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FAQs on Characoids/Tetras & Relatives Identification

Related Articles: Characoids/Tetras & Relatives,

Related FAQs:  Characoids/Tetras & Relatives, Characoid Behavior, Characoid Compatibility, Characoid Selection, Characoid Systems, Characoid Feeding, Characoid Disease, Characoid Reproduction,

Characin Identification      7/5/15
Greetings crew, I hope this email finds you well. I am hoping for help with identifying a fish that I have obtained. This fish came into my LFS with a shipment of Peppermint Tetras and I have been trying to properly identify it. This was the only fish of this species that came in with the shipment.
It is about 3 inches long and swims near the top or the aquarium, and is somewhat active. I figured that this was most likely some sort of schooling characin, although it hasn't been nippy or aggressive to the other fish in the tank (several Loricariids, Pencilfish, red phantom tetras). I am thinking it is very possibly a Bryconops species, possibly B. magoi, based on the caudal peduncle shape.
<Does seem a reasonable guess, or else one of the more generic Characidae.
Do note that (so far as I know) all Bryconops have coloured tail fins, typically with some sort of colouration or marking extending forwards onto the peduncle and the adipose fin. Yours doesn't, and I can't see an adipose fin at all, which pretty much rules out most of the characins. Have you access to Characoids of the World by Gery? It's an old book, late 70s, but useful for this sort of thing. Do also read:
http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2005f/zt01094p023.pdf
This paper includes a key to presently known Bryconops species.>
Unfortunately there are no characin databases or encyclopedias other than Fishbase that I was able to find for further aid.
<Have you gone through the Fishbase page for a family? For the Characidae, thus:
http://www.fishbase.org/identification/specieslist.php?famcode=102&areacode=
Note that Bryconops belongs to a different family, the Iguanodectidae :
http://www.fishbase.org/identification/specieslist.php?famcode=689&areacode=
If you use the dropdown menus, etc., to add data you know (or might be able to ascertain) you can narrow these lists down. You can ask where the fish was imported from (which might be the country it was collected from) and look on your fish to determine the number of dorsal and anal fin rays. In any case, with the lack of an adipose fin, you should also consider the
possibility this isn't a characin but a barb or Rasbora.>
Overall coloration is a shiny silver, with a yellowish tint above the lateral line and some faint yellow tinges to the caudal fin that don't really show up in these pictures. Any ideas as to what this may be? The fish is doing quite well but I'd like to know exactly what I have, mystery fish don't sit well with me.
<It isn't obvious to me what this fish is. Perhaps Bob knows? You can at least predict its needs reasonably well from its shape: open space, reasonable current, plenty of oxygen, surface feeder, likely jumpy, and of course softish sort of water chemistry.>
Thank you as always,
CL
<Cheers, Neale.>

Identification and compatibility help please   2/1/13
Hi All
<BJ>
Trust you are all good and having a great week.
<Thus far>
I was wondering if you could help - someone down the road is getting rid of his fish and asked if I would like them.
Could you help in identifying them and compatibility
<... most are small S. American Characins/Tetras... can't tell which species... some appear to be Hemigrammus sp... the last is the Dwarf Gourami, Colisa lalia>
Ok so  here is my set up
95 litres planted it has 6 - 7 male platys  6 females guppies
I have another tank (AquaTropic 80 (110L) planted tank with 10 neon tetras and 2 male guppies 7 female platys into this tank.
One of the breeds given away are 3 Blue Gourami I believe
<Don't see it/this here, but all should get along w/ what you list as already having>
But do not know what the others are.
Could you help id them and should I get them.
I have a 30L tank as well.
Many thanks in advance.
<Welcome. Bob Fenner>

Fish Identification /BobF   4/6/11
I have six fish in my aquarium that were given to be three years ago that I would like to identify. I think the person who gave them to me said they were Rasboras, but it's been so long, I can't really recall.
<Mmm, not Rasboras; small Characins, tetras... One is a Hyphessobrycon species... likely a "Serpae" tetra or related. In the same pic is a Black Emperor Tetra. The last is Gymnocorymbus... a Black Skirt Tetra>
I have two of each of the three fish in the attached pictures. I know they aren't the greatest pictures but they were not complying with my request to be still! All of them are under two inches, dart around rapidly, get along well, and harassed the Betta I had in there a while back until I took him out.
I would like to get more fish to go into the tank with them, but I'm reluctant to do so until I can identify them and make sure they are compatible with anything else I purchase.
<Good>
They are all in a 40 gallon aquarium in my classroom, so there is ample room for more fish.
Thank you for your assistance.
Rebecca Coutts
<Welcome. Please peruse the Net, or at least the little bit that is WWM re Stocking/Selection of these species, their Compatibility. Other than the Nematobrycon, these tetras are/can be quite "nippy"... best to keep in small, odd-numbered groups (5-7... individuals) so they shoal/keep to themselves in such a sufficiently large volume as you have. Bob Fenner>
Fish Identification /Neale    4/6/11
I have six fish in my aquarium that were given to be three years ago that I would like to identify. I think the person who gave them to me said they were Rasboras, but it's been so long, I can't really recall.
I have two of each of the three fish in the attached pictures. I know they aren't the greatest pictures but they were not complying with my request to be still! All of them are under two inches, dart around rapidly, get along well, and harassed the Betta I had in there a while back until I took him out.
I would like to get more fish to go into the tank with them, but I'm reluctant to do so until I can identify them and make sure they are compatible with anything else I purchase. They are all in a 40 gallon aquarium in my classroom, so there is ample room for more fish.
Thank you for your assistance.
Rebecca Coutts
<The purplish one with the black longitudinal stripe is an Emperor Tetra. The grey, disc-shaped one with the vertical bands is a Black Widow (or Petticoat) Tetra, a species that is sometimes nippy, so be careful. The reddish one is a Hyphessobrycon species of some sort, perhaps one of the very nippy Serpae Tetra variety, Hyphessobrycon callistus, though it does remind me of a less common species, Hyphessobrycon pando. All the Hyphessobrycon species have the potentially to be quite nippy, so look out for damaged fins, and don't combine with Angels, Gouramis, Guppies, etc. (or at least be prepared to remove them if needs be). All these tetras are South American fish and will do best in soft to moderately hard, acidic to slightly basic water at a middling temperature; 2-15 degrees dH, pH 6-7.5, 24-26 C/75-79 F. Cheers, Neale.>

What is it ?   11/27/09
Hi guys,
<Lesley... you've sent this post three times here, each w/ more than 10 megs of pix... We ask that folks limit these files to a few hundred Kbytes....>
Lesley from Scotland here, its been a while since I was in touch, my planted community tank now nearly 4yrs is doing great!
My daughter has a small tank now and we purchased some Endler's. I have a male in my community tank and one in my daughters along with what I thought was a female. They are very hard to come a cross the females and I thought what a stroke of luck that this wee female was swimming around with all the males so we took her home.
After looking on line she looks a bit different to the ones that I have seen on the web she is dark in colour with a neon red speckle on the rear end of her body, is she an Endler? Sorry for the bad photos but she is such a flighty little fish.
Thanks
Lesley
<These images are too blurry to be of any use. Bob Fenner>

what is it, Characiform     11/28/09
Lesley from Scotland here again,
Sorry about the influx of repeated mails, anyway I have taken a better picture. Can you help identify this wee fishy, she was swimming around in our local garden centre with a whole load of male Endler's. I assumed she was a female, but she looks a lot different to the pictures on the net.
Thanks for all your assistance once again.
Lesley
<Hello Lesley. The fish looks to be Hemigrammus hyanuary, or something very similar. Small, harmless schooling fish from South America; adaptable, but don't keep in hard water. Now, please do note that *again* you sent along big photos, 5 MB in total. Our e-mail server bounces back e-mail once the
account reaches 10 MB in total, and that means that messages like yours can cause other peoples' messages to be bounced back to them. That's clearly not fair. We do very explicitly ask for photos around 500 KB in size. If that means you have to set aside another 10 seconds from your life to resize the image in iPhoto or whatever, consider that the "coin of the realm" around these parts. Actually, what it's about is politeness: it's what we ask, and it's what we need to be able to help everyone, not just those people who don't care to read the rules. Hope that this clarifies things. Cheers, Neale.>

Are there such a thing as Serpae tetra subspecies? 05/25/09
Hi all,
Firstly thanks for all the help with the SAP, plus the website is amazing!  I just picked up another Serpae tetra today (I miscounted the last time and
only had 11) so the total is now up to 12. This new tetra looks identical to the other 11 tetras in the school--except s/he is lacking the black dot located behind the eye. At first I thought it was stress-related but the fish has adapted well and is eating... but no spot.  Is there such a thing as subspecies?
<The "subspecies" concept does indeed exist, humans for example being a subspecies of Homo sapiens, Homo sapiens compared with Neanderthal Man, Homo sapiens neanderthalensis.>
The 11 Serpaes look like this:
http://badmanstropicalfish.com/stats/characins_stats/stats_characins2e.html
And the new Serpae looks like this:
http://badmanstropicalfish.com/profiles/profile75_comment.html
Thanks
<The problem here is that what the industry calls "Serpae Tetras" can be any one of multiple closely related species in the genus Hyphessobrycon.
While Hyphessobrycon eques is probably the most commonly traded member of the Serpae Tetra Species Complex, other species of Hyphessobrycon may be traded periodically as well. Even within Hyphessobrycon eques there is substantial variation between geographical populations, and artificial varieties further muddy the waters. The absence of the black spot above the shoulder (called a humeral spot) could easily be explained by any of these reasons. This variation has probably meant that what people report when keeping "Serpae Tetras" has been very variable over the years. True Serpae Tetras -- Hyphessobrycon eques -- are noted for being aggressive feeders and have a feeding frenzy behaviour very similar to that of large, predatory characins such as Piranhas and Exodon paradoxus. They are also distinctly nippy, and will take bites at slow-moving fish such as Corydoras, Platies, Angelfish, Guppies and so on. Personally, I do not recommend them as community fish at all. In fact they were my first ever tropical fish, and the species with which I learned not to trust without verification anything the pet show owner said! After I added some Angelfish and Gouramis to my tank, I was shocked to see the carnage, and from that point onwards have been much more critical about the information casually

ID help please-- 02/28/09 Hello WWM Crew, The other day, I found these "Emperor Tetras" at a LFS. I have found only two pictures of them online, under the name Black Emperor Tetra. Can you tell me anything about these guys? I suspect they are Nematobrycon amphiloxus, but I cannot find definitive info about this. Can you confirm this? Do these guys get large like the typical emperors or stay small like kerris? Are these rare or new in the hobby? Any help appreciated, I have five in a planted tank and have attached pictures (sorry, kind of blurry). Thanks, J.P. <Greetings. Your fish is indeed the species traded as Nematobrycon amphiloxus, or the Black Emperor Tetra. However, Nematobrycon amphiloxus is considered to be a junior synonym of Nematobrycon palmeri by ichthyologists, meaning the two fish are one and the same thing. So any information that applies to the one applies to the other. At best, Nematobrycon amphiloxus is a colour morph of Nematobrycon palmeri. In any case, Emperor Tetras are fairly easy fish to maintain. They aren't that fussy about water chemistry, though very hard, very basic water should be avoided. Anything around pH 6-7.5, 5-20 degrees dH suits them well. They do need soft, acidic water for breeding though. Emperor Tetras are odd beasts in that they don't really form schools though they should be kept in groups. Males hold short-term territories around plants and shoo off other males. Females are gregarious. I always think they're a bit like teenagers at a disco, with the girls in a group, and the males each trying to attract one of to his corner of the room! Do try and keep more females than males so you can observe their behaviour whilst avoiding bullying. Anyway, they're good fish for planted communities, but because they're quite large (up to 6 cm) and infamously greedy fish, you do need to watch water quality. They're omnivores and appreciate some green foods (e.g., cooked spinach and squished tinned peas) in their diet. Generally nice fish; enjoy! Neale.>

Re: ID help please  3/1/09  Neale, Well I have 2 females and 3 males. I initially bought three and went back for the whole school, but only two remained. Mine seem to school at times, which is odd because I have kept Emperors for years and they never acted in that manner. They are really nice looking little fish. Thanks for the info! -Jayson <Likely schooling at the moment because they're juveniles or outside of the breeding season. Once settled and grown up, the males will become more territorial, so watch for any signs of nippiness between them. Great fish, and I'm sure you'll enjoy them. Be sure and feed a mixed diet for optimum colouration! Not just flake! Cheers, Neale.>

Fish identification help 2/25/09 Hello! I wonder if you can help me out. I have collected around 15 fish from a lady who was moving house and looking for someone to take her fish and re-home them.. however she was a bit vague about what she had. Whilst I recognize the upside -down catfish she gave me, plus the red-tailed black shark and the Puntius pentazona, I am not sure about the 'various tetras'. I have some pictures - could you possibly help me out and advise what I have been given?! <Fish 1 is the Diamond Tetra (Moenkhausia pittieri). A nice community fish; generally does well so long as the water isn't too hard. Fish 2 is the Colombian Tetra (Hyphessobrycon colombianus), a semi-aggressive species prone to fin-nipping but otherwise a good choice for robust community tanks. Fish 3 is one of the Rosy Tetra group, possibly Hyphessobrycon rosaceus but there are a bunch of similar-looking species such as the Bleeding Heart Hyphessobrycon erythrostigma and the Ornate Tetra Hyphessobrycon bentosi. They're all fairly good community fish, though a trifle boisterous. Fish 4 is some type of Hyphessobrycon, but to be honest I can't really tell from the photo which one.> I need to be sure these guys will be happy in with my current set up of Platies, Danios, Puntius pentazona, bristle nose Ancistrus, Trichogaster leeri and Crossocheilus Siamese (sorry for spelling, true SAE) in a 180ltr tank. I am fairly sure the red-tailed black shark will be finding alternative accommodation, as he will not get on with my SAE's I understand. <Indeed.> Also, one fish has a cloudy eye (fish 4). He seems fine, there is no sign of bulging or similar, and is eating well. I do not know his history of course, but I am treating him with caution! He is the fish which is whiter than the others and smaller in the picture. All are currently in my 'spare' 60ltr tank whilst I assess what to do with them. <Likely physical damage related to netting, transport. Should heal by itself if water quality is good. Treating with an anti-Finrot medication will help.> Thank you!
<Cheers, Neale.>

Re: fish identification help 2/25/09 Thank you so much, I had tried looking them up but scrolling through the types of tetras made me realize how very many there are! You are a walking encyclopedia of fish info Neale! Thanks Sarah <What can I say. A misspent youth. Other boys learned to do useful things like smoke, make out with girls, and dancing. Me, I learned how to tell tetras apart. Cheers, Neale.><<A good trade. RMF>>

Tetra question, ID   8/24/08 Hello guys! I bought some really pretty Tetra's today; Pristellas and some that I can't remember the name! I called the aquarium shop, but they were too busy to go look for me. <?> They look very similar in color to Pristellas, but instead of yellow, white and black on the fin, they have orange/red, white and black on the fin, and they are a little bit rounder in shape. Very similar to a Serpae Tetra, but the same color in body to the Pristella. Sort of like a Bleeding Heart, but without the red heart spot! Haha.....so, can you please help me identify my cute new friends? Thanks, Anne <Mmm, not from this description (perhaps a photo...). Do try placing these words one at time in your search tool: Hyphessobrycon, Pristella... and select "Photos"... do you see your fish? Bob Fenner>

Re: Tetra Question -08/24/08 I have one picture, but it's not very good. I have tried to search online for two days, and can't figure out what the fish is. If all else fails, I'll go back to Dallas North and look for myself. What do you think? Thanks again! <... I think you should re-read the first corr. and look... it's there. B>

 Hyphessobrycon bentosi?

Difference between FW fish species...    2/24/08 Hi! I just wanted to know what is the difference between an albino Buenos Aires tetra and an albino tinfoil barb. They look so alike and I want to make sure my LFS didn't give me the wrong fish. Thanks <This is easy. Buenos Aires tetras (Hemigrammus anisitsi) have an adipose fin, whereas Tinfoil barbs (Barbonymus schwanenfeldii) do not. Cheers, Neale.>

Re: Mystery fish! 12/30/07 Thank you so much for your suggestions. I've searched Fishbase, but so far haven't come up with a match. I was, however, successful in getting a couple of half-decent photos now that he seems more comfortable in the tank, and I'm attaching them here. It's a dark tank, so the quality isn't what it could be, but you can identify the number, shape, and placement of all fins if you look hard (they're unpigmented), see the markings (the upper band of black is more a trick of the lighting), and the mouth shape. Perhaps someone will see the picture and say "oh, of course!" <For what it's worth, I have no idea what this fish is. I'm a bit confused by the anal fin/pelvic fin arrangement. If it's a gonopodium, then it is most probably a Poeciliidae of some sort; Goodeidae tend to have less well developed gonopodia. But at first glance the fish looked like some sort of Characidium or perhaps some sort of Cyprinidae. The problem with the Cyprinidae is that there are literally thousands of species there, and many are elongate, small, and have a black bar along the midline of the flank. Does he have an adipose fin? Is there a gap between the pelvic fins and the anal fin? Is the mouth equipped with teeth or not? Cheers, Neale.>


Characidium my guess. RMF

Can you identify this for me 10/14/07 I am curious to know what kind of fish this is. I found it on the web, but so far haven't found out what it is... Thanks so much! Tamara <Tamara, would be happy too... but you sent no photo or link to photo on the web. Try again, and we'll give it the old college try! Cheers, Neale.> Re: can you identify this for me my apologies, I guess I didn't click the attach button...here it is again. Thanks!! Tamara <Greetings. That's an Emperor Tetra, Nematobrycon palmeri. And yes, they do look like that... but only when mature, and only in well-maintained tanks with a dark substrate and lots of plants. Ideally, with blackwater extract added or peat granulate in the filter. Too often they are kept in generic aquaria with plain gravel and not enough plants, and in response their colours become much more subdued (this is actually very, very common with freshwater fish, and one reason people *think* freshwater fish are less colourful than marines). So, you need a tank with lots of plants to produce shade, black sand (non-calcareous of course), good water quality, and water chemistry around 6.0-7.5, low to moderate hardness. As with any other fish, they get the best colours when well cared for, and that includes a nice varied diet including both meaty (bloodworms, daphnia, etc.) and green (algae-based flake) foods. The males are quite feisty, so keep a good size group with more females than males if you can. Six would be a good start, but ten would be better. (People often just buy males of these and other fish, but paradoxically this does nothing to enhance the look of the tank: You need enough males that they all "colour up" while displaying to one another, but also enough females that the males get "in the mood" in the first place, and also enough females that aggression between males is diluted throughout the school.) Colour also depends on what lighting you use: blue lights (like Tritons) will accentuate the blue colours on the fish, while purple lights (like Gro Lux) bring out the red/purple shades. So a mix of lamps in the hood would be ideal. Lovely, lovely fish, though often underrated when seen in bare, brightly-lit tanks at the shops. There's a look-alike species called Inpaichthys kerri, sometimes sold as the Emperor, but among aquarists better known as the Blue Tetra. As its name suggests, it is more blue than purple, but otherwise the two species are very much alike in requirements and habits. Both are excellent community fish. Cheers, Neale>

Tetra ID How can I identify tetra.  I've tried to find out but found nothing.   It's important. <browse through our archives at www.wetwebmedia.com to find your fish or a similar fish. Take note of similar genera and then carry them over to http://www.fishbase.org to search a huge database for the species you seek. Best regards, Anthony>

Mystery Tetra - 08/04/2005 Hello, <Hi, Lynn!  Sabrina sleuthing with you today....> You guys seem to be my last hope.  I've been to Fishbase, Googled the web and searched your site extensively.  I found a fish when I was at one of the local Fish stores, and I decided to come home and research the fish first.  There was nothing on the tank other than the common name, and all the fish people were up to their elbows in questions.  The name of the fish is the Similan Tetra.  On the tank was a note saying that although they look like Neons and cardinals, they are not the same fish.  I assumed I would be able to track the fish down on Fishbase, so I didn't bother any of the fish store employees to get the Latin name (last time I do that). <Can you describe this fish in detail?  I'm familiar with a great many tetras, and I've got a few friends that are tetra freaks, so among us, perhaps we can figure this out.> I would really appreciate any help you may be able to give me identifying what the Latin name is so I can do more research before I try to add it to my stocking list for my brand new Tetra tank.  The fish store is 2 hours away, so I can't just run over there and ask.  My tank is cycled and my quarantine tank will be up this weekend (sponge filter in the main, cycled tank) all per the guidelines y'all have on your website. <Excellent!> You guys are my only hope on identifying this Tetra!  I've delayed stocking any fish for the last week while I tried to track down this fish.  Thank you for any help you might be able to give me with this question. <None, without a very detailed description....  If you write back, put my name in the subject line.> ~Lynn <Wishing you well,  -Sabrina>

Mystery Tetra - II - 08/07/2005 Sabrina, <Hello again, Lynn!> Sorry for not describing the fish.  It looked like a neon tetra, but with Blue and Green stripes (kind of blended together) instead of the red and blue.  The ones they had were between a tank on Neons on the left and cardinals on the right.  I don't know the ages of the fish, but the Neons were smaller and the cardinals  were bigger than the Similans.  The Similans were under an inch long maybe .75 inches or so.  Other than that, they pretty much looked like neon tetras with green & blue bodies.   <Mm, a number of possibilities, here; take a look at Paracheirodon simulans, the "green neon" tetra - http://www.fishbase.org/Summary/speciesSummary.php?ID=12394&genusname=Paracheirodon&speciesname=simulans .  Also Boehlkea fredcochui - http://www.fishbase.org/Summary/speciesSummary.php?ID=12341&genusname=Boehlkea&speciesname=fredcochui .  Be sure to do google image searches on the Latin names.  P. simulans' species name does indeed suggest it might be a match.> If I can figure out what this little guy is, and if he is compatible, I would like to house him in a 55 gal planted tank.  I'm thinking about stocking Clown loaches (3 for snail control), <Any chance you would consider a smaller species of loach?  I find that Botia striata are one of the most efficient snail eaters I've ever met - and they top out around a couple inches.  Clowns are slow growers, but I've seen 'em well over a foot in length.  Just something to consider.> Otos (6 - start with 8 with one or two heading over to the Beta Tank when it starts looking green), Corys (4- start with 7 because 3 will move over to the Betta tank in a month or two) false rummy-nose tetras (8), black neon tetras (8), neon tetras (8), and maybe these little green/blue mystery guys (8).   <To be quite honest, I would assume these mystery fish are quite compatible and have similar care requirements.  P. simulans should be a fine addition, if that is what they are.  Worst case scenario?  Take 'em back to the store if they don't work out.  I normally do NOT advocate purchasing something you know next-to-nothing about, but when faced with a brand new fish I've never, ever seen in stores before, I often will start rearranging tanks so I'll have a quarantine for them. ;) > Thanks Sabrina for your help! <You bet!  Wishing you well,  -Sabrina>

Freshwater fish identifications, ChuckR Hi there I need to identify two fish to find out more about them. The one was called a "black widow" in the shop I bought it from. Its shape is very similar to a silver dollar. It is mostly black on the top half of its body and the tail is silver. Apprx 2cm long. I've looked everywhere for information on this fish but can not get anything, except black widow tetra, which I do not think it is. (saw a picture somewhere) < The black skirt tetra is sometimes called the black widow tetra. If this is not your fish then you will need to provide more info like a photo.> The other fish is definitely a goby, no doubt about that. It is white with black spots, and a small black "stripe" at the back of its top fin. The sizes are apprx 3 & 5cm each. The shop owner said its a spotted goby and that the female is the bigger one of the two, but alas, I can find no information/pictures on what it actually is. It is a very shay fish. <Look at photos of the knight goby (Stigmatogobius sadanundio ). Males have longer fins.> Both are freshwater fish. I've got two male guppies in the tank and sometime during today, the one lost half of its tail fin. I doubt that it will be the "black widow" because they've been sharing a tank for 2 months now. < The gobies are capable of biting the tail of smaller fish thinking that they are food.-Chuck> Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanking you in anticipation. Jaco Ps. If it is a stupid question or I can find the info somewhere else, please tell me so.

Freshwater fish identifications, BobF Hi there I need to identify two fish to find out more about them. The one was called a "black widow" in the shop I bought it from. Its shape is very similar to a silver dollar. It is mostly black on the top half of its body and the tail is silver. Apprx 2cm long. I've looked everywhere for information on this fish but can not get anything, except black widow tetra, which I do not think it is. (saw a picture somewhere) <Likely a Black Skirt Tetra... there are varieties, differences within this species: http://freshaquarium.about.com/cs/characins2/a/blackwidow.htm> The other fish is definitely a goby, no doubt about that. It is white with black spots, and a small black "stripe" at the back of its top fin. The sizes are apprx 3 & 5 cm each. The shop owner said its a spotted goby and that the female is the bigger one of the two, but alas, I can find no information/pictures on what it actually is. It is a very shy fish. <Maybe a knight goby: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/BrackishSubWebIndex/bracgobioids.htm> Both are freshwater fish. I've got two male guppies in the tank and sometime during today, the one lost half of its tail fin. <Could be from either of the above> I doubt that it will be the "black widow" because they've been sharing a tank for 2 months now. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanking you in anticipation. Jaco Ps. If it is a stupid question or I can find the info somewhere else, please tell me so. <Be chatting, Bob Fenner who encourages you to investigate before you buy livestock>

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