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FAQs on Glass Aquarium Repair, Chips/Cracks 11

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Related FAQs: Chips/Cracks 1, Chips/Cracks 2, Chips/Cracks 3, Chips/Cracks 4, Chips/Cracks 5, Chips/Cracks 6, Chips/Cracks 7, Chips/Cracks 8, Chips/Cracks 9, Chips/Cracks 10, & Glass Aquarium Repair 1, Glass Aquarium Repair 2, G lass Aquarium Repair 3, Glass Aquarium Repair 4, Glass Aquarium Repair 5,  & FAQs on Repairing Glass Tank: Scratches/Blemishes, Cross-Braces, Leaks, Whole Panes, Tools: Cutting Glass, Silicone, Moulding/Frames; Techniques; Olde Tank (Slate Bottom, Metal Frame, Pecora...) Repairs, Troubleshooting/Repairs, & Acrylic Aquarium RepairUsed Aquarium Gear

Glass Aquarium Chip     4/3/17
<Can't open your too-large (8.6 meg file) here at the airport in Roatan
Wyatt... Will do so manana in EEUU. B>
Glass Aquarium Chip     4/3/17

Hello thank you for the support and valuable information over the years. I am setting up an approximately 92 rimless glass aquarium with 1/2" low iron glass. After getting this aquarium in place I discovered the chip
pictured.
The aquarium is new. Any opinions and concerns would be greatly appreciated.
<The size, shape of this chip doesn't worry me (I'd use this tank); but I might tape over the spot to prevent cutting hands, fingers. Bob Fenner>
Re: Glass Aquarium Chip     4/3/17

No problem I wanted to leave them decent resolution so you can zoom in as needed. Here is a third party hosted link if all else fails
http://imgur.com/a/6qjQq
Wyatt
<Thanks. BobF>

Re: Glass Aquarium Chip     4/3/17
Thank you again and take care!
Wyatt
<Ahh, will do. BobF>

The best of times the worst of times. Little glass chip and stand leveling input to share     2/28/17
Hi WWM Crew,
<Eddie>
"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times." Sorry to get all "literary" with you, but it seemed to describe accurately my dilemma. It was the best of times in that, finally, after four and a half years without a fish tank, I am ready to get wet again.
<Yay!>
The stand was built, the plumbing and sump were worked out in the basement, and this past Saturday a friend and I moved the stand and tank into the den. I worked for a couple of evenings on and off getting it perfectly level. I even learned a couple of neat tricks that I will share below.
The tank is now level and ready to be filled beyond the 2 3/4" that I have already put in it to level it.
It was the worst of times in that last evening, while I was finishing up the leveling, I noticed a chip in the front left corner of the tank (see picture).
<I see this>
This tank is a 75 gallon with the overflow offset in the middle of the left half of the rear of the tank (I think it's an AGA). I got it slightly used four years ago, and it has been sitting in my basement since then.
When I first got it in the basement, I went over it with a fine tooth comb and did not see this chip. I'm sure I would have if it had had it then. It must have happened some time since then. I have also looked over it several more times since then, but not as carefully. We have been very careful moving it around, and we didn't bump it into anything any time we
moved it.
<This is a small "impact" chip, scalloped... IF one had to have one, the better kind>

I've had it filled several times--right after I bought it, to check the stand, and to check the plumbing/sump. Each time it was filled for several days (once for a week). The last two fillings were recent (the plumbing check was last month). I'm virtually certain the chip was there then. I know we didn't bump it into anything carrying it into the house, and nothing has been bumped into it since then either. In fact, nothing has been bumped into it at any time (that I know of). The source of the chip is a mystery.
I have looked over the chip FAQs several times over the years (out of concern for other tanks for potential sumps/QT's), and looking at the information there, it is not the nature of the chip that concerns me. It is a "sea shell" chip with no cracks that is about 1/8" in diameter. It is too shallow to measure the depth effectively. I tried to take a side-view
picture and you couldn't even see it. What concerns me is where it is. It is about 2 1/2" to 2 3/4" from the bottom of the tank (measured from the inside by the depth of the water). It is toward the outside of the glass
panel though (not on the side with the silicon). For this reason, I decided to seek "professional help" in assessing it.
<I'm not overly concerned re the size, placement>
I don't mind admitting that it makes me nervous. My last marine aquarium was a 55 gallon that the bottom panel burst mysteriously in the night.
Actually it wasn't so mysterious because the stand top was not planar and I don't think the tank was completely level either (though it was hard to tell after the fact).
<Yikes>
THIS stand is planar with one tiny gap (less than 1/32") on one corner. I have used 3/4" Styrofoam underneath the tank to solve that problem. The tank is perfectly level now (with less than three inches of water) and I intend to keep checking it as I fill it--if I get to fill it, which is what I'm hoping that your professional eyes can tell me. I think I know the answer, but is this tank safe to use? Or do I need to save my pennies for another one?
<I would use it>
I also wanted to share a couple of tips that I learned while leveling the tank. It may be old information to many, but I don't recall reading them anywhere on WWM. I have read about putting a couple of inches of water in the tank and measuring the depth to determine whether it is level. What I discovered is that it is easier to use a yard stick than a tape measure.
Also, I discovered if I put a small piece of painter's tape on the yard stick to mark where the water depth was when I measured the first corner that it made it a lot easier to determine whether the other measurements were the same or not. It was either right at the tape mark or above or below it. I only taped one side of the markings so I could tell how much
from the other side. Also I discovered that it helped to draw a rectangle representing the tank from above and write at each corner and in the front and back middle the depth so I could look at all the measurements at the same time and decide where the shims needed to go. Hope someone finds this helpful.
<Thank you for sharing>
As always I thank you SO MUCH for making this service available. I have learned so much over the years from the site and the few email inquiries I have made.
Thank you,
Eddie
<Welcome. Bob Fenner>

Questions about Sumps and glass tank seams and chips      10/11/16
Dear WWM Crew,
<Hit it Eddie>
It’s me again, and I have a lot more questions to ask you. The test fill went great. The tank and the stand did fine. I’m still working on the siding for the stand, so in the meantime, I’m trying to finalize my filtration plans. The plan all along has been to have a sump and a refugium/DSB, but I had to wait until the stand was built so I could know exactly how much room I would have.
<I see>
The 75 gallon tank has the typical overflow with the 1” drain and ¾” return.
<Ugh; a one-inch through-put is too small... DO plan on doing most all your water (re)circulation inside the main tank... with submersible pumps, powerheads...>
However, I intend to use both holes for drains and run the return over the back of the tank.
<Mmm; well, the 3/4 inch won't do much good. See HERE:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/SystemPIX/PlumbingPix/Oneinchart.htm
The plan is for the drains to empty into the skimmer chamber of the sump.
<Mmm... better later... in a chamber that has about constant level>

The skimmer is an Aqua C EV-180. Then there will be the typical baffles to the other chamber of the sump that will have the return pump. Also in this chamber will be a power head that will pump water to the DSB/Refugium, and the water will then gravity feed from there back to the return pump chamber of the sump. That’s the general plan. Now to the specifics and the questions . . .
I have had a difficult time finding two containers that will fit together in the stand to use for the sump and the DSB/Refugium. I know I can use either smaller tanks or plastic storage containers. For cost reasons the plan was to use storage containers (trying to do this on a budget), but I can’t seem to find the right size.
<Mmm; even online? Container Store, Amazon...?>
Then, a couple of weeks ago, I went by a LFS in a nearby city (hour and a half away) that was going out of business. They had a stack of 20 gallon glass display tanks that they were selling for $5 each. They were each drilled with a 1” bulkhead about ¾ of the way up the back, and were painted blue on all three sides. Because they were so inexpensive, I picked one up, thinking it might work really well for the DSB/Refugium—since it was already drilled I thought I could use this throughput for the gravity feed back to the sump. I took it home and put it in the stand and measured the remaining space for the sump.
Then I made a vain search for a plastic container that would fit with the 20 gallon tank, but couldn’t find one. That left me limited to using a 10 gallon aquarium for the sump.
<Too small; I'd use the 20 for the sump, the ten for the 'fuge>

(The space is too small for a 20 Gallon. Is there a common 15 gallon size? I’ve never seen one.)
<Oh yes; 24" X 12" X 12" if memory serves>
I happened to have an old 10 gallon that might work (see below), and if it doesn’t they are not expensive. So the plan is now to put baffles in the 10 gallon dividing it into two chambers. The water drains into the skimmer chamber and flows through the baffles to the return chamber. In the return chamber are two pumps—the Mag 7 pump
<https://www.amazon.com/Danner-Mag-Drive-Supreme-Water-Pump/dp/B0002564QC
May well overdrive your over-flows.... Again... I would NOT drive this much water through.... IF one of the too-puny overflows becomes occluded... water on the floor>
which will return the water to the display, and a power head which will pump water to the 20 gallon DSB/refugium. From there the water will gravity feed to the return chamber through the 1” drain. To make this work I will have to build a platform to elevate the 20 gallon tank several inches, but I have plenty of vertical room in the stand.
So, now here are the issues/questions:
1. I am test filling the 20 gallon tank, and there are some bubbles in the seams (see pictures
—these are from the two front corners. The back corners also have bubbles, but not quite as many). I have no idea how old the tank is or how long it was used as a sales tank by the LFS. In my purpose it will not be full at any time—only up to the drain, so about ¾ full—but it will contain a 5” DSB and perhaps some live rock. In your estimation is it safe to use for this purpose? I can continue to test fill for as long as necessary. Also, in test filling it I have filled it over the bulkhead (by turning the elbow fittings up I have filled it a couple of inches higher than it will be in normal use). So it has a couple of inches more water in it now than it will have normally.
<I wouldn't be concerned w/ these air bubbles>
2. If the 20 gallon tank is safe to use, what GPH should I look for in the power head to feed the water to it?
<Small; as in 3-4 turns per hour>
3. In regard to the idea to use a 10 gallon tank for the sump, will this be large enough to handle the amount of flow and excess water in a power loss?
<Not likely NO. For SURE you want to "test" here... FILL the tanks up, turn on the pump/s and then turn them off... see how much water "runs down hill", MARK the sump as to MAXIMUM depth (with a permanent marker, tape) and DO NOT fill it any more than this>

I know the 1/3 display tank size rule for sumps, but I am counting the 20 gallon DSB/Refugium too, so that puts me at 30 Gallons.
<Mate; ALL the water above the overflow of the main tank PLUS refugium will have to be accommodated in the SUMP. USE the twenty or keep looking. You've configured a disaster in the making here>
Also, I am going to put a valve on the return line so that I can throttle back the return pump if necessary.
<Not a good idea really. Just get/use the size (pressure, flow) pump that will be on full all the time>
Most circulation will be accomplished through circulation power heads in the display.
<Ah, good>
4. If a 10 gallon tank will work, how much minimum space needs to be between the baffles?
<About... Oh, see this below. Yes to gaps that allow getting a siphon, cleaning tools into>
I did a WWM search and found somewhere that someone put 1.5” to 2” between baffles. To fit the skimmer in the sump I need less than 3” between the baffles, but the EV-180 can be put outside the sump if necessary. I have space behind the sump, just not lengthwise.
<I'd place this IN the sump for sure>
5. Finally, the 10 gallon tank I have has a small chip in the glass (see picture). It is a seashell shape with no cracks, but it is at the very bottom of front panel on the edge. Under normal operation, it will be half-full or so. Is it safe to use for this purpose, or should I pick up another 10 gallon tank?
<I'd at least fill in the chipped area with Silastic. Won't help strength-wise, but will save someone from a nasty cut>
Thank you SO MUCH for continually answering my questions. I don’t want to be a pest, but I don’t really have many other people to ask for advice.
<We're happy to assist your efforts>
I live in a small South Alabama town, and I know of no one else here who is into saltwater aquaria.
<Perhaps a posting on CraigsList? Starting a "Meet Up" group in your area....? Easy, fun to do>
I have a friend who owns a LFS, but he is almost 2 hours away. I trust your judgment. I have CMA and have read it twice. I read WWM FAQs constantly. Yet often my questions are so specific I feel I need to consult the experts. I just hope that it’s not TOO often.
Thanks again,
Eddie
<Welcome. Bob Fenner>

Re: Questions about Sumps and glass tank seams and chips      10/12/16
Hi Bob,
<Hey Ed>
Thank you so much for your answers. I’ve never done a drilled tank with a sump before so I have no practical experience at all—just what I’ve read or seen looking under display tanks at LFS’s.
<Better, best to read... than trial and many errors>
So, I’m kind of flying blind—especially when it comes to what happens when the power goes out. As the expression goes, that’s why I asked. You said some things I thought you would say, and some things I didn’t expect. Either way I’m grateful, but I also have some confusion, some clarifications, and some more questions.
<Hotay!>
First of all, I’m abandoning the 10 gallon sump idea. I don’t want to cut it too close, which is why I asked in the first place. It seemed too small to me.
<Tis>
However, one thing that you said that confused me is that the sump has to hold all the water above the overflow of the main tank PLUS the refugium.
<It does mate... think... what happens when the power goes out, or the main/sump pump stops>
The 20 gallon tank I was thinking of using as the DSB/refugium has a one inch drain in the side near the top (a couple of inches down). I hadn’t anticipated a lot of back flow from it because if the power head supplying it was three or four turns per hour (60 to 80 gallons per hour in this case), wouldn’t that keep the water level pretty close to the level of the drain, and thus not add much to the sump?
<.... you can calculate this for all surface areas... or just try it in real time>
I have tried to find plastic containers online, but the problem is the listed dimensions on the website for them are for the outside rim, not the area of the bottom (usually a good bit smaller). Whether I’m looking for a sump or a refugium I need to know the area of the bottom so that I can know whether I’ll have room for my pumps and skimmer (in the case of the sump) and so that I can have as large of a DSB as I can (in the case of the refugium). I want to be able to see the container first hand so that I can put a tape measure to it and know what I’m dealing with.
<Meh! Life's a series of compromises... the slope isn't all that great on such containers. Set the ten sideways on top of the right of the twenty...>
You suggested using the 20 gallon as the sump. The problem that I see with this is the 1” drain hole. This drain hole will limit the amount of water it can hold as a sump, unless I plug it. How would I go about plugging it?
<Silicone and a bit of plastic sheet or glass>
I have another option for the sump that I didn’t mention before. I have an old acrylic wet/dry that is 23.5” X 10” X16” (16 gallons or so). Would it be big enough to be a sump?
<Maybe... if very slow flow>
If I use this W/D, I can’t use the 20 Gallon for the DSB/refugium too, because it is a half inch too long (Don’t you just hate it when that happens!). If I go with this option, I’ll probably try to find the biggest plastic container that I can fit into the space and use it for the DSB/refugium. Regarding that possible set up:
1. Option 1 would be drilling the W/D and gravity feeding into the DSB/refugium and then putting the return pump in the DSB/refugium container (basically a straight line—W/D with Skimmer, gravity feeding into DSB/refugium container, flowing through it to the return pump—walled off with baffles or similar). That wouldn’t leave a lot of space for the DSB.
2. Option 2 would be drilling the plastic container and going with a power head in the sump to pump water into the DSB/refugium and then gravity feeding it back into the sump. Question/concern with this option is can you drill a plastic container and use a bulkhead fitting?
<Most, yes. NEED two gaskets, Silastic and tightening the nut just so>
The slanted sides and softer material would seem to make this difficult. I prefer option 2, but I wasn’t sure about putting a bulkhead in a plastic container.
<Have done so many times>
I’m also confused in regard to what you said about the Mag 7 pump. Reason being, when I was considering buying the used pump I emailed you with some questions about it, and you OK’d me using it in the way I described. Here is the text of that email (I highlighted the pertinent part).
-------- Original Message --------
From: "Eddie
Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2015 5:45 PM
To: crew@WetWebMedia.com
Subject: Re: Pondmaster Mag Drive Pump

Hi Bob,
<Ed>
Thank you for your answer. I picked up some good stainless screws for the pump, but now I have another question about it. In the last email I told you that the pump was a Pondmaster Mag Drive 700. I wasn't 100% certain of that since the label on the side was missing. The guy told me it was a Mag 7, but I wanted to be sure. So I did a couple of tests, and now I'm confused. In the first test I used a two foot section of 3/4" (ID) PVC with an elbow and a 6 inch section of Loc-line at the top. With this set up I filled a 5 gallon bucket in about 40 seconds.
<Restriction>
By my calculations this is around 450 GPH. I'm a little new to figuring out head pressure, but after reading a lot of plumbing FAQ's on WWM I think I had around 3 feet of head on this set up. For the second test I used a five foot section of 3/4" (ID) PVC with an elbow at the top (no loc-line this time). With this set up I filled up a 5 gallon bucket in about 51 seconds. By my calculations this is around 350 GPH. I think this set up had about 6 feet of head pressure. I
looked up the head/GPH chart for the Pondmaster series on the internet. At 3 feet of head it a Pondmaster 700 should get 500 GPH, but I only got 450 GPH.
<Aye ya; you're a sharp one... this is close>
At 6 feet of head pressure, it should have get 400, but I got only 350 GPH. Yet, it cannot be a Pondmaster 500. They are the same physical size (according to the specs I looked up), but at 3 feet of head a 500 gets about 375, and at 6 feet of head it gets about 175 GPH. It's got to be a 700.
So, here are my questions . . .
1. Am I figuring the head pressure right?
<Apparently so>
2. Is it just not running at optimum level? Could this be because of age?
(It's used, but I'm not sure for how long)
<Possibly...>
I got this pump to use with my Aqua C EV-180. If it's not putting out a full 700 GPH though, I don't want to use it for that. I might instead use it for my return pump. Let me give you a few details on my planned set up in that regard. I have a 75 gallon tank (factory drilled with 1" drain & 3/4" return & overflow). I'm not going to drill additional holes. After a
lot of research of WWM plumbing FAQ's, I had decided to use both of these holes for drains and limit my flow to between 300 and 350 GPH (and make up for the rest of what I need through power heads). I haven't figured out all
the plumbing details yet, because I'm still in the planning stages and haven't gotten my stand finished yet, but I know I'll have about 5 to 5 1/2 feet of vertical distance from the sump to the top of the tank for the (over the side) return. I'll have a little bit more head than that because I'll have to move to a little the side to get out from under the tank to go over
the side for the return. I'm not sure how much additional head that will be. If I use this pump, I know that at 6 feet of head it does around 350 GPH. If I use much more than 6 feet of head through my eventual plumbing set up, then it will (likely) get down to or below 300 GPH. Would that be enough flow through a sump/refugium combo?
<Yes; assuredly>
<< More than enough>>
Would I be better off with a more powerful pump (say a new Mag 7) and use a valve to throttle it down if need be?
<I'd stick with/use what you have>
<<Yes>>
I'm not trying to put the cart before the horse. I'm trying to figure out if I want the pump or not. The guy gave it to me to test, but I haven't paid for it yet. I can give it back to him. I'd like to use it, because it means considerable savings over new one, but if I can't use it for the skimmer or the return, then I might as well give it back to him.
Sorry about the length of this email. Thanks so much for all you do for us
in this hobby.
Eddie
<You're fine w/ this pump. Bob Fenner>
I had read the article on the 1” drain before (and all the FAQs)—after I bought the tank, of course—and that’s why I had decided to use the return hole as an additional drain and make sure that I had around 300 GPH after figuring out the head pressure. I’m going to have a ball valve above the return pump anyway (to make it easier to remove it if necessary) and I will test the flow before filling the aquarium. IF I am too much over 300 then I will throttle it down a little bit. Is that plan feasible, because I really don’t want to buy another pump at this point?
<<Depends on the sump/.... you do NOT want the transit volume to OVERFLOW the sump>>
So, counting the text of the previous email pasted in, this may be the longest email I have ever sent WWM. Is there a length record?
<<Oh, you're WAAAAY short of this>>
Thanks so much for your help, and for clearing up all my confusion. Y’all are wonderful!
Thanks so much,
Eddie
<Do you understand here Eddie? BobF>
Re: Questions about Sumps and glass tank seams and chips      10/12/16

Hi Bob,
<Eddie>
I have come to understanding (I think) thanks to your patient help. I guess I’ll never REALLY understand until I see it “in action”, but I’m a lot closer than I was.
<Ah good>
The more water you push with the pump (the more GPH), the more water you will have above the level of the drain (and standpipe), and all that’s got to go somewhere if the pump stops working (power outage),
<Yes!>
so you need a big enough sump to catch it all (or to use a much smaller pump or bigger drain). And having a longer return line (which lowers the GPH due to the head pressure) ALSO means more water in those lines that will back flow.
<Correct>
So, based on that realization here are the options going forward:
1. Plug and use the 20 gallon tank for the sump. Then I will find as large of a plastic container as I can for the DSB/refugium and put a drain in it & feed it with a powerhead as before.
Would this be a large enough sump if I keep my flow near 300 GPH?
<Mmm; maybe... again, have to actually try out...>
2. Try to find an even bigger tank or container to use as an “all-in-one” sump/DSB/Refugium. It’s hard to find a plastic container that is long enough and still narrow enough, but if I can find a 29 or 30 gallon tank for a reasonable price, then I will get it and divide it up into chambers. I would lose the advantage of the completely separate refugium this way, but I would gain a good bit of extra space to “catch” the falling water. Would this be a better option than #1?
<IF the sump, fuge can't be easily fit in the stand as one piece, better to use two>
If I go with option 2, I can still plug and use the 20 gallon as a quarantine tank—so it won’t be a wasted purchase. To plug the hole should the glass/plastic go on the inside or outside (I would think inside)? How much bigger than the hole should it be?
<The inside; about twice the size of the hole>
Thanks for being so patient with me (and for correcting me again if I still don’t understand.
<Clarity is pleasurable for all of us. Cheers, BobF>
Eddie
Re: Questions about Sumps and glass tank seams and chips       10/13/16

Hi Bob,
I still have one little bit of confusion. Could you please clarify what you mean in your answer regarding option two: “IF the sump, fuge can't be easily fit in the stand as one piece, better to use two.”
<Fit one (the larger) in the stand first, the other (smaller) on top of the first>
Thanks,
Eddie
Re: Questions about Sumps and glass tank seams and chips       10/13/16

By building a shelf for the smaller one to sit on or by putting it right on top of the other one? It could hold the weight of the sand and the water?
<It should be; yes>
My stand’s front/center 2x4 is removable.
<Ahh! Great>
I can get a container or aquarium in there that is up to 39” X 16” or even longer if it is less than 12” wide. So if I can fit a 29 or 30 gallon tank in there, it would be better to go with one?
<The bigger the better. T'were it me/mine, I'd be making the sump... from glass/Silastic or acrylic. Not hard to do; and w/ a bit of shopping, not expensive. B> 

Chip on corner of 120 gallon      9/16/16
Hello,
<Brandon>
I was wondering if I could get some input as to whether I should be concerned about a chip on my 120 gallon tank on the corner. I have attached a few pictures to review. I do not want to set this tank up if there is a chance this tank could leak or explode.
Thank you very much for your assistance
<Due to the size/shape... placement of this chip... that it extends into both plates; I would either only at most half full it for some use (amphibious animals... Mangrove biotope?...) OR Silicone strips (two inch, quarter inch plate will do it) on both edges... and turn the corner to a wall or such to hide the blem. This repair is gone over and over on WWM,
but do write back if my statements are not clear, complete. Bob Fenner>


Crack in glass 1 month old saltwater tank     6/11/16
A crack is starting at the top of a 125 gallon saltwater tank. You can feel the crack on the outside if the glass but not yet on the inside.
<Mmm;;; it will be... with just a bit of a jarring>
It is full and has five large fish, live rock and some coral. I have had the clown trigger and the red tooth trigger for over 12 years....second tank. This tank is just one month old.
<Ughh! Bunk>
I cannot get a new tank to me for at least a week.
Is there anything I can put on the crack to stop it until I can get a new tank?
<Mmm; that I would do? Maybe silicone a flat piece of glass or plastic over the cracked area... Lower the water level as much as you can... have clean, soap/detergent containers on hand in case it gives>
Pam Minnick
<Bob Fenner>

Mysterious glass "issue"     2/17/16
Good morning, Bob,
<Jer>
I hope everything is well with everyone in WWM land! I write seeking an opinion more experienced, educated than mine. I apologize in advance for the long winded question, I just want you to have as much info as possible to provide the best answer. I first wrote back in 2010 as I was setting this tank up. It’s a 75 gallon with starphire front and sides made by Glasscages. They drilled the holes in the wrong locations and the silicone job was a mess but despite all the horror stories I read (after I paid) the tank has been fine up until now. I filled it and performed different tests on gear/temps for a few months. Eventually, I ended up letting it go dry and the water mostly evaporated. Around 2013ish I cleaned everything out
and refilled. This time I ran saltwater through the system. I played with a few things to eliminate microbubbles, did a few tests with the lights to gauge temperature fluctuations, etc. After a few months of this, I then let the water evaporate again, although with saltwater, this time the “sludge” was left on the bottom and the sides. Quite the slippery buildup. Fast forward a couple years to last month. I am finally ready to get my live rock shipped (pending your reply) so I started cleaning everything up….AGAIN! For a couple of days I filled the display with 6-8” of very hot water,
<Mmm; I would NOT do this. Too much chance of damaging the glass, seals
>
wiped, siphoned and repeated. It was during this time that I noticed the “issue” in the front pane. Granted, there is a .01%
chance this was there from the beginning, but highly unlikely as I would have noticed it for sure. It appears to be a chip (?)
<I see this; on magnification the "chip" appears serrated... can you feel this bit? Is it hard (like glass) or soft (like Silicone)?>
at the very bottom of the front pane, where the left side and it meet. Whatever it is, it’s fully in the glass and can’t be felt.
<Oh! A chip...?>

Then, for lack of a better description, it looks like an “ant tunnel” going to the right in an upward direction. This “ant tunnel” is about 2” or so in length and is visible in the photos. Other than one spot about 1mm that I think I can feel texture while scrapping with my fingernail, this tunnel cannot be felt from either side of the front pane either. Photo “3033” shows the side of the front pane and I have edited with a black line. The “chip” is right below this black line. As seen in the bottom left corner of the full tank shot in photo “174201” I have marked the “tunnel” with a crayon and filled the tank with water to see if it got bigger/worse I hope I resized the images to an acceptable size for WWM email.
<Yes; thanks>
If they are too big or small, I can resend. It has been about a week since I marked the tunnel and it hasn’t moved. I am going to put the powerheads in the tank tonight, along with turning on the return pump, to see if movement or any extra pressure caused by such, makes the issue any worse. With it being so low on the tank, if it does malfunction it will be a total loss. So I definitely wanted to get your expert opinion before I buy $700 worth of live rock and put it in there. I wasn’t sure if being empty with temperature fluctuations in the room could’ve exaggerated a blemish that I didn’t see originally or something else could be the cause.
<Must be original... an unusual internal break in the glass>
Just at a loss really as to what could’ve happened. In your opinion, should I scrap this tank and start over?
<Mmm: I would likely use the tank... as you state, it has been service-able till now... the seams look okay, the frame...>
Proceed with rock?
<Yes>
Find a different addiction haha?
<Nah>
It goes without saying, but it would be heartbreaking to come this far and be so ready, only to have to start over. As always, your opinion is very strongly appreciated. The vast wealth of knowledge I have obtained through WWM and your books is truly invaluable. Thank you sir!! I look forward to your reply.
Best regards,
Jeremiah G.
<And you; Bob Fenner>


Tank Crack       8/31/15
I just bought a used tank and found a crack in it. The tank is over 200 gallons and I was wondering what problems this would cause.
<Could fail catastrophically. Do NOT fill this tank>

The tank is 30" high and this crack is about a foot from the top of the tank. I went through all of the crack FAQ's and I still wasn't sure.
Any help would be much appreciated. Picture attached.
Thank you.
Jim
<I'd be trying the strips of glass (1/4" will do, three, four inches wide) along both sides of the chipped corner here... siliconed, meeting/overlapping outside. Bob Fenner>

re: Tank Crack       8/31/15
Oh, one more question. Do I have to remove the molding around the top and bottom or can I place the strips of glass top to bottom between the molding?
<Were it me/mine, I'd leave the molding in place, do the latter. BobF>
Thank you again
re: Tank Crack       8/31/15

Wow, quick response. Thank you so much. I will definitely do that.
<Ah, good. BobF>

Chip in my new 140 gal talk        7/4/15
Thanks for having a website that address these types of issues.
<Welcome>
I recently purchased a 140 gal aquarium and transported it to my home 200 miles away (It was the exact tank that I was looking for.) The tank has polished and beveled edges. After unpacking the Aquarium I noticed that it had a glob of silicon (about the size of a dime) on one edge about 12 to 15 inches from the bottom.
<Trouble>

When I scrapped the silicon away with my razor blade a chip about the size of my finger nail came up (very cleanly with no rough glass edges) The chip fits back in the space almost perfectly (gluing back would be ease).
Attached are a few pictures of the damaged area.
<Nice pix>
It appears that I won't be able return the tank. (a) Do you think I'm over concerned about the chip?
<I am too>
(b) Could this cause a complete tank failure after tank is filled?
<Possibly; if not then, potentially in time>
(c) Should I just get rid of the tank (Substantial loss) (d) Any other suggestion?
<You could either commit this tank to other use, filling at most about half way... Or do the "strip" glass appending gone over on WWM. The chip here is just too deep, large and badly placed to allow me to be comfortable.
Siliconing a three inch, quarter inch/triple strength plate of glass over the exposed height on the side... will likely be a lifetime repair... and not noticeable if the tank is placed with its back along a wall>
I hoped that I would be finishing the thank set-up over the 4th of July weekend. Not going to happen.
Thanks in advance for you assistance and speedy response.
<Again, welcome. Bob Fenner>

re: Chip in my new 140 gal talk      7/5/15
Sad News.
<Yes... but the usual spiels re ding dang reality!>
Thanks for you professional opinion.
<Welcome>
I suspected that would be the answer.
Have a great day. And thanks for being there.
Al Thomas
<Very glad to assist you. BobF>

Chip at the edge of braces       3/6/15
Hi,
<Taq>
I thank you guys in advance for advice. I recently got a new aquarium, but failed to notice a chip before setting up, as seen in pictures. I believe it is not dangerous (since similar sized chips were dismissed in previous FAQ posts), due to its position at the top and the fact that it doesn't cut right through the glass.
<Agreed>
However being right at the edge of the corner braces makes me wonder if the pressure would cause the crack to propagate?
<Don't think so>
Should I be concerned? Did not seem to find a similar problem in my searches.
Thanks,
Taqi
<I'd just fill in the gap w/ Silastic to prevent cuts and not worry. Bob Fenner>

Re: Chip at the edge of braces   3/7/15
Thanks for the confirmation! Your work is awesome.
<Certainly welcome. BobF.>

Urgent, tank chip       3/5/15
hey Bob,
I took my 60 cube (24x24x24) down to clean it out and reset it up in my room. When my brother and I placed it down on the ground, the corner hit, and an 1/8 by 1/8 inch piece of glass chipped out.
Upon inspection, it is just in the front glass pane, almost like a bevel.
It is in corner of tank, with a mound of silicone inside the tank over it.
It does not come close to the joint, it's just in one window pane.
<I see this>
I filled it with water last night, and there were 0 leaks. Being the glass is clear, you can see there are no fissures, cracks, spider webs etc. it basically looks as if someone too a bevel, and removed an 1/8 piece of the glass, away from the joint.
I have read if it holds water your good, others have said any chip, scratch or crack makes the tank useless.
Would really like your input.
I attached a photo. In the photo, you can see there is plenty of pane left before it joins the next pane, or the joint.
<This looks like a "lucky" break; not likely to spread... I would use this tank; but fill in the missing piece with Silicone; to prevent fingers getting cut. Bob Fenner>

Re: Urgent, tank chip       3/5/15
Bob,
Great news glad to hear it. I called the store I bought it from, and he said throw it into dumpster. This is without even looking at it, and went on to say a chip compromises the glass, and regardless of size of chip, location, etc, you can't use it.
<?>

However, he is not an engineer, just an lfs owner who would love nothing more than for me to buy another tank.
You say a lucky break..where do you draw the line from "unlucky" to luck"?
<Whether it can or needs to be repaired, or tossed>

Meaning if that chip was on the seam, or deeper, is that generally where it becomes risky.
Thanks again, and thanks in advance

question 2 chips on fish tank?      2/15/15
I found this on the right side of the 180 fish tank while i was cleaning
out the old silicone. I'm not sure if the chip was there before or not, it
was under the silicone. The tank was running fine before i moved it, maybe
it was caused during the move?
<Very common>
what should i do or will it be fine if it
can hold water for 48 hrs?
<Need to know where (how high up) this chip is... Have you read here:
http://wetwebmedia.com/marine/maintenance/maintindex.htm
Scroll down to the Aquarium Repairs tray; READ re Chips/Cracks>
thanks,
-Henry
<Bob Fenner>

Re: question 2 chips on fish tank?
<You've exceeded our file size limit by an order of magnitude>
Thanks for the help, i really appreciate it. The chip is on the very bottom middle edge of the fish tank.
<Bad placement>
its around in the middle area on the right glass panel of the fish tank I also noticed from top view of the chip there is a possible scratch or crack? I also took some photos with a bright light inside the glass if that helps. The glass is 1/2 inch thick.
thanks!
-Henry
<Keep reading. I wouldn't use this tank as an aquarium as is. BobF>

Chipped Corner       1/30/15
Hi guys!
<Phil>
I would like you opinion about this chip on a used 140 Gal aquarium. I noticed the shell shaped chip on a back corner once it was delivered to my home :(
Fortunately its not very deep and doesn’t appear to have any starter cracks radiating anywhere inside of it. Is there a such thing as a clean chip?
<Cleaner... and less>

The chip is 1” wide, 2” tall, and the center sits about 7” from the top of the aquarium on a 29” tall panel.
It doesn’t go wider than the silicon seam if you look at it straight on.
The depth of the chip at its deepest near the corner is about 1/8” or tip of a finger, the glass is 1/2” thick.
<Aye ya; this chip is too large, deep to use the tank as it is filling it all the way>
I was wondering if you can tell from these pics if I should do anything to reinforce it as I’ve seen you recommend for other chips of similar style.
<Yes... I would apply three or four inch strips of quarter or 3/8" glass along both edges of the corner where the chip is... Siliconing them along the faces vertically>
Please give your opinion based on information provided.
Thank you!!!
Pics below:
<Bob Fenner>

Re: Chipped Corner       1/30/15
Thank you for your super quick assessment Bob!
<Welcome Phil>
I understand this as using two 29” tall x 4” wide x 3/8” thick glass strips siliconed vertical to the back and side, correct?
I’m assuming this relieves the outward pressure away from the chip?
<Yes and yes>
Thanks for your help!!!
<Welcome again; BobF>
Re: Chipped Corner
       1/30/15
Thank you, I’ll try this and keep my fingers crossed, the chip honestly doesn’t look that bad/deep, but its large surface area is the issue I guess.
<Yes>
Does it matter which corner overlaps the other as far as strength goes, or should I just match the corners of the aquarium?
<I'd cover over the chipped edge, meeting up level w/ the piece on the other side. B>

Re: Chipped Corner        2/19/15
Will do, thank you Bob for all the help!
-----
Phil
<Welcome! BobF>

Cracked aquarium corner        1/21/15
Good afternoon. I came across WWM as I was researching how to address a crack on the corner of my 90 gallon. I read through your other posts and it appears that no one has inquired about my particular situation yet. I have had the tank for 14 months and noticed the crack about 6 months ago. As I have a reef tank, I really don't want to tear it down so I thought that
I'd observe first. The crack runs only through the front plate. When viewed from the front, it is 1/8" wide and when viewed from the side, it is 1/16" wide. If you viewed top down, it would be triangular. If I measure the height, it is 1.5 inches long assuming that it starts from the base hidden by the trim. It appears to be very slowing moving upwards. So, as the crack
is not moving in towards the tank, I was thinking about removing that piece (maybe with a Dremel saw?)
<NO! Don't do this... glass... being a super-cooled liquid... can be ground down, but this will NOT improve the structural strength; and very likely dis-improve it>
so that it doesn't keep moving up. What are your thoughts? I have attached a few pics. Thank you
Mat
<Well; as the break/crack is moving; I would decommission this tank; sell it to someone for partial-fill use... for aquatic turtles, a paludarium perhaps... or dry use. Otherwise, you could Silicone on supportive strips as gone over on WWM along the corners/edges of the broken pane. I would NOT leave this tank up and running as it is... there IS a very real chance of sudden failure here... disastrous for your livestock, floor and should anyone be near when it catastrophically fails. Bob Fenner>

 

Re: Cracked aquarium corner        1/21/15
Thank you for your advice! I had hoped it was as simple as removing the piece.
<Removing the one panel.... really more work than it's worth. What is your time worth?>

I have contacted the vendor for a replacement. Not looking moving the fish and coral! Thanks again.
<Simple to do... See the "moving plans" on WWM... get the tools, mat.s together... a friend or two; do it systematically and it's no big deal. The peace of mind.... well worth it. BobF>

Repair inquiry    12/24/14
Good Evening
<Steph>
I purchased a 42 gallon bow front tank from Craig's list. I discovered when I got it home that there is a chip inside the seams as if it was bumped. It's smooth on the outside and inside and it does not leak. I'm worried about making this into my larger salt water aquarium. Do you think I need to make repairs such as this. Or am I being paranoid? I've attached
some photos. Thanks for your help on repairing or leaving this alone :)
<Only one pic came through, twice... where is this chip at on the side... IF near the top few inches likely it will be fine... if lower down on the side, I would at least effect a two inch strip of glass down both sides... Siliconing the strips in.
Bob Fenner>
Thanks for your help.

Yet another chip question      12/10/14
I'm sorry to bother you with another question about chips, but it seems every inquiry is slightly different from mine. We bought a used 40 gallon breeder, and neglected to set it up for a few weeks. When I finally cleaned it, I noticed a shell- shaped chip on one corner, about 2.5" down from the top. A pair of freshwater angels is going into it, so I need to be able to fill it completely. Some silicone was also flaking off as I cleaned. Is this tank okay or should I get rid of it?
Many thanks.
<Well, the chipping looks okay (near the top and not too likely to spread)... do fill the area in w/ Silicone to prevent cutting your hands and fingers. The Silicone flaking off? I see that the bonds look okay on the glass itself... IF this is the case I think you're fine here as well. I would try this tank out as is at this point, rather than cutting out and replacing the internal/corner seals. Bob Fenner>

Chipped edge      10/31/14
Hi guys I found your post and hope you can help me! I bought a used 110 xh reef tank and have it in my office. It looks like someone bumped it and chipped a piece off of the corner about the length of a nickel and as thick as a dime. Do you think this is still a usable tank? Thanks!!
<From the size, shape and position (nearer the top), I think you'll be okay with this chip. I would fill the gap in with Silastic/Silicone Rubber, to save yourself from easily cutting your hands, arms on the sharp edges.
Bob Fenner>

Chip in tank    10/8/14
Hello, kind sirs. I've got a standard 55. Upon inspection I noticed a small chip roughly 1/16", maybe 3/32" long and wide (circular-esque) and MAYBE 1/16" deep at the most. Its roughly 3" off center and almost exactly halfway between top and bottom. The glass itself is 1/4" thick.
Safe to use in your opinion? Any answers would be greatly appreciated.
<This small chip should not be a problem>
Thanking you in advance...
A concerned father of 2.
<Cheers, Bob Fenner>

Re: Chip in tank    10/8/14
Thank you for your timely response, sir. My daughters, 5 and 4, tell me to tell you "Thanks you for fixing our fish house."
Thanks again.
<Welcome. Bob Fenner>

Movers crunched the end of my 90 gal tank about half way down      10/6/14
Hi!! Movers crunched the end of my 90 gal tank about half way down. Holds water, no leaks. Think its ok, or should I try to reinforce?
Thank you in advance
<I would Silicone on a glass strip about four inches wide on the chipped face, matching the corner. See WWM re.
Bob Fenner>

Re: Movers crunched the end of my 90 gal tank about half way down      10/6/14
On the inside or outside? Thank you for the quick response
<Out. Read where you've been referred. B>

Chipped rimless new tank 100g cube     9/15/14
Hi I'm concerned about a chip in my new tank I've attached pics the chip is not on the outside... chip is on the side glass at the bottom of the tank in the seam between the side and the bottoms glass only goes threw half the thickness of the glass on the seam... what should I do if anything? Thank u guys...
<Mmm; I think you might be lucky here... the scallop type breaks can be forgiving. IF the tank is empty and dry currently I would fill in the
chipped area with Aquarium Silastic/Silicone (more for preventing cuts to human hands than structural repair)>
Also what do I put under the tank between the glass and wood before filling the tank I heard foam... If so how thick? Can I use a rubber pad?
<A half inch cut piece of either is what I'd use; assuring the stand surface is strong, linear and planar as well of course.
Bob Fenner>


Re: Chipped rimless new tank 100g cube   9/16/14
The crack is in between the glass on the bottom it is not in a place where
it could be touched...
<Ah, good>
I was just worried about the silicone seam.. that is
where the crack is and it has broken the seam half way threw... should I attempt to get broken glass out before recaulking?
<No; I would not>
Or should I just put a
thin layer over the bottom to fill it in.... ty for your response and how
quick u were
<Welcome... and surprisingly, am out dive/visiting in Bali currently.
BobF>
re: Chipped rimless new tank 100g cube
   9/16/14
Wow that's great to hear takes a lot of weight off my shoulders knowing it
should be ok... wow I wish I was diving in Bali that sounds awesome. ..
Enjoy your time there thanks again for your quick response
<Certainly welcome. Bob Fenner>

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