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FAQs about Gracilaria, aka Ogo

Related Articles: Red Algae in General, Coralline Marine AlgaeAvoiding Algae Problems in Marine System, Algae Control, Marine Maintenance, Marine Scavengers, Snails, Hermit Crabs, Mithrax/Emerald Green Crabs, Sea Urchins, Blennies, Algae Filters, Ctenochaetus/Bristle Mouth Tangs, Zebrasoma/Sailfin Tangs, Skimmers, Skimmer Selection, Marine Algae, Coralline Algae, Green Algae, Brown Algae, Blue-Green "Algae"/(Cyanobacteria)Diatoms, Brown AlgaeAlgae as Food

Related FAQs: Red Algae ID 1, Red Algae ID 3, Red Algae ID 4, Red Algae ID5, & Red Algae 1, Red Algae 2, Red Algae 3, Red Algae in General, Red Algae 2, Red Algae 3, Red Algae Behavior, Red Algae Compatibility, Red Algae Selection, Red Algae Systems, Red Algae Nutrition, Red Algae Disease, Red Algae Reproduction/Propagation, Coralline Algae, Marine Macro-Algae, Use in AquariumsAlgae as FoodMarine Algae ID 1, Marine Algae ID 2, Marine Algae Control FAQs II, Marine Algaecide Use, Nutrient Limitation, Marine Algae Eaters, Culturing Macro-Algae; Controlling: BGA/Cyano, Red/Encrusting Algae, Green Algae, Brown/Diatom Algae


Hundreds of species in this genus

New Print and eBook on Amazon

Marine Aquarium Algae Control

by Robert (Bob) Fenner

cyanobacteria vs. macroalgae lighting      2/27/14
Hi Crew,
Under typical aquarium conditions does cyanobacteria have a competitive advantage over red Gracilaria algae/macro algae in areas of low intensity lighting?
<Define "typical"... under more/less ideal/ized conditions; no>
 I have read on your site that cyanobacteria would have an advantage in low flow areas (I plan on increasing water flow) but I want to know if I should plan on adding more light.  Tank parameters:  temp=78degF; salinity=1.025; carbonate hardness=10dKH; pH=8.15; ammonia= 0.0; NO3=5ppm; PO4= 0.03ppm.
<More involved of course... >
Thanks,
Mark
P.S.  Wet Web Media is an extremely valuable site for the home aquarist. 
Anytime someone asks me about starting an aquarium I point them in your direction first.
<Ah yes... twenty years on; the site provides all I had hoped for.
Inspiration, information and outlet for my and others efforts. Bob Fenner>
Re: cyanobacteria vs. macroalgae lighting      2/27/14

Wow!  Fast response.  The ink on my computer screen wasn't even dry before I received your reply.  I will keep perusing Wet Web
<Here: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/bluegralgae.htm
and the linked files above>
 and try to find out what the Gracilaria needs that may be lacking.  My guess is water flow since the shift from macroalgae to cyanobacteria seems to correlate to removing air stones from the system.  I just wanted to know if lighting could be a contributing factor.
Thanks again, Mark  

Red Gracilaria Turning Green      11/25/13
Greetings Dearest Crew!
 <Howsit Joe?>
Hope that this message finds you in good spirits!
 <Ah yes; thank you>
Just a quick question today. I have a 155 gallon in-wall reef that is 3 months old and doing quite well so far. I've slowly been stocking with corals from my pre-existing tank but no fish yet.
 I have 2 fuges connected, 1 with 5" oolitic sand, the other, 3" of mud/sand mix. In both, I have Gracilaria algae. I added a small ball of it when the tank was first filled with water and it has grown dramatically, filling a large portion of both fuges. As of last week however, it has turned green, quite quickly too I might add. From a distance, one could easily mistake it for Chaetomorpha. Both fuges are roughly 10 gallons each and are each lit with their own 6500K, 14watt CFL.
 I believe that the simplest explanation is that the algae is dying. What confuses is why it would go downhill so fast after such dramatic growth.
<Mmm, "happens" at times>
Lighting has seemed to be fine despite it not "tumbling" and I don't think that this is the issue. The only other issue that I can think of would be the lack of nutrients from running the system fishless, although I have shrimp and crabs that I feed regularly. In addition, I "feed" the refugiums every other day or so by throwing some NLS pellets in.
<Do you measure any actual NO3, HPO4?>
If there was a lack of nutrients, wouldn't the Gracilaria simply stop growing? Why such a dramatic change?
 <Something else might be at play; but can't tell. I would state that all such algae (and real plants) are actually green (always); that other pigments just mask the green... I would not give up on the Gracilaria... but do check the nitrate, phosphate levels... and go a bit heavier on foods if zip>
Thanks so much!
Joe W.
<Welcome. BobF>

Gracilaria for feeding Tangs  10/15/13
Greetings Bob & Crew!
 <Hey Joe, where you goin' with that fish net in your hand, dun dah dah dah dah>
Hope that this email finds you in good spirits and health!
 <Ah yes; thank you>
Just a quick question today. I've had great success with growing red Gracilaria sp. algae in my 2 refugiums connected to the 155 gallon display.
The tank is only 2 months old and has no corals or fish yet, only snails to battle the diatoms. In the future I will be adding at least 2 tangs to the display and just wanted to pick your brain as to which would be the most suitable to dine on Gracilaria. From reading my beloved copy of "Reef Invertebrates",
<Oh! Recently found a case in the garage... New copies are being offered on Amazon.com for a low starting price of 84 US!>
I've learned that Tangs are often specific with the type of algae they consume.
<Ah yes>
Bob did an awesome job specifying which Tang eats turf, bubble, hair, and other algaes. However, I didn't find information in regards to which species often consumes Gracilaria. From my reading, most Tangs are likely to accept it, especially live, but I would like to go beyond this and purchase one that likely specifically eats this algae in nature.
 <Yes to this as well. The genus is quite large (a few hundred described species) w/ some being more palatable than others... "the" Ogo is often taken readily by most all...>
Taking advantage of nutrient recycling is a great concept and I'm hoping to indefinitely continue the cycle with this system.
Thanks so much for everything you've done for the hobby!
Joe Westwood
<Ah, welcome. My first choices in tangs in general are members of the genera Ctenochaetus and smaller sized Zebrasomas... there are others; gone over in articles, FAQs files archived on/as WWM. Cheers, Bob Fenner>
Re: Gracilaria for feeding Tangs  10/15/13

Thank you Bob!
 <Welcome Joe>
I will check out the WWM articles more carefully. Definitely adding a Ctenochaetus sp. to the tank for diatom control. I'm hoping for a Chevron but the pocketbook is leaning towards a Kole!
 <Both fine choices>
Any idea on how the Paracanthurus sp. would take to Gracilaria?
<Yes; eat with gusto>
 I was hoping to add one of these guys despite their reputation for getting sick more often.
<Better than a few others...>
However, I have read that they feed more on Zoo-plankton as compared to other Tang species.
 <Mmm, not really... only one species of Surgeon is mostly carnivorous, and that species of Acanthurus doesn't make it into the trade>
Thank you!!
Joe
<Cheers, BobF>

New Print and eBook on Amazon

Marine Aquarium Algae Control

by Robert (Bob) Fenner

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