comfortably. Do be careful about choosing whether to breed this fish; if her swim bladder is truly injured, the stress of breeding may well do her in. Unfortunately, she may be better suited as a true "pet", in a larger heated/filtered tank (3-5 gallons is ideal).> Thank you for your time. <You're welcome; sorry I don't have a "magic cure". Hopefully time and rest will be of use here. Best wishes, Jorie> Alison

Sick Betta... toxic system  11/12/06 Ok here I go. I had 3 tuxedo guppies, 5 neon tetras and a male Betta. The beta had white patches on him, was lethargic, had clamped fins and was losing color so I treated the tank with fungus cure. After that he patches were gone but even after some time the beta still was just coming up for air and food so I did a 70% water change. I even cleaned the gravel and plants (by boiling not with soap). After that the beta was much better. His fins were opening slightly, he was swimming and his color was coming back. After a few days one of the guppies died with a bent spine. <All of a sudden? All of them?> I then recheck all the water (ph, ammonia, nitrates...) and everything seemed to be in a normal range. I also noticed that one of the other guppies had red strings coming out of him and a bloody tail fin. I was so sad that even though I noticed this, it didn't quite register. The next day the other guppy died of what looked like internal bleeding since his abdomen looked to be filled with blood. I looked around and found out that this was due to worms so I treated the tank with an internal parasite killer. <Active ingredient/s?> After a bit I noticed that one of the tetra's was missing a tail. I tried to quarantine him (like I had all the other sick fish) but he got so lethargic, wasn't eating and was only trying to jump out of the water, <... bad signs> I figured it was best for him to stay with his school. He died soon after. After I finished the full treatment for the parasite, the guppy still has worms but the medication said not to use more then 3 treatments which I had already used. This is when I noticed the beta. He is staying near the top of the water, lying sideways most of the time. He is not eating, and I have tried freeze dried bloodworms which he used to love, flakes, and pellets. He also has scratches on his body which is paper thin almost everywhere except his stomach which is much rounder than usual. He also has a strange yellow sac hanging on to him near his fin. One of his eyes is clouded over and the other has one white speck on it that moves around pretty fast. If I were to treat each symptom separately I would have to use: antibacterial, fungicide, anti-parasite which would probably be overmedicating and I still wouldn't cover everything. I was hopping that the symptoms might match up with something that I could cure, and I have no camera so I can't send a picture. Basically, what should I do? <Well... something is definitely out of whack here... some type of poisoning... Do you have a geode? Sea shell from the seashore? There is a source of toxicity that you need to find, address... and soon. Bob Fenner>

Betta diagnosis/prognosis   3/4/06 My little Roswell has experienced quite a series of unfortunate events lately. Although I have been successfully keeping another Betta fish, I fear I have made things worse for the new guy (he's about 6-12 months old). If at all possible, I would appreciate your advice as to what's fundamentally ailing him and if he might recover. (I apologize in advance for what will invariable be a long email...). <No worries, take your time> Roswell lives in a nice 3 gallon bowl with a soft plastic plant, a moss ball and one other small live plant. He has a junior heater that doesn't keep the water temperature steady per se, but keeps him at a more comfortable temperature between 75-80 depending on the time of day. I change 30-50% of his water every week with aged, treated water of the same temperature and I clean out his entire bowl every month. <Would be better to have a filter...> We don't have a PH or chloramine problem in the city's water and I never let any of his uneaten frozen blood worms stay in his bowl. And I definitely don't overfeed...once a day, 2 mouthfuls of blood worms that he would grab off my finger. <Needs more than this one food item...> 4 months ago, he lost the small purple splotches on his body and tail, which left him pink. After staring at him like a simpleton for weeks and weeks I could never see anything wrong with him other than his fins looked a bit unhealthy. So we treated him with Jungle Fungus cure. <... toxic> It never really worked, even after an extended treatment, so we stopped that and just observed him. His health seemed to deteriorate about 2 months ago. We thought that perhaps he had a parasite because his gills were getting a bit red and he seemed irritated, though he didn't show any classic signs of parasites. I put in 5 drops of Costapur and then another 2 drops 48 hours later and I saw what was, I know in retrospect, probably a dead anchor worm floating on the surface (at the time I thought it might have been just an old piece of food because I was amazed that something of that size could have gone unnoticed...perhaps it was in his gills). At this time, his breathing had become more laboured and his gill plates (cheeks?) became more reddened, so worrying that the medication was too strong, I quickly gave him a fresh bowl. This didn't really help his breathing. In fact, he started to "yawn" or "cough" a lot and he was having problems keeping the air he inhaled from the surface. He would gulp great bubbles and they would immediately escape through his gills or mouth. His vision also deteriorated and he was incapable of seeing my finger and jumping up for food. Because he was having problems breathing, I got an aerating stone (...which led to the escapade of swallowing bubbles and having to pass gas...). I tried tetracycline for his inflamed gills but that didn't really help. While changing his water (to make matters worse) the bottom of his hospital bowl fell out. <!?> I had the bowl about a foot over a plastic basin that I syphon water into and he fell with the water and the bottom into the basin. Nothing fell on top of him, and because he seemed to be just swimming about, I crossed my fingers that he would be okay. Nothing changed (or got better) until, about 3 weeks ago, I noticed a red mark near his anus and the very next day, there was a huge anchor worm attached to him. <Yowch!> I bought Jungle Parasite Clear which quickly killed the worm. The box recommended that I treat once a week for 3 weeks, but when it was time for the 3rd treatment, he just didn't look healthy enough to treat. His gill plates were red, he was gasping a lot and had developed an equilibrium problem. His scales looked like they were protruding a tiny bit, though he wasn't bloated at all. I thought it might be the beginnings of dropsy because of all the trauma so I did a couple Epsom baths and got a wide spectrum antibiotic called Kanaplex that said it could help treat dropsy (and gill disease), which I put in yesterday. <A good move this last> Right now he's still lying on his side and panting. I read a drop of hydrogen peroxide can help with the gills and to oxygenate the water, but it doesn't seem to help in a significant way. <Is only temporary> Perhaps instead of dropsy (his scales look better) he has a swim bladder disorder. Could the fall have brought that on, even if he didn't start displaying symptoms of SBD until a week and a half afterwards? <More likely the cumulative stress of treatments, the parasite...> Can a parasite infection cause SBD? <Yes, to a degree> I think his vision is improving and his appetite has always been okay, even if it's difficult for him to scoop up the worms, he manages to eat a few almost every day. He's in a small bowl right now for comfort sake and I'll certainly continue using Kanaplex in case there is an internal bacteria infection, but I'm not feeling very hopeful. I'm shocked that he's still alive... I hope this isn't his new normal. I would assume it was just SBD if he didn't still have red cheeks and was panting a lot. Your best guess about what caused what would be great. I can't imagine there's much more I can do, but if you have any suggestions I would be happy to try them. And...I hesitate to ask... at what point would euthanasia be recommended? Fish and fish keepers around the world thank-you for your fantastic site! Merci! <Mmm, welcome. I do encourage you to fit this fish's bowl/system with a small filter of some sort (inside power, air-driven sponge...) to facilitate biofiltration... Not to change out the water entirely... And to read: http://wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/bettasysart.htm and the linked files at top. Bob Fenner>

Betta's keep dying, frustrated!!! 7/27/05 Hi Bob and crew, <John> My partner was recently in our local pet store and bought one of those Betta bowls you guys don��t recommend (discovered later).  The bowl was not filtered or heated and Frankie the Fish grew white stuff (like a fungus) all over him and died shortly after. <Try living in the refrigerator...> She then got a filter for her bowl, aquarium salt and bought another fish, which was named Frankie again, and the same thing happened, which really upset our four-year-old son, as it was his pet. <Was this system heated?> I started searching on the net after the second fish died, and came across many sites, but your one seemed the most helpful, so stayed up and read it all night.  I then went out and purchased a bigger tank 20 Litres, don��t know what that is in gallons. <A liter/re is a little more than a quart, four quarts to a gallon> I also bought a heater and a new filter to clean the tank.   <Yay! Now you're getting close...> We set the new tank up, added aquarium salt and made sure the temperature stayed on 26 degrees Celsius, which is 80 degrees F.  After a week, we went out and purchased our 3rd Frankie, as well as a Ph kit for testing the water.  We tested the water first, and all seemed fine.  We then added Frankie, and after swimming around for a little while, he then would just stay at the bottom of the tank, only coming up for air.  He would lie on his side sometimes below the heater, or on the opposite corner to the heater.  Frankie refused to eat anything, and would sometimes swim around but mostly he would just lie on the bottom of the tank, only coming up for air.  Sadly to report, 3 days later, our third Frankie is dead, which is sad for the fish, and also for our son.  It is rather frustrating now, after reading up on everything for weeks and then doing everything right (as far as we understood), for the same thing to happen.   The third one did not grow any white stuff on it, so at least the temperature seemed to solve that.  Are there any suggestions you could give us at all? <Mmm, was this tank cycled? The principal cause of captive aquatic life loss is actually accumulation of their metabolic waste/s, or bottle-necking of chemical reactions therewith. Please read here: http://wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/fwestcycling.htm> We also added some Bettafix to the water, when it was lying on the bottom all the time.   <Not necessary> Any suggestion would be most welcome, as my partner does not want to get another one, but our son loved his little Frankie and would always come to the tank to see how Frankie was. Thanks for any help you can provide, John <Please leave the water as is... perhaps add a bit of "old" water from the store to it ahead of Frankie IV... You're close to understanding, providing the basics. Bob Fenner>

Re: Betta's keep dying, frustrated!!! 7/29/05 Hi Bob, <John> I had already emptied the tank, but had not read up on the cycled part of your website.  I have read all of that now and bought all of the kits to test the water.  The guy at the pet store said I did not need the nitrite kit, <Wrong> but I bought it anyway.  I filled the tank again tonight, and added aquarium salt, added some Methylene blue as this has been recommended on different sites.  Got a new filter again, as Frankie III did not seem to like the old one, when I turned it off, he swam more.  I will try to get some of the stores water for the tank as well.  The tank is sitting on 26 degrees Celsius.  Hopefully everything goes well this time.  Thank you for your advise again and prompt reply, it is greatly appreciated.  Hopefully everything will go well this time. Thanks Bob, again. John <I wish you and Frankie well. Bob Fenner>

Re: Betta's keep dying, frustrated!!! 8/11/05 Hi again Bob, thanks for the advise so far, it is greatly appreciated. <Welcome> I bought Frankie the IV and the V at a different Pet store.  So far both are living well, which is a great turn around from what happened before.  So thank you very much for your advise. <Persistence pays! Congrats.> One lives in a 20 litre tank with 4 Cory's, 1 bronze, 2 panda's and an albino.  There is also 4 algae eaters in this tank.   <Do keep your eyes on these last... happens that Betta's are often "rode on" by CAEs> In the other tank at home, a 50 litre, it has with Frankie, two bronze Cory catfish, and two algae eaters, but my problem is, when I test with the ammonia test kit, it goes into the higher readings.  I got rid of all of the live weed that we had planted in the tank as the local person at the petstore suggested this might be the problem.  This morning I did a full water change to bring the ammonia level down, and it has for the moment.   I'm feeding the fish, live black worm, Betta pellet's, and also frozen blackworms and also brine shrimp, of course different food for different days. I bought a product to bring ammonia down, but it didn't seem to work. <Look for BioSpira... Ammonia toxicity is the number one killer of captive aquatic life... Please read here: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/fwammfaqs.htm and the linked files above>   Sorry to disturb you again, but am I doing anything wrong?  I can't understand why the ammonia got so high!  When I did the complete water change today, I noticed a few live worms under the gravel.  Does this have anything to do with it? <Do peruse the linked files... you want to discover why this system is not cycled, cycling and solve it pronto... in the meanwhile, keep testing, feeding sparingly, doing small water changes...> Thanks for all of your help so far..... Frankie is going really well, and I just love this fish, seems to have a mind, so much better then goldfish. Thanks mate, John <Bob Fenner>

Re: Betta's stopped dying, not frustrated!!! 8/13/05 Hi Bob, <John> Ammonia levels are down to zero, thanks for the advice.  I went to the local aquarium shop and got a bag of their dirty filter water and added it to the tank.  Despite the water being dirty for a day or so, ammonia is down to zero now. So now everything looks like it is going well.  I did add a bag of their water originally as suggest in your link, before buying any fish.  So all is going well now and the fish seem healthy and happy. Thanks for all the help. John <Ah, congratulations on your success. Bob Fenner>

Betta's frayed fins... from? 7/12/05 Hi again, <Hello> I changed my Betta's [Haru] water today, and after I put him back in, I noticed that his dorsal looked sort of frayed.  Does fin rot usually start there? <At the tips of fins usually, yes... but, what is the cause?> Or could it just look like that because, his tail fin and dorsal have always been pretty transparent [he's a white Betta] Or, could I have accidentally torn it during transfer with the net? <Too likely the latter (I would use my hand, not a net), or just the change, new water> I'm not sure. I have always put aquarium salt and AquaSafe in his week-old water, and change it religiously every Monday.  Or, maybe I'm just freaking out for no reason... <Best to be patient here> Anyway, a little help would be nice, even if it's just to say "you're paranoid." Concerned, Crystal Howlett <I would not panic... often fish treatments/cures... are worse than actual diseases. Bob Fenner>

Question about Betta fins Hello, <Hi there> I have a question about my Betta's fins. They look shredded. When I brought him home with me in a different tank, they healed, but when I brought him back and into his bigger tank, his fins get shredded again. His behavior is very normal and he is very active. I change the water frequently and add aquarium salt to his water as well. I've changed the decorations from a coral decoration to two plastic plants and his fins are still shredded. He does like to fight with I'm guessing his reflection. Do you know what it could be? Thanks. LST <I don't know... you've covered about all the usual suspects... the decor (coral) affecting water quality, adding the salt... I take it that the fish is in a tropical (heated), filtered setting? Please see here: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/bettasysart.htm  It may be that your water quality is "that bad" either out of the tap... or is it just not cycled? Perhaps you have a Betta with genetic make-up that tends toward shredded fins... If it were me, my situation and I were curious, I'd try putting another individual in its setting... and see if the same thing happens to it... and then investigate your water quality more thoroughly... perhaps through analysis by a lab, college... There is "something" amiss here... like a geode, new copper plumbing... that is mal-affecting your fighter. Bob Fenner> 

Re: Question about Betta fins I had a Betta in there before in the exact same settings and he didn't have the fin trouble. Actually, for the first Betta I didn't have the salt.  LST <Thank you for this... well, am back to my "guess" that this is some inherent trait (the tatty fins gene?) of this particular Betta. Bob Fenner> 

Sickly Betta with a white spot Hello. <Hi...this is Jorie> I just discovered your website today and wish I had known about it a lot earlier. <'Tis a great website...I'm very grateful to have found it a few years back myself!>   I have one male Betta in a (probably) ½ gallon "Betta keeper."  It doesn't have a filtration system or anything like that.  Luigi was really healthy and active till recently, but all of a sudden he's just lying at the bottom of the tank.  He's breathing pretty heavily and has a decent-size white spot behind his gill (I don't think it's fuzzy or anything - almost looks more like a gouge, but he's by himself).  I'm feeling like this is probably all my fault because I haven't been watching him that closely.  I've had him for about 3 months.  He was a really good eater (Wardley Circle of Care), but now he's not even interested.  He does come up to the top to breathe every once in a while. <How often do you do water changes on this little tank? This is very important, especially since there isn't a filtration system.  With a tank that size, I'd do maybe 2 75% changes per week.  Also, be very careful not to overfeed your Betta...they only need about 4-5 pellets per feeding (whatever they can consume in about 2-3 minutes).  If there is excess food lying around the tank, that will just contribute to poor water quality. When you are doing water changes, be sure to match the temperature and pH as closely as possible of the old to new water. Additionally, I assume you are using tap water - be sure to use a dechlorinator to remove chlorine from the water...there are many brands available at most pet stores.  Follow the directions on the bottle for  dosage. Also, might I suggest you "upgrade" his food to the Hikari brand pellets...Wardley is pretty much on the low-end of the scale.  A small container of Hikari pellets won't cost you too much more, and it will be greatly appreciated by your friend.  I think that with proper maintenance (i.e., more frequent water changes) your Betta will be just fine...sounds like a completely fixable situation!> I've learned a lot from reading over your site today, but I'm wondering if there's any chance to save Luigi now. <Water changes, water changes, water changes.  Is he still swimming and eating? If so, it's definitely not a lost cause.>   I keep him at work with me - the pet store said he would be really low-maintenance. <Sadly, my friend, you've learned the hard way that some fish stores can be less than reliable.  Not that the Betta is "high maintenance", per se, but it does have specific requirements.  The one additional thing I'd suggest is to get a small floating thermometer to keep an eye on the tank's temperature...ideally, it should be at between 80 and 82 degrees for the Betta, but more importantly, be sure to keep the temp. as constant as possible.  You won't find a heater for a tank that small that won't fry the fish, so I certainly wouldn't suggest that, but I would suggest avoiding putting the tank in direct sunlight, etc.> I can't afford an expensive set-up, but is there anything I can do to help him?  I haven't been working much this morning because I'm feeling so bad for him. <Since Xmas is just around the corner, perhaps you could put a 3 gal. Eclipse tank on your list for your friend.  I've got two Bettas each in their own 3 gal tanks, and it's a Betta heaven, I tell you! The reason I suggest the Eclipse is that it comes with a 3 stage filtration unit.  I don't remember the exact cost, but I do not believe I spent more than $35 for the entire set up (and maybe even less than that).  You would then be able to fit a 5 watt heater in the tank to ensure constant temperature, and you'd be able to do less water changes (the more water in a tank, the more stable the environment).  As for your Betta's present situation, just keep doing water changes religiously, as I'm guessing poor water condition is the culprit here. Hope I helped you and your fishy friend...good luck, and let me know if you have more questions! Jorie> Meghan

Is my Betta sick or not sick? Hi, my husband and I have been pulling our hair out over our little Betta, Zen. He has something and we cannot figure it out to save ours or his life. It started about 6-7 weeks ago when the edges of his caudal fin began to fade. Nothing other than the fading. It began to consume more of the caudal fin and the edges of the dorsal and anal fin begin to fade, as well. His behavior remained normal. Very active and alert with a very healthy appetite. We went over a week on his scheduled water change which we have never done and the surface of the water was a little scummy. He is in a ten gallon tank with 2 O'Cats and a Tetra Whisper filter 10i. There is a 6-8 inch ceramic air stone. The temperatures outside started dropping around late November and we could not maintain a consistent temp anymore so we added a heater, it's a 110 watt Guardian. <Good... much of the observed trouble could be directly related to cool and fluctuating temperature> There were some temp fluctuations while trying to adjust the heater. For about a week and a half the temps fluctuated around 5 degrees between morning and night. We were worried sick but kept trying until we got it set. The temp has been stable at 77.5 - 78.5 degrees for over a month now. So, we went over a week on the water change and noticed the scum starting to develop on top and had fluctuating temps. We did a water change immediately. It was right in this time period of a few days that we noticed the fading. We thought it might be fin and tail rot so we started him on some Kanamycin. That was from Dec 28-Jan 01.We removed the carbon from the filter and gave a 5 day treatment. No change. In fact, it was fading just a bit more. I called someone with much, much more knowledge than I and she said I should do one more treatment but a 25% water change should be done every other day. So we did another 5 day treatment with no filter and water changes from Jan 03 - Jan 07. Again, no change. Now his fins were not just faded but there were some small pieces missing from his caudal fin and his dorsal and anal fins had started to look "matted" on a small part of the edge. In frustration, we went to the local fish specialty store and talked to them. They suggested it might be his water. We were using distilled and tap at an 80% / 20% ratio. They said that with distilled water the fins can sometimes fade. So we did a 50% water change on Jan 09 and added Ozarka natural spring water. All the way up to this point our water quality was very good. <Is your tap/source water "that" bad? I would mix about half of this with one or the other of these bought waters> Tested by ourselves and the fish store employees. So we changed the water and left everything alone for about a week. After that week his fins were still faded and matted looking on some edges. By this point the small portions of fin he had lost were back. However, with the fading and the matted look we thought we should try one more Kanamycin treatment. We did this treatment from Jan 14 - Jan 18 with no carbon and we did not do 25% changes every other day. Jan 18 we were out for the evening and came in about 1am. Zen was not looking well at all. I dropped a couple of pellets in the water to see if he would eat and he looked right at them and swam right on by. Not like him at all. My husband and I watched him for a very short time and we saw him go to the bottom of the tank and fold himself in half and try to burrow into the sand with his head. I freaked out. I knew he was in serious trouble and I was sure he would die. My husband and I flew into action and did a 50% water change as fast as we could. I suspected the ammonia had reached toxic levels so we tested the old tank water and sure enough it tested at .015 ppm. <Yes... and I hope you understand the "why" here... the antibiotic killed off your nitrifying bacteria... and will do very little good for your Betta period> The pH was 7.0 and the temp was 77 degrees. As soon as fresh water went in the tank he began to look and act better. Within an hour he was eating and active and excited to see us looking in at him as usual. We left things alone for awhile and watched him but with no improvement in the coloring or the matted look we decided to try something new. On Jan 22-Jan 26 we treated him with Maracyn and Maracide. Unfortunately, we did not remove the carbon b/c we thought if it was 6 days or older it could stay in and with the ammonia scare we wanted to leave it, if at all possible. The only problem was we did not realize until after the treatment that the carbon was only 3 days old at the start of treatment. On Jan 26 the Toxic Ammonia was .006ppm / pH was 7.0 / Nitrite was 0.1 and temp was 77.7 degrees. On Jan 28 we did a 50% water change and added salt and Stress Coat. We, also, removed all decorations except two artificial plants and a very small "ancient ruins" figurine. Then on Jan 29 we removed the carbon and started treating with Maracyn 2 and one dose of Copper Safe. Tonight we will be giving him his fourth day treatment with the Maracyn 2 and we still have not seen any improvement. With the exception of the ammonia poisoning he has shown no other symptoms than what I have already stated. He has remained active and alert. He has been eating very well and we have not seen any sores, cottony white stuff, white spots, diseased looking gills or lifted scales. Nothing we can find in any of the disease books or online seem to apply to him. The Toxic Ammonia tonight (Feb01) was .0015ppm / pH = 7.0 / Temp = 78.4 degrees. I hope I have given you enough info. Do you have any suggestions for how to treat him or what might be wrong?. <I do... first, I fully suspect there was, is nothing "wrong" disease-wise with your fish... the chilling incident will account for your well-described behavior, fading changes... along with the mineral-deficient tank water... The medications, though well-intended, have been responsible for much anguish for you, and toxic to your fishes... Please do NOT add any more. I would raise the temperature of your water here to the low 80's F... and actually keep it there... much better for your Betta and catfish... and going forward, I would store and use a gallon or two of tapwater to use in your weekly water changes. Have you read over our archives on Betta splendens?  http://www.wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/betta_splendens.htm and the linked files (in blue, above).> I sincerely appreciate your time spent on this. Thank you and I hope you have a wonderful day.  Best Regards, Patricia and Daniel <Thank you for your intelligent, complete input here... and your obvious caring behavior toward/with the creatures in your care. Perhaps adding a bit (sprig) of live "grass" would aid you also in assuring good water quality... Bob Fenner>

Resting Betta 11/06/03  Hello Crew! You guys rock in so many ways!  <Hi, Pufferpunk here>  I have a 12-gallon tank with two mollies, two platys, and one male Crowntail Betta, that I keep at 80 degrees. The Betta looks perfectly healthy and eats well (I feed him Hikari Betta bio-gold plus freeze-dried bloodworms, but he also eats the flakes I feed to the other fish) but he's started taking "breaks" to rest on the plants in my tank. He will stop for a minute and drape himself over a leaf and just rest for a few minutes. Is there anything I should be watching for? Is this a sign of some subtle ailment, not readily visible.  <Sounds like a nice tank. I'm sure your Betta is happy not being kept in a tiny bowl! My Betta does the same thing. I wouldn't worry, he's fine.>  Thanks a lot for your time!  <You're welcome--Pufferpunk> 

Betta Colors Hello, I've had my beta since September, and I never really noticed until a couple of weeks ago, that his colours aren't as vibrant as before. His beautiful tail was white at the tips and pure. Right now, they have some streaks in them. He's eating normally (twice a day with Hikari Betta bio-gold pellets) and makes his bubble nests (if anything, makes them more than he used to). He pretty much doesn't' act any different than when I first got him. I change the water once ever 1.5 weeks and I put these fizz tables (Bowl Buddies from Jungle that remove chlorine, heavy metals, etc and makes tap water safe). When I change the water, I always let it sit for almost a whole day for it to be room temp. and let these tablets dissolve before putting my fish in. Is there something wrong with him?? Thanks for your time. ~Ping >>Hello :) You can try doing the water changes twice a week, and see if that perks him up. It's hard to say how old he is, perhaps he is getting on in years. Also, try feeding him some frozen bloodworms just before you do your water change (so as not to pollute the water) and see how he does. Perhaps a diet change is needed. -Gwen

Swollen.. um.. uh.. Hi. I have a question - my Betta, Pecker, is swollen if you see the pic attached.  I don't know when or how just one day I realized that he was hug like belly huge.  He doesn't have the fins sticking out as what other diseases as a pine cone.  I really don't know what to do. He's energetic and eating like crazy. He's as energetic as before.  I have two other bettas around but I love all of them.  What can I do.  Pecker seems to be so okay and nice and totally not very sickly as I can see.   I believe it's constipation since there is maybe a feces that is trailing a bit from his bottom.  Aside from thawed pea-insides, what else can I give Pecker?  If I fast Pecker, for how long do I do it?  If I fast, that also means that I don't feed him the peas?   <Hi Cheryl, from the picture I would have to guess either constipation, or a tumor.  If it is tumor there is really no way to fix it, but they can still live a while.  If the other side is swollen as well I would say constipation, if one sided, possibly a tumor.  I would start by adding some Epsom salt to his water.  Mix up 1 gallon of water with your dechlorinator and 1/2teaspoon of Epsom salt.  Do partial water changes every couple days with this water.  Feed sparingly for a few days, maybe an adult brine shrimp or so a day. Feed some brine shrimp for a few days, they are not very nutritious, but good for cleaning out the pipes.  You can offer some bits of thawed peas if he will take them.  Some frozen bloodworms will be good when you are done with the brine, the other bettas will appreciate them too, basically you want to avoid dry food for a while.  Let us know how it goes, Gage> Cheryl

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Betta Success
Doing what it takes to keep Bettas healthy long-term

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