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We ask that, before submitting a query, you refer to Neale Monk's: Before You Write; A Checklist of Common Problems with Freshwater Aquaria, Bettas, Goldfish, and Freshwater Turtles (Terrapins), Tips on Asking Questions, Ask the WWM Crew a Question, FAQs on FAQs. EDFP, TBPFWFAQs, Last Few Days Accrued FAQs, Subscribe to the Daily Pics

Astronotus ocellatus (Agassiz 1831), the Oscar. To seventeen inches (45.7 cm). South America: Rio Amazonas basin in Peru, Colombia, Brazil, Northern Paraguay and French Guiana. Freshwater: pH range: 6.0 - 8.0; dH range: 5.0 - 19.0, temp. 22 - 25°C. Wild type at  the Shedd Aq. 2015 
  Freshwater Pix Archive Link

Freshwater FAQs, Ask us a question: Crew@WetWebMedia.com

Updated 2/21/2019
Other Specialized Daily FAQs Blogs: General, Planted Tanks, Ponds, Brackish, Last Few Days Accrued FAQs,
Daily Q&A replies/input from the WWM crew: Darrel Barton,
Neale Monks, Marco Lichtenberger, Bob Fenner, are posted here. Moved about, re-organized daily Current Crew Bios., Not so current Crew Bios
____________________________________________________________

New Print and eBook on Amazon

Betta Success
Doing what it takes to keep Bettas healthy long-term

by Robert (Bob) Fenner

Ebony, a fish with fin slits
This is Ebony, she is a sweetheart.
<Hi Jade; the file/image isn't coming up. Would you please attach it here/ with your mail?>
I got her from Wal-Mart. She lives in a ten gallon tank with a larger fish and another very small fish. I feed her pellets and fish flakes. I sometimes hand feed them. There's only fake plants. I do a 25% water change every two days and I clean the entire tank at least once every two months. She has a water filter and bubblier. I use a water clarifier and a stress coat as directed. I currently do not have a water heater. I am afraid that there is something wrong with her. She appears to have some slits (2) in her tail and her entire left fin seems to have many slits throughout it and its worn down around the outside.
What do you think is wrong with her and what can I do to help her at home?
Thanks.
Preview attachment 20190220_135632.jpg
<https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0?ui=2&ik=3bdbb8b10a&attid=0.1&permmsgid=msg
-f:1626016752841302489&th=1690c59f27f0a1d9&view=att&disp=safe&realattid=1690
c5894843e971e0e1>
20190220_135632.jpg
3.9 MB
Re: Ebony, a fish with fin slits

Is this good?
<Yes; other than the file being an order of magnitude too large. I see your goldfish... Likely the issue here is environmental. Please read here: http://wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebindex/gldfshsystems.htm
and the linked files above. It is very hard to keep a small system stable and optimized for goldfish.
Bob Fenner>

Discus Tank Setup       2/20/19
Hi Team,
<Shriram>
I have recently purchased a 50 gallon and have some discus and rosy barbs housed in the tank.
<Mmm; well these fishes really "like" different water quality: Warm, soft, acidic vs. cooler, harder, alkaline>
The tank has a driftwood and an artificial plant setup on one side of the tank and the rest of the tank being empty and bare bottomed.
<... not suitable for Symphysodon>

I observed that the discus prefer sitting behind the decorations and seldom come out for a swim.
<Expected here>
They all seems to be comfortable there. There is one pair of blue diamond which doesn't come out like the others for food as well.
<... I'd be concerned if they've been here for much time>
Is there something I am missing or that I need to do to make my discus make more use of the space rather then sitting in one corner.
<Yes... Read here re:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/discusfish.htm and the linked files above>
This is my first discus tank.
As of feeding, I am currently feeding them a mix of tetra bytes, Hikari gold and frozen Tubifex worm.
<... Only the latter will be taken by Discus. See WWM re feeding.... >
Look forward for your advise.
<You should investigate before buying livestock. Bob Fenner>
Thanks and regards,
Shriram
Re: Discus Tank Setup

Hey Bob,
Thanks for getting back.
<Welcome Shriram>
From my understanding, I should probably be placing driftwood spread across the tank to mimic their natural environment, instead of at one corner of the tank.
<One aspect, yes... and plantings>
I usually switch on the tank light, let it run for a while and then place the food in the tank. The one discus pair I was telling about doesn't seem to come out when the light is switched on compared to others. I have seen them come out when the light is switched off.
Does this indicate anything in specific.
<Mate... you haven't read where I referred you>
Do you have any advise on creating a black water setup for the discus, does that help?
Thanks and regards,
Shriram
Discus Tank Setup /Neale

Hi Team,
<Hello Shriram,>
I have recently purchased a 50 gallon and have some discus and rosy barbs housed in the tank.
<Discus can be contained in tanks this size, certainly as singletons or pairs. Groups will not thrive though. Too much risk of aggression because you need at least 6 specimens for them to get along as sexually mature adults. Furthermore, Rosy Barbs are subtropical fish. They won't last long at the 28-30 C needed for Discus.>
The tank has a driftwood and an artificial plant setup on one side of the tank and the rest of the tank being empty and bare bottomed.
<The bare bottom will reflect light, stressing Discus. Do use a thin layer of dark, lime-free sand or gravel. Even a few mm will do the trick while remaining easy to clean.>
I observed that the discus prefer sitting behind the decorations and seldom come out for a swim.
<I bet. See above.>
They all seems to be comfortable there. There is one pair of blue diamond which doesn't come out like the others for food as well. Is there something I am missing or that I need to do to make my discus make more use of the space rather then sitting in one corner.
<Do read above; Discus are not sociable in small groups, at least when sexually mature, and large groups (6+ specimens) will need more space. They are afraid of bright light, especially upwelling bright light, so a dark substrate and overhead share are both essential.>
This is my first discus tank.
<Plenty of websites and books; do bear in mind many accounts of Discus kept in small tanks without sand/gravel are breeding tanks, and used for mated pairs rather than communities like yours.>
As of feeding, I am currently feeding them a mix of tetra bytes, Hikari gold and frozen tubiflex worm.
<I'd probably avoid Tubifex. Too risky. Good quality flake and pellets are fine, alongside finely minced white fish fillet and seafood.>
Look forward for your advise.
Thanks and regards,
Shriram
<Cheers, Neale.>

Goldfish Listless need help /RMF     2/19/19
Hi and thanks for your help,
I have a 22 year old goldfish who has been very listless at bottom of tank for about 1 week. He will eat if encouraged but does not come to eat unless encouraged. He's in a 55 gallon tank had ph 7.5 I buy spring water for his tank have for 8 years.
<Mmm; does this store-bought water have sufficient hardness, alkalinity?>
no nitrite or ammonia in tank. Some nitrate but not above 40ppm.
<Do please see WWM re Nitrate control. I would strive to keep this under 20 ppm>
His scales fins look good and his eyes. His fins are clamped though. I change water every 12 days to two weeks max. I use a bit of aquarium salt but not to excess about 1 tablespoon per ten to 15 gallons.
I treated him for parasites as he had a very long white poop and clamped fins. But the treatment didn't help. ( called general cure by API).
<Am familiar>
Is constipation the problem ?
<Doubtful; almost assuredly environmental; the Nitrate et al.>
I am not feeding him his normal tetra flake food now. I fed him a few baby organic spinach leaves I had boiled first yesterday. Nothing today yet. When he does swim he looks fine. He is not breathing heavily. His gills appear normal. He isn't breathing very obviously. He is normal in color - a large /white fish about the size of my hand. He had seemed slightly bloated but he has never been thin so can't tell if he actually was bloated or not. He ate the spinach offered last night.
Thank you !
Lina and Fishy
<Were it mine, I'd execute a good sized water change (perhaps 15-20 gallons); add some sodium bicarbonate (maybe five teaspoons, mixed in the new water), and (try to) be patient.
<Goldfish do "go through spells" of inactivity at time; though likely metabolite poisoning is at play here a bit... most easily reduced via dilution/water change, addition of a bit of bicarb., and salt.
Bob Fenner>
Goldfish Listless need help /Neale      2/19/19

Hi and thanks for your help, I have a 22 year old goldfish who has been very listless at bottom of tank for about 1 week. He will eat if encouraged but does not come to eat unless encouraged. He's in a 55 gallon tank had ph 7.5 I buy spring water for his tank have for 8 years . no nitrite or ammonia in tank. Some nitrate but not above 40ppm. His scales fins look good and his eyes. His fins are clamped though. I change water every 12 days to two weeks max. I use a bit of aquarium salt but not to excess about 1 tablespoon per ten to 15 gallons. I treated him for parasites as he had a very long white poop and clamped fins. But the treatment didn't help. (
called general cure by API). Is constipation the problem ?
<Certainly sounds like one possibility. Listlessness, lack of appetite, and long stringy faeces can be indicators of constipation. Do read: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/gldfshmalnut.htm
Going to suggest some further reading, re: diet, housing, etc., here:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/goldfish101art.htm
Most problems with Goldfish are caused by diet and environment; while infections do occur, they're rare, and when they do happen, there's usually some environmental or dietary cause.>
I am not feeding him his normal tetra flake food now. I fed him a few baby organic spinach leaves I had boiled first yesterday. Nothing today yet.
When he does swim he looks fine. He is not breathing heavily. His gills appear normal. He isn't breathing very obviously. He is normal in color - a large /white fish about the size of my hand. He had seemed slightly bloated but he has never been thin so can't tell if he actually was bloated or not.
He ate the spinach offered last night.
<Well, that's promising! Do also try cooked peas, squished to make them easier to eat. Many other green foods will be eaten; see above links.>
Thank you !
Lina and Fishy
<Hope this helps. Cheers, Neale.>
Re: Goldfish Listless need help     2/19/19

Thank you so much !! He is better this afternoon so I fed him his usual but not as much as usual. I will start adding greens with his food a few times per week
<Real good>
The water has never been a problem but air am testing it now for alkalinity. I had added some more aquarium salt this morning. Thank you Thank you thank you ! PS I've added a Nitrazorb pouch to his filter to
bring the nitrates down. Lina
<Very good indeed. Thank you DW II! BobF>
Re: Goldfish Listless need help     2/19/19

Hi Bob I tested the tank water for KH it is 5 degrees or about 100ppm according to the test kit and the GH is 11 degrees or about 200ppm. but Every time I do test the PH it is 7.4 exactly. What do you think ?
<These values are okay... Is your tap/source water not suitable by itself?
Bottled water is not only inconvenient and expensive, but often unnecessary. DO you drink, cook w/ your tap water? If so, it is fine for your aquarium use. DO read on WWM re water treatment>
My 22 year old gold fish has revived a lot today. Don't want to mess up his health as it seems improving from yesterday and last week. The tap water here is terrible so I have been buying natural spring water which I always test called Earth20. Supposedly it is 100 percent natural spring water from Opal Springs Culver Oregon. Have been using this same brand for 8 years in the tank with fine result.
Thanks again for your input !
Luna ( dancer and fish enthusiast. - but I am not a scientist although I do try !)
<Cheers Lina. BobF>
Re: Goldfish Listless need help      2/19/19

Thank you No I don't drink the tapwater it is 14 ph !
<.... Mmm; not this basic I'd warrant... Like drinking drain or oven cleaner... but you make the point>
It's an old well. I drink what the fish drinks. Thank you for the input on those values.
Cheers.! Lina Downes
<Cheers Lina. BobF>

Help! My molly is on the gravel gasping for breath.       2/17/19
Tank
What is the water volume of the tank? 20g
How long has the tank been running? Since September 2018
Does it have a filter? Yes
Does it have a heater<https://www.fishlore.com/amazon/heater>? Yes
What is the water temperature? 78f
What is the entire stocking of this tank? (Please list all fish and inverts.) 8 adult mollies<https://www.fishlore.com/Profiles-Mollies.htm> and platys, 8 itsy bitsy baby platys (that will be moved when they are bigger), two zebra Nerites<https://www.fishlore.com/amazon/neritesnail>
Maintenance
How often do you change the water? Weekly (tomorrow, Saturday, is water change day)
How much of the water do you change? 30%
What do you use to treat your water? AquaSafe<https://www.fishlore.com/amazon/aquasafe>
Do you vacuum the substrate<https://www.fishlore.com/amazon/substrate> or just the water? Just the water
*Parameters - Very Important
Did you cycle your tank before adding fish? Yes
What do you use to test the water? API<https://www.fishlore.com/amazon/api> liquid test<https://www.fishlore.com/amazon/testkit> kit
What are your parameters? We need to know the exact numbers, not just “fine” or “safe”.
Ammonia: 0.25 ppm<https://www.fishlore.com/fishdictionary/p.htm#ppm>
<Toxic; and very debilitating for mollies... This is highly likely the cause of the position, gasping>
<Hopefully will be solved with the water change... I'd do NOW>
Nitrite: 0 ppm
Nitrate: 5.0 ppm
pH: 8.2
Feeding
How often do you feed your fish? twice daily
How much do you feed your fish? a ground up pinch of flakes
What brand of food do you feed your fish? Aqueon<https://www.fishlore.com/amazon/aqueon>  Tropical Flakes
Do you feed frozen or freeze-dried foods? No
<I would add some "greenery" here. Please read: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/mollyfdgfaqs.htm>
Illness & Symptoms
How long have you had this fish? Since September 2018
How long ago did you first notice these symptoms? Today
In a few words, can you explain the symptoms? My male molly is lying on the gravel<https://www.fishlore.com/amazon/gravel> , gasping for breath
Have you started any treatment for the illness? no
Was your fish physically ill or injured upon purchase? no
How has its behavior and appearance changed, if at all? Appearance is actually good
Explain your emergency situation in detail. (Please give a clear explanation of what is going on, include details from the beginning of the illness leading up to now) My male molly is lying on the gravel, gasping for breath. I noticed this when I was feeding them breakfast. He did eat, but has spent every other minute today on the gravel, gasping.
<Do you add a modicum of aquarium salt to this system? All the organisms you list, including the Nerite snails can tolerate, if not appreciate some. Please read Neale's piece here: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/mollies.htm
Bob Fenner>

Guppy       2/17/19
Hi
I have a problem with guppy fish
<I see... the symptoms of Columnaris in your pix>
I've spent all the fish
I tried a lot but to no avail
Please help me and direct me to the medication that will save me from this disease .
<... Need information re your system, what else is in the tank; water quality test results, history of maintenance, treatment. DO READ on WWM re:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/ColumnarisF.htm
Bob Fenner>

3 y.o. Albino African Clawed Frog, Pinky  14 megs...   2/16/19
Hello,
<Hello!>
My female frog laid eggs twice last month and seemed lethargic before and after, which is her normal behavior during this time.
<And not uncommon among amphibians, post-egg-laying.>
The lethargy didn't go away and her tank was pretty filthy, but she was eating, as far as I know.
<Always a good indicator of overall health; if you see your frog eating, it's probably okay, or at least treatable even if there are signs of injury or disease.>
This past Monday when I came home and went over to her and looked at her face to face, the tip of her face (nose and mouth area) looked cyanotic. I panicked and figured her tank water was possibly poisoning her or asphyxiating her, so I quickly took her out of her tank and put her in her temporary tank with straight tap water.
<When amphibians (or for that matter fish) look oxygen-starved, a good approach is to lower the water level so that splashing from the filter is increased. This raises oxygen level. Since water quality might also be a factor, doing a substantial water change is always a good idea too. Physically transporting stressed animals to another tank might be worth doing, but only if the new aquarium has otherwise identical conditions (water chemistry and temperature in particular) or at the very least you slowly adapt them (which might be necessary if the home aquarium was too warm, for example, and while cooling the frogs down is necessary, you'd need to do so in stages to avoid shock).>
There was no time to let the water air itself out for 24hrs. I figured it couldn't be any worse than the water she was in, which seemed to be hurting her.
<Unfortunately this isn't always a good approach. Sudden changes, even to the better, can cause shock. Best to make small, incremental changes across a long period of time. For example, you could lower the waterline to increase splashing from the filter, while changing 10-20% of the water every couple of hours.>
I also remembered talking to a worker at a PetSmart who said he had the same species frog and kept it in a small tank in the bathroom and always just replaced the water with straight tap.
<Unwise. Chlorine will cause stress. Some water contains ammonia too, and again, severe source of stress.>
I then proceeded to clean the entire tank, complete water and media change in the filter.
<Do not change all of the filter media please, ever! No more than 50% at any one time, and at least 6 weeks before changing more media. Chemical media, such as carbon, is the exception. But filter wool, ceramic noodles, sponges, etc. should not be changed too often.>
I did leave the slightest, slightest water at the bottom of the tank with the gravel. Cleaned her plants, rocks, and cave by hand under tap water, didn't scrub them clean like I usually do to remove the greenish stuff that grows on them. I figured there was some good bacteria on there for her safety, since I did a 99% water change. There was a lot of old ReptoMin pellets and about 3 old shrimp mixed with the rocks, also some loose skin. The tank definitely needed a good clean.
<I dare say. But keep changes to a minimum. Cleaning out muck (e.g., with a net, or by removing rocks for cleaning under a tap, or by using a turkey baster to pipette out muck will all be fine). But doing a deep clean where you remove everything, even the water, is really a risky move. In theory it's fine if the new water is identical (water chemistry and temperature) to the old water, and the biological filter media is left intact, but these are things you should plan around before you get started. Otherwise, the risk is you'll remove the filtration bacteria and/or expose the frog or fish to dramatic changes in water chemistry and temperature.>
I had expired ammonia and nitrate/alkalinity strips which I used and the water indicated to me within normal limits. The cyanotic appearance on her face looked like it was worsening, and when I used the test strips in her temporary tank they didn't come out as good as her newly cleaned permanent tank, so I placed her bank into her permanent, full time tank, all within about 4 hrs. She seemed to settle back into her tank, but didn't eat anything. That was 3 days ago and still hasn't eaten anything at all.
<Looking at the photos, your frog looks bloated, very bloated. Chances are you're dealing with a bacterial infection. I'm going to direct you to some reading, here:
http://www.xenopus.com/disease.htm
You're going to need antibiotics alongside aquarium salt (at a dose of around 2 gram per litre of water). The antibiotic will help deal with the infection, while the salt helps remove some of the bloating, reducing the symptoms.>
The clean tap water has now had a chance to air itself out, with her in the tank. Could it just be that everything was to shocking to her system?
<Could indeed.>
I would also say that today her face looks normal again, no more reddish purple appearance, thank goodness! The only thing she has ever eaten are ReptoMin pellets and freeze dried shrimp (which she normally LOVES, but wants no part of now), she doesn't eat anything at all. I just noticed that she's laying on top of her tall plant, which goes to the top of her water. She loves laying at the tippy top, but hadn't been doing that either, until now for a short while. She seems better today then yesterday, except for the not eating anything. I read in a website that they can go for a month without eating, so that would give me time to see improvement. What could be wrong, what can I do?
<See above.>
Should I wait and keep observing her, or should I take her to the animal hospital?
<Some vets can advise, but chances are they'll simply recommend antibiotics and salt as mentioned above. Xenopus are widely kept in labs, so there's a good literature available on their healthcare. This is unlike the situation for most other amphibians, which is one reason Xenopus are a good choice for hobbyists.>
They have specialists which specialize in exotic pets...I've never taken her anywhere. She's always been great. I'm attaching a few photos. I appreciate any help and guidance, thank you in advance.
Mary Luz
<Do hope this helps, Neale.>

Re: 3 y.o. Albino African Clawed Frog, Pinky     2/16/19
Hello Neale and thank you for your thorough response, I really appreciate everything you wrote.
<Glad to hear it!>
I know she may appear bloated to you, but not to me.
<Maybe not, but I do believe she looks bloated. If you very carefully handle her, you would feel she's a bit "puffy" to the touch, but I would not recommend trying this unless you understand how easily amphibians are damaged when handled roughly.>
She's normally bigger up top and her thighs are usually a lot more chunky.
<Understood.>
She's definitely thinned out a lot along the bottom side of her back, I can see a thinner waist with the end of the ribcage I imagine. I mean, you know a lot better than I do as to what a bloated ACF looks like, so I don't really know.
<Do look on Google for some photos and make your comparisons. After all, you're best placed to judge, not me!>
If she takes the antibiotics and the salts and didn't really need them, can they hurt her?
<No, if used as stated. Xenopus tolerate salt very well, so 2 gram/litre will have no negative impact on her health. Wild specimens even occur in brackish water! The antibiotics will hopefully treat whatever underlying problem you're dealing with.>
Also, can she live up to a month without eating?
<Yes. Easily, if she was in good shape beforehand. Of course I'd still offer enticing meals every 4-5 days, and with luck, the medication and salt will kick in, and she'll be ready to eat a few days after you start treating her.>
By the time I order the antibiotics and salts and get them, it will be a few days. It would probably be quicker if I took her into the hospital?
<If you are prepared to do that, and a vet is willing to treat a frog (do call them first, some don't) then yes, a visit to the vet is always the best possible move.>
And hopefully they will have everything at hand. Do you have these supplies?
<No. I'm in England, where antibiotics are prescription-only, so I'd be visiting a vet for them. Salt, of course, is sold anywhere, and non-iodised (sometimes called "kosher") table salt will do the trick just fine. Just be sure to thoroughly dissolve the required dose in warm water first, then add it to the aquarium, a little at a time, across an hour or so. If your tank contains 60 litres for example, you'd dissolve 120 grams into a kitchen jug of warm water, and then add that in stages across an hour. With each subsequent water change, add the necessary amount to each bucket, so if you change 9 litres (a typical small bucket) then you'd add 18 grams to that bucket, dissolve thoroughly, then add to the tank.>
Are you in NJ by any chance.
<No.>
Is she going to die?
<I hope not. Xenopus are extremely tough animals, which is why they're such popular lab animals. But amphibians are difficult to treat since we're not really clued up on their medical needs. So I'd be optimistic, but can't offer a guarantee.>
On Monday, when I put her into the temporary tank, I also remember the back of her left thigh starting to appear darkish purple under the skin. I was wondering if there was an organ there that was being affected at the time.
<Dark patches on the legs might be bruising, but do also be aware of Red Leg, described on the webpage on Xenopus health I sent you last time.>
That went away that night after I placed her back into her permanent cleaned tank. The only thing that stands out to me now, is a faint blemish she has on her chest/belly area, slightly to the left of her midline. It's very minor, but that's the only thing that stands out to me, except for her looking thinner. That blemish I have to say was there before Monday when I came home and she looked cyanotic. I thought maybe she had hurt herself somehow, but is still there. Could that be a sign of a bacterial problem?
<Could be; or bruising from rough handling.>
Thank you again for your help.
Mary Luz
<Most welcome. Neale.>
Re: 3 y.o. Albino African Clawed Frog, Pinky.... crashed our mail svc....  Another 17 plus megs... TOO LARGE FILES/Deleted  Sorry to all else who tried to write in; this person didn't follow our guidelines    2/16/19
I forgot to include this picture, I tried to get the blemish, but didn't come out to clear. Also, I took about an inch level of water tonight after reading your email, so the water has more splash and gets oxygenated better.
<That should help. Neale.>

Re: 3 y.o. Albino African Clawed Frog, Pinky       2/17/19
SHE ATE!!! She just snatched a freshly placed pellet and pulled it into her mouth!! So happy I could cry.
<Good news indeed.>
She only took one, but that's such an improvement. I often wonder if she has trouble seeing. Thank you again for all the feedback, so appreciated.
<Welcome.>
I will continue corresponding regarding her progress if you don't mind, until she's back to normal.
<Sure thing.>
It's like consulting with your mom when you have your first baby and feel lost and scared when they're sick and you have no idea as to what to do.
<Understood. Cheers, Neale.>
Re: 3 y.o. Albino African Clawed Frog, Pinky       2/17/19

Hello again....thought of another question. Pinky laid eggs twice recently. Every time she lays eggs, she ends up eating them, and I let her. After the first time she laid eggs 2 yrs ago. I read online that they could be removed from the tank or left and the frog would just eat them. Do you not recommend this?
<I remove the eggs from my Axolotl tank, and would remove doing so from a Xenopus tank too. Unlikely to cause ill health, but they are extra protein in the tank that will affect (negatively) water quality by placing additional workload on the filter. Whether alive or decaying, eggs will also be consuming some oxygen from the water. Cheers, Neale.>

2019 Guest Post Ideas; Betta f'      2/15/19
Hi,
<Howsit?>
I hope you are well. I am Janice Wiging, Content Editor at nippyfish.net. Our website has 38 domain authority and monthly traffic is 13.4k.
<Ahh, have looked. Very nice>
I came across your website while looking for resources for my upcoming article & found the content on your website really engaging.
I'd love to contribute an original piece of writing to your website. Would you be open to considering a submission from me?
<Yes; we do purchase, post new content>
I have some topic ideas which I think would be a perfect fit for your website:
1) How we can feed a Betta Fish Step By Step?
2) Must Know Top 5 Betta Fish Food
3) How many days can a Betta fish go without food
Please select one from the above which suits you best, but I am open to suggestions.
<Mmm; I see these topics have been covered on your site, and elsewhere on the Net... adequately. Folks are sure to find, read them placed already via search tools.>

Thank you for your time. I hope to hear from you soon.
<Thank you for your offer; and efforts in helping to provide useful, actionable information to fellow hobbyists. I encourage you to write, make submission to analog magazines in our field (ornamental aquatics); when you have enough graphics, text, to compile a given subject into an eBook, direct-to-print work.>
Best Wishes,
Janice Wiging
Content Editor| www.nippyfish.net
<And you, Bob Fenner, Head Cheerleader, WWM>

White/red spots on pectoral fins of cichlids      2/13/19
Hello WWM,
<Hey Matt>
My name is Matt and I had a couple questions about my pair of festae cichlids I've owned for about 7 years or so. They seem to have a white spot looking growth on their pectoral fins. It can be a bit red as well, but that may be from the pectoral fin being "inflamed".
<I see both of these in your pix>
I'm not sure if vein is the correct terminology, but they seem to grow on the "vein" of the pectoral fins.
<These are "soft fin rays" in the most usual parlance... but do have blood vessels associated>
A little background about the pair:
Both cichlids are housed in a 135 gallon aquarium, eat very well, and breed every month and a half or so. The male is 12 inches, and the female is 9 inches. They have had this on their pectoral fins for at least a year now, maybe a bit longer. It hasn't seemed to cause any problems, but it also hasn't seemed to have gotten better, in fact it seems to have gotten slightly worse.
I'm wondering if it is something I should be concerned about?
<Mmm, could be... see below>
And also if there is any way to treat it. I have attached some photos of both the male and the female festae. Thanks in advance, I browse your questions and answers from time to time.
-Matt
<These "spots" are highly likely evidence of physical trauma... a bending, breaking of the aforementioned fin rays... Perhaps from a usual tussle twixt the pair, or a dash into something hard in the tank. Most all such injuries heal themselves in time... just providing good care (water quality, nutrition...). Some might suggest administration of salt/s, perhaps an anti-bacterial... If they were me, mine, I'd leave off with such treatment.
The spots/breaks may take weeks to a few months to heal/disappear entirely.
They are not dangerous.
Bob Fenner>

 

Re: White/red spots on pectoral fins of cichlids       2/14/19
Thank you so much WWM! These two are always getting into tussels with one another which is why I keep a divider on hand. This is very good news to know that this is caused by physical trauma rather than a parasite and/or a bacterial infection.
-Matt
<IF bacterial, this is secondary... opportunistic from a break in the skin.
Not parasitic.
BobF>

Oscar Dying.       2/12/19
Hi,
Need some help asap. I recently added 2 pairs of Oscar in my fish tank. In starting hours they were fine but after a few hours, they went to the bottom. Hiding in the corners. After 24 hours they are like dead lying on the bed of the floor. This is the second time it happened. It happened before when I added a pair of Oscar. The same thing happens to them. I thought might be they are sick and unhealthy that way they are like this but this is happening again.
Tank Size:
450 Liter
Tank mates:
Tattoo Parrotfish. Tin Foil, Silver Dollar, African Cichlids, Dolphin Cichlids, Red Parrot, Giant Gorami.
Automatic Heater:
30’C 86″ F (The shopkeeper told me to make it up to 86'F so they can be cured. I also added 5 drops of water treatment before increasing the temp. Before that, it was on 28'C / 82'F)
Water changes on weekly basis over 30%
Canister Filter with UV 600L/Hour
Pictures:
https://ibb.co/JyT0qsb
https://ibb.co/ZGmGnWM
Please respond asap.
Thanks,
Abdul
<Hello Abdul. I'm not confident about the future here. Let's put aside for now that your aquarium really isn't big enough for all these fish (as adults, anyway). The Oscars seem to be juveniles, but very skinny. I'm not convinced they've had enough to eat over the last few weeks, and whatever other stress factors at work here, their lack of body mass will be making things worse. As a general rule, if a cichlid "goes loopy" after being introduced to a new tank, the usual explanation is environmental shock. Do check water chemistry in your tank is not too different to that of your retailer. While the 28C water temperature should be fine for Oscars, I wouldn't be keeping them a 30C. I would certainly be increasing oxygenation, and I'd be checking ammonia and nitrite are 0. Nitrate level should be below 40 mg/l, and ideally below 20 mg/l. Tankmates need to be suitable for life with Oscars. Tin Foil Barbs for example are usually fine, as are Giant Gouramis, but Dolphin Cichlids and other Malawian species require hard, alkaline water chemistry that is toxic to Oscars in the long term. "Drops of water treatment" means nothing to me. What I would be doing here is isolating these Oscars to their own dark, well-filtered aquarium, letting them settle, and then offering very tempting foods such as earthworms if they were swimming normally. If they were not swimming normally, I would simply keep the tank dark, quiet, and hope for the best. Cheers, Neale.>

Mud Turtle; shell concern        2/12/19
Hi!
<Hiya - Darrel here>
I have a 2-year-old mud turtle named Groot.
<Cool name. Yours and his>
Over the last year, his shell has started to turn black with little holes.
I am worried that it may be shell rot but I don't know. He has a little hole on the side of his shell that I have determined to be caused by shell rot but it is in a different part of his shell.
<I'm looking at the picture now and what I see is normal>
He lives in a tank with a few fish and has a basking dock (that he doesn't use a lot). We change his water every week or sometimes every other week if we are gone. He is eating fine and is swimming fine.
<Mud and Musk turtles are very shy out of water. Unlike a Slider they rarely get used to basking in company and will dive for the water at the first vibration near then. Their timidity is so severe that many people who own them will swear that they never bask... but they will do so frequently if they are able to do it in private>
1. What can I do to help him with the blackness of his shell?
<That mottled look is common - as is the algae that grows on the shell just as I see Groot seems to have.>
2. Does it look like shell rot?
<Shell rot is a feel (soft and mushy) and a smell (old socks when you scrape it and sniff the scraper)>
3. Should I be worried?
<Not from what you've told me. Make sure Groot has a basking spot that is warm and has unfiltered UV-B lighting. Feed him a high quality Koi Pellet or Repto-Min sticks (same stuff just more expensive) with an occasional earthworm (or teeny-tiny piece of beef or chicken liver) for added vitamins. Check every day that he is alert, moving around and eating well.>
Thanks,
Taylor

 

Crawfish has a white film on him?       2/12/19
My younger brother has a fairly new 10g tank (settled for a couple months or so) and added an orange crawfish. He recently had his first molt, but he now has this peculiar white/clear film developing all across his body.
Tank specs wise, everything looks good; only nitrates are a little high ~40ppm? And I add iodine weekly. Calcium may be the only issue, but he did consume his past exoskeleton. My guess is that this film is a fungus? What are my options to help him?
<There are some odd crayfish parasites out there, but my guess is that this is indeed some sort of 'aufwuchs'; i.e., rotifers, fungi, and other harmless organisms. In the short term at least, optimising water quality will be important, and I would also be providing a rich source of calcium for him to eat, such as unshelled shrimp. The exoskeleton is a mix of calcium minerals along with proteins, and if there's insufficient calcium in his diet, there's a risk the exoskeleton might become soft and prone to fungal infection. Regular water changes and brisk filtration should ensure good water quality, and yes, I'd be aiming to lower that nitrate level a bit. Make sure the food you offer him is not too high in protein -- crayfish are very much omnivores rather than carnivores. Algae-based pellets would be suitable as a staple, along with things like cooked peas or blanched lettuce. The only meaty foods offered should be "whole" rather than fillets, so that there's plenty of calcium. As mentioned, unshelled shrimp are good, but also offer things like frozen lancefish or bones from whole white fish you've used in the kitchen, such as tilapia. Smashed up crab legs, snails and mussels could be used too, so that the shell is mixed in with the meat. Cheers, Neale.>

Now: Corydoras/Betta/Frog compatibility; (was: F8 puffer care)      2/11/19
Hi sorry to bother you again I have a 10 gallon fresh water tank, currently I have one Betta, African Dwarf frog, and a green Cory catfish, I tested to see if my Betta was aggressive so i got ghost shrimp (I later feed them to my Puffer Fish) and he was fine so I added the other two, they all get along great, I wanted to add one or two more Cory's, could that make the Betta more territorial or aggressive, and it that too much in one tank?
Thank you!
<Yes, adding extra Corydoras should be fine. Bettas are not always predictable, but usually ignore dissimilar fish swimming on the substrate.
They're less tolerant of midwater and especially surface swimming species.
Ten gallons is a bit tight though, and while you might get away with 5-6 catfish, they're going to place an appreciable load on the filter, and more critically, compete for the food you're offering the frog. Cheers, Neale.>
Re: Now: Corydoras/Betta/Frog compatibility; (was: F8 puffer care)      2/11/19

I have mainly feed the Frog frozen brine shrimp and bloodworms along with the Cory and Puffer,
<Not keeping the puffer with the frog and catfish though, surely?>
Thank you so much!
<Welcome. Neale.>
Re: Now: Corydoras/Betta/Frog compatibility; (was: F8 puffer care)       2/14/19

Oh the puffer Is in a separate tank by himself but I give them the same food for most of the time blood worms and brine shrimp
<Cool. Do try and offer as broad a variety as possible (fish and seafood fillet for example) to avoid vitamin deficiencies. Mussels and prawns in particular are cause vitamin B1 deficiency due to thiaminase. Cockles and squid are better. Also include some "shelly" foods too, such as Physa and
Physella snails, unshelled shrimps, pulverised whole mussels with their shells mixed in. These will help to wear down the teeth and avoid overgrowing teeth, a real problem with most pufferfish. Cheers, Neale.>

Is a single Pomacea diffusa safe with single Clea helena - 2/11/2019     /Sara
Hello,
<Hola Jackie>
I have searched forums, the net, and your site, and have not been able to find an answer to my question.
In my planted 10 gallon there is a Betta, a Pomacea diffusa and a Physa. This evening I put in a single Clea helena(from a different tank) to deal with the MTS, ramshorn and Physa offspring.
Am I looking for trouble as far as the Apple snail is concerned?
<Yes. In fact, just for you, I found this lovely video of an assassin snail attacking and eating an apple snail, that I found on good old YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWWTwoW-d64 >
I can move the Assassin to a different, established tank if you think that would be best and use another method to control the pest snail population.
<Or maybe you could temporarily move the apple snail?>
Photo from a month ago shows the size of Apple snail-about the size of a ping pong ball, with the Physa on board.
<Clea helena are known to attack, kill, and eat snails larger than themselves. Thus, in this case, the size of the apple snail alone is unlikely to make much of a difference in terms of its likelihood of falling prey to the assassin snail.>
Thank you for your time.
<My pleasure.>
Jackie
<Cheers,
Sara L.>

Is a single Pomacea diffusa safe with single Clea helena      2/11/19
Hello,
I have searched forums, the net, and your site, and have not been able to find an answer to my question.
<Oh?>
In my planted 10 gallon there is a Betta, a Pomacea diffusa and a Physa.
This evening I put in a single Clea helena (from a different tank) to deal with the MTS, ramshorn and Physa offspring.
<Understood.>
Am I looking for trouble as far as the Apple snail is concerned?
<Should be okay, especially if other prey/leftover food is available.>
I can move the Assassin to a different, established tank if you think that would be best and use another method to control the pest snail population.
<Clea helena tends to consume small snails that it can overwhelm, rather than biting chunks out of large prey. I've certainly kept them with Tylomelania spp., and while juvenile Tylomelania were certainly eaten, the adults did fine.>
Photo from a month ago shows the size of Apple snail-about the size of a ping pong ball, with the Physa on board.
Thank you for your time.
Jackie
<I'd say it's worth a shot, but I've not tried this combination myself, so can't guarantee it. Cheers, Neale.>
Re: Is a single Pomacea diffusa safe with single Clea helena     /Neale       2/12/19

Thank you Neale. I'll keep a close eye on the tank as I don't want the Apple snail to feel threatened in his own home.
<Indeed not!>
During my search elsewhere for answers, I could only find people talking about an issue with multiple Assassins being a problem with one Apple snail, and not the situation I've created.
<Indeed; but do be aware, as Sara suggested in her message.>
Very much appreciate your input.
<Most welcome.>
Jackie
<Cheers, Neale.>

 

Help my turtle please T^T      2/8/19
Hi WWM! I'm Lisa from Malaysia...
I have concerns for my turtle, Ponyo.
<Cool name!>
First of all this is not my turtle, it belong to my sis...She put the turtle in shallow water all the time w/o basking area. From that moment I knew she killing that poor thing. I myself never pet a turtle my entire
existence. I don't know Ponyo was acted normal or being sick, but I knew something was wrong.
<Indeed.>
Ponyo not active at all. His eyes squint/closed almost all the time, either on land or water.
<Not good.>
When I took it out from water, he not walk around. I try submerged him to see did he swim well. No he's not.
<Not good either.>
He just float and not even flutter his legs. His shedding his leg, but his nail seems to be off too. Is it normal?
<No.>
He has some discoloration on his shell. For now I regularly put him outside for sunlight.
<Good!>
He also have some algae around his shell, due to be in water all the time.
<Usually harmless. But he should be able to climb onto a rock to bask and dry out.>
I try to clean it using soft toothbrush and change his water regularly using tap water. I clean his home too. Did I do the right thing?
<Probably.>
He also not eat any of his pellet. I try feed him various of greens and fruits, but no response.
<Sometimes won't eat "greens" if they have pellets. Starving them a few days can help.>
I don't know how long my sis have Ponyo ,therefore I don't know how long Ponyo being like this. I never have a turtle, any tips or additional
information much appreciate!! Thank you so much in advance and sorry for my English, hope you guys able to understand it.
<English is fine! Anyway, it is probable that your turtle has either a
bacterial infection or a dietary problem. Do start reading here, please:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/treating%20RES%20Dis%20DarrelB.htm
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/turteyedisart.htm
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/turtrespart.htm
Antibiotics, and likely a Vitamin A injection, will be the usual treatment.
<<Do also read the following, from our turtle expert Darrel. Cheers, Neale.>>
"Get him warm and dry right away
The article covers dry docking.
See that he has UV-B lighting if possible, if not 10 minutes in the sun at least 3 times a day -- not through glass which filters out the benefits of the light.
If he's not too far gone this will help him rest and recover and in a few days you may see him moving about the box or whatever he's in ... and then you can try the shallow bowl bath and then a feeding. I'd suggest tiny bits of liver (beef or chicken) which are packed full of vitamins.
D"
Re: Help my turtle please T^T       2/14/19

Thanks for the tip and help!
<Most welcome. Neale.>

Common Plec; an oldie but a goodie       2/7/19
Hi, we have a common Plec who has reached the grand age of 20 with us.
<Neato!>
He is now on his 4th tank which is a big 6 foot tank. We had a few problems when we set this tank up but all seems to be fine now but was wondering how old common Plecs live to in general.
<Yours is a good ripe age. Have heard, read of some living to be "in their twenties".>
We love our boy (maybe a girl, unsure to be honest) and want to ensure we give him the best. Are there any food suggestions for his older age or stuff we should be doing. Thanks Debbie
<Sinking veggie wafers are always a hit, as are boiled and cooled zucchini and other soft squashes. Bob Fenner>

Disappearing Malaysian Trumpet Snails - REALLY disappearing      2/7/19
Hello Crew!
I hope you can help me solve this mystery. I have four Walstad-style nano aquariums, all of which have had MTS snails introduced early on. They proliferated in all four tanks for a long time. Here's a quick run down of the tanks:
3 gallon planted tank with 1 beautiful male pea puffer, ramshorn snails, and live blackworm colony.
5 gallon planted tank with 6 moth catfish (Hara jerdoni), ramshorn snails, and assassin snails (Ramshorns were getting too much)
5 gallon planted tank with African dwarf frogs, ember tetras, ramshorn snails, and tadpole snails (great tank for ADFs, it's not the usual cube - it is longer, wider, and shallow.) This tank has a sponge filter as it is easier on the frogs.
15 gallon planted coolish tank (72-73 degrees) with trio of Jordanella floridae, a flock of pygmy corys, small group of Otocinclus, a few White Cloud minnows, and ramshorn snails.
<These all sound splendid.>
So last evening I was thinking about snails (doesn't everyone do that?) and thought it would be good to add a few MTS snails to my Opae ula tank. It was early evening and the tank lights were still on. So I went looking for some, went from tank to tank and couldn't find any. Well, I just figured they were all under the substrate.
<Indeed.>
Usually I would only see them first thing in the morning when the tank lights went on, then they would go hide.
So this morning I went looking again - still no MTS snails! What the hey??? I looked in every tank, and how could they just disappear?
<Hard to say. Might simply have not been the right conditions for them to thrive. Competition, lack of food, wrong pH; the usual complex of biotic and abiotic factors. Or they may be there, just not noticeable.>
All of my fish / frogs are healthy and thriving, the plants are all doing well, and there are tons of ramshorn snails everywhere (and tadpole snails in the frog tank). So what's going on?
<Planorbis and Physa do require less calcium and will thrive in soft, acidic water, whereas Melanoides will not.>
Some mysterious plague that only decimates Malaysian Trumpet snails?
<Not that I am aware of.>
For additional context, I do swap plants and/or plant trimmings from tank to tank as needed. And when I do water changes I just go from tank to tank with no effort to sterilize equipment between tanks. I would change this if there were any disease problems in any of the tanks, but there have not been any so far (fingers crossed). All the tanks are fed generously as per the usual Walstad methodology, and all the tanks get fed live blackworms a few times a month. They just stay in the tank until eventually all eaten.
No algae problems - indeed no visible algae at this point in any of the tanks due to the large number of plants. I have to supplement my Otocinclus with veggies to keep them healthy. And the ramshorn snails are all doing just fine.
Rather an interesting problem to have. What do you think could have caused this?
<Hard to say. The point is that you are creating viable ecosystems, and Melanoides patently do not thrive in all ecosystems, given their absence from many parts of the world. By bad luck or otherwise, you've come up with a set of conditions they don't like. Or perhaps they're there, just not on view.>
(BTW, tonight I will go on another snail hunt, just in case I missed any.)
Thanks for your help!
Joanne
<Cheers, Neale.>
Re: Disappearing Malaysian Trumpet Snails - REALLY disappearing      2/7/19

Thank you for your response! I think you hit the nail on the head with the comment about calcium and soft water.
<Ah! Good.>
I went on another evening snail hunt and managed to pull about six MTS snails (combined) from two of my FW aquariums. It was immediately evident that their shells were abnormal - a few had patches of thin/translucent areas, and the others were mostly translucent. And yet these same snails had been thriving in my tanks for a long time!
<Understood.>
Here's what I believe has happened: I live in Richmond, Virginia, and my tap water is sourced from the James River. Normal hardness parameters are generally in the moderate range. However, this past year we had record setting rainfall - and the rains came all throughout the year instead of clustering in spring and fall as usual. I believe this unusual amount of rain water entering the river caused the hardness to drop considerably. I just hadn't thought about it before. The MTS snails would probably have been ok if it were not for the presence of the other snails - as you pointed out they have lower calcium requirements than the MTS. And indeed, none of those snails have any shell abnormalities whatsoever. And of course the ramshorn snails are far more visible to me as they are out and about in the daytime as well as nighttime, while the MTS snails are primarily nocturnal.
Well, at least I managed to get those six snails for my Opae ula tank! They should have no calcium problems whatsoever in brackish water, with aragonite sand.
<Quite so; ideal conditions for Melanoides, which have a very high salt tolerance.>
Altogether an interesting problem to have, as most people have the opposite problem with being overrun by these guys! Thanks again for your input.
Joanne
<Glad to help! Neale.>

Delhezi Bichir hunger strike & hunting tank mates     /RMF  2/6/19
Hi WWM Crew,
My Delhezi Bichir was previously more than happy to eat beef heart, silver sides, and black worms, but recently has gone on a hunger strike... I was giving him the occasional treat of live saltwater crabs that I had been catching out of my saltwater tank, so maybe that spoiled him into only wanting to hunt?
<Possibly a factor... I kept, fed Bichirs years back...>
He managed to snag a couple of my Congo Tetras that didn't quite grow fast enough to stay out of "bite size" range. Ever since then, he's trying to use the beef heart as bait for the other fish. He'll literally sit with his nose practically touching it while lurking under the driftwood or Amazon Sword leaves and just waits to see if any of the other
fish are dumb enough to come snag a piece.
<Interesting>
He keeps lurking to try and catch more fish. I've tried offering market shrimp, scallops, crab meat, silver sides, beef heart, blackworms, live earthworms, and Massivore pellets, but he's snubbed them all.
<Very strange that this fish refuses live earthworms...>
He's in a 75g with 2 Angels, 6 Congo Tetras, 6 Goyder River Rainbows, 4 Boesemanni Rainbows, and 1 Turquoise Rainbow at the moment. The Bichir is around 9" right now. The Angels, 4 Goyder River Rainbows, and 1 Turquoise
Rainbow are all full grown and not at risk of being eaten, but the others were restocks after I had a problem with an Opaline Gourami killing half my tank (who's since been removed)... I got the largest I could find to replace, but no one sells Rainbows or Congo Tetras larger than 2-3"... I knew it was a risk, but this guy's been so mellow and easy to feed until recently that I was hoping it would work.
Is there any way to convince the Bichir to go back to non-live foods, or do I just need to cut my losses and pull the Congo Tetras now?
<How long has it been since you saw it eat? Does it appear thin, the stomach "caved in"?>
Maybe if I
isolated him in a spare 20g long bare bottom tank for a short time to keep him away from the tetras until he takes food again? Or would he just go back to his old tricks the moment he had fishy temptations again?
<I wouldn't worry if it's only been a week, ten days, and this fish has a good index of fitness. I'd offer it a live earthworm every two, three days and be patient at this point>
Thanks!
~Kim
<Welcome, Bob Fenner>
Delhezi Bichir hunger strike & hunting tank mates /Neale       2/7/19

Hi WWM Crew,
<Kim,>
My Delhezi Bichir was previously more than happy to eat beef heart, silver sides, and black worms, but recently has gone on a hunger strike... I was giving him the occasional treat of live saltwater crabs that I had been catching out of my saltwater tank, so maybe that spoiled him into only wanting to hunt?
<This is definitely true. Farmed Bichirs may be more than happy to take dead or pellet foods, but if they "discover" live alternatives, this can pique their interest. If starved for a while, they will go back to what
they know, but that's really only viable in a tank with other big fish. If they live with even potentially edible tankmates, they may try eating those before settling back down.>
He managed to snag a couple of my Congo Tetras that didn't quite grow fast enough to stay out of "bite size" range. Ever since then, he's trying to use the beef heart as bait for the other fish. He'll literally sit with his nose practically touching it while lurking under the driftwood or Amazon Sword leaves and just waits to see if any of the other fish are dumb enough to come snag a piece. He keeps lurking to try and catch more fish. I've tried offering market shrimp, scallops, crab meat, silver sides, beef heart, blackworms, live earthworms, and Massivore pellets, but he's snubbed them all.
<It isn't unusual for predators to stop feeding for a while. Hunger makes the best sauce of course!>
He's in a 75g with 2 Angels, 6 Congo Tetras, 6 Goyder River Rainbows, 4 Boesemanni Rainbows, and 1 Turquoise Rainbow at the moment. The Bichir is around 9" right now. The Angels, 4 Goyder River Rainbows, and 1 Turquoise Rainbow are all full grown and not at risk of being eaten, but the others
were restocks after I had a problem with an Opaline Gourami killing half my tank (who's since been removed)... I got the largest I could find to replace, but no one sells Rainbows or Congo Tetras larger than 2-3"... I knew it was a risk, but this guy's been so mellow and easy to feed until recently that I was hoping it would work.
<Delhezi Bichirs can be good tankmates, and generally ignore fish too large to eat. I'd expect adult Congo Tetras to be fine, having myself kept these with Polypterus palmas for example, and it's a very similar species. But as you say, anything the size of, say, a Platy will definitely be at risk.>
Is there any way to convince the Bichir to go back to non-live foods,
<Time; lack of food; hunger. You could also try offering half-way house foods, such as white fish or prawn fillet wobbled in front of his snout on the end of forceps or cocktail sticks. Bichirs have terrible eyesight, but a good sense of smell, so should fall for this trick if they aren't spooked.>
or do I just need to cut my losses and pull the Congo Tetras now?
<Could be a good move.>
Maybe if I isolated him in a spare 20g long bare bottom tank for a short time to keep him away from the tetras until he takes food again? Or would he just go back to his old tricks the moment he had fishy temptations again?
<Impossible to say for sure. I would not trust him with small teammates at all.>
Thanks!
~Kim
<Cheers, Neale.>

Tiny white or off-white organisms in shower       2/5/19
Coming from the lake house (fresh water lake) shower drain were these tiny white to off-white larvae or worms. Very small but moving so living organism in my book. It was almost like wiggling rice and on s ok me the end was more like a triangle formation (head). My first impression was flat worms, but they were so small I thought larvae too.
<Mmm; white, triangular headed... sounds like Roundworms/Nematodes... but moving quickly? More like insect larvae>
So sorry I didn't snap a pic. Any suggestions or hurry do something red flags with this information that y'all think would be helpful in identifying?
<A close up photo please; not likely problematical for human touch.>
I read a lot on line. They did not have a brown or black head. These were almost maggot like. But the maggots I've seen are more dense, these looked really squishy and almost like tiny tiny moving blobs of mucus. But I did see a few with the triangle-ish end (head). The others just looked like mushy wiggly
rice, just not maggots to me......
Any response us appreciated.
Thank you,
Jennifer
<Do see here: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/AqInsect%20IDF.htm
and the linked files above. Bob Fenner>

Re: Nerite snails in isolation tank       2/14/19
Thanks!
<Most welcome. Neale.>

 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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